5K Race Question & General Comment

So, after reading Jon’s race report, I started wondering how seasoned racers approach a 5K. Do you run balls out (as they say), and just let your body pick up the pieces later? Is the plan to have some sense of pace just like you would for a marathon, only faster? How do YOU approach it?

General comment: After running my first race one town over and then getting a ride to my second race, I’m feeling somewhat lazy about choosing the next race that’ll come before the one I told everyone would be my first race. Funny, isn’t it?

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  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2932366 The Running Blogfather

    I don’t think i qualify as an experienced SHORT distance runner (e.g. 5k) but I guess I would be considered experienced running the longer distances with 5 marathons and probably a similar number of halfs in the mix…

    So, if I fit the bill of experienced runner, my answer for a 5k would be full out running till I’m almost puking and it might be strange for you to know that I know EXACTLY how hard to push and for how long before I start the gag-reflex (it’s 95% max heart rate for over 2 minutes!). The reason I say to go all out for 5k, is that once you’ve “left it all out on the course” for 26.2 miles, 5k is a very short period of time to put yourself through in pain.

    As I’ve mentioned in some other posts, the hard part of racing to me is creating the toughness in your MIND to overcome physical pain.

    You simply don’t need to be mentally tough for as long in a short race.

    I hope this has not sounded big-headed. We all start at the beginning – I just happen to be ahead of some people. Incidentally I am well behind many many others!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2932366 The Running Blogfather

    I don’t think i qualify as an experienced SHORT distance runner (e.g. 5k) but I guess I would be considered experienced running the longer distances with 5 marathons and probably a similar number of halfs in the mix…

    So, if I fit the bill of experienced runner, my answer for a 5k would be full out running till I’m almost puking and it might be strange for you to know that I know EXACTLY how hard to push and for how long before I start the gag-reflex (it’s 95% max heart rate for over 2 minutes!). The reason I say to go all out for 5k, is that once you’ve “left it all out on the course” for 26.2 miles, 5k is a very short period of time to put yourself through in pain.

    As I’ve mentioned in some other posts, the hard part of racing to me is creating the toughness in your MIND to overcome physical pain.

    You simply don’t need to be mentally tough for as long in a short race.

    I hope this has not sounded big-headed. We all start at the beginning – I just happen to be ahead of some people. Incidentally I am well behind many many others!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Not sounding big-headed at all. That’s exactly what I wanted to hear. I hope to hear from others, but yours was a great answer, too.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Not sounding big-headed at all. That’s exactly what I wanted to hear. I hope to hear from others, but yours was a great answer, too.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2544387 Jon in Michigan

    That’s what people on the V-board said, “Go all out and just try to hang on!”. I think some people diagreed somewhat but that seemed to be the big consensus. I think the idea is that you don’t want to finish and feel like you could have run more. Its kinda scary getting to that point though.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2544387 Jon in Michigan

    That’s what people on the V-board said, “Go all out and just try to hang on!”. I think some people diagreed somewhat but that seemed to be the big consensus. I think the idea is that you don’t want to finish and feel like you could have run more. Its kinda scary getting to that point though.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2544387 Jon in Michigan

    That’s what people on the V-board said, “Go all out and just try to hang on!”. I think some people diagreed somewhat but that seemed to be the big consensus. I think the idea is that you don’t want to finish and feel like you could have run more. Its kinda scary getting to that point though.

  • Anonymous

    what is your goal of running at your own pace?
    and
    what is your goal of running full out?

    maybe that would help decide?

    -kat

  • Anonymous

    what is your goal of running at your own pace?
    and
    what is your goal of running full out?

    maybe that would help decide?

    -kat

  • Anonymous

    what is your goal of running at your own pace?
    and
    what is your goal of running full out?

    maybe that would help decide?

    -kat

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Like always, kat, you have the right question. And you’re right: I guess I’d have two reasons for doing either of those things. I’d run to finish just to stay in the races, to stay fit, to maybe be a little social. I’d run all out to see what my body was capable of doing. Not against other people, but against my views of what I am becoming. There’s a great reason why I’m married to you.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Like always, kat, you have the right question. And you’re right: I guess I’d have two reasons for doing either of those things. I’d run to finish just to stay in the races, to stay fit, to maybe be a little social. I’d run all out to see what my body was capable of doing. Not against other people, but against my views of what I am becoming. There’s a great reason why I’m married to you.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Like always, kat, you have the right question. And you’re right: I guess I’d have two reasons for doing either of those things. I’d run to finish just to stay in the races, to stay fit, to maybe be a little social. I’d run all out to see what my body was capable of doing. Not against other people, but against my views of what I am becoming. There’s a great reason why I’m married to you.

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2932366 The Running Blogfather

    okay, somebody has to say it…

    …awwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.

    ;)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2932366 The Running Blogfather

    okay, somebody has to say it…

    …awwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.

    ;)

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/2932366 The Running Blogfather

    okay, somebody has to say it…

    …awwwwwwwwwwwwwwww.

    ;)

  • http://www.zoombits.co.uk/search/sumvision-cyclone-micro-hd-movie-player/19245 sumvision cyclone micro

    I think I have two reasons to do any of these things. I will run to the end just to stay in the race to stay in shape, maybe a little social. I ran every effort to see what my body was capable of doing.