Social Media Workflows Part 1: Awareness and Capture

Joseph Funston office

We use social media tools for different purposes. We might use it for distribution of media, for marketing, for customer service, for promotion, for communication, and most likely, for all of the above. How you use it depends on your end goals, obviously. But most times, people are being thrust into using social media without really knowing what the goals are, and without knowing what kind of workflow should accompany the use of the tool. Instead, they swing by Facebook to see if anyone commented on the wall update, and they visit Twitter to reply to a few things, retweet a few other things, and they end up feeling like they’re not sure why they’re doing this, let alone how it’s going to serve the cause.

For the sake of this post, we’ll talk about the marketing aspects mostly. Oh, and this is just PART 1: AWARENESS AND CAPTURE. Depending on how it’s received, I’ll add more.

Here are some thoughts on developing social media workflows (including the first building blocks).

Goals First

Where most people get tripped up with social media is that they don’t have solid and clear goals in mind. Goals for using social media for your business can be varied. A few sample goals:

  • Increase subscribers to our newsletter by __%.
  • Increase sales.
  • Promote community engagement (measured by comments and other touches).
  • Improve awareness (measured by site visits or video views or similar, and better still, next actions taken).
  • Gather customer feedback for product and service enhancement/improvement.

You’ll note that the goals listed above also have tangible measurements attached to them. Showing up in social media to dip your toes in the pool isn’t all that useful. It’s fun and it might prove that you’re using all the cool kid toys, but if you’re not building on something tangible, then there’s nothing worth doing. Caveat to that: it’s okay to not understand how you’re going to achieve these goals right out of the gate. Part of the process is to actually understand the medium and figure out how to best use it.

Thinking in Blocks

If you and I were drawing this together on a white board, or using post-its and an easel, we’d be drawing blocks. The blocks would be like recipe elements, or like bits of code, or like building blocks for kids. I’m a visual thinker, and I think it helps the process. Because I’m too lazy, it’s up to you to get out some sticky notes and make some blocks. Everything below this should be a block to consider.

Awareness

Unless your goal is to support and satisfy an existing organization (for instance, if you’re an association or if this is an internal project), the next thing you’ll want to work on is understanding how to raise awareness of your project. Creating amazing and compelling content is excellent, unless no one sees it. Awareness is tricky these days. YouTube is the #2 search engine in the world, and it serves billions of video views every year. That sounds promising until you realize that means you’re competing with billions of other videos, so just putting up a video there won’t help. This will be the problem with most every project you work on.

To gain awareness, you’ll have to find the people you need to target. To do that, you’ll need to understand the landscape.

Landscape

If I were building something to accomplish these goals, I’d first need to understand the landscape and which tools I’d want to use. For instance, if you’re doing something heavily B2B, there might not be a lot of value in hanging out on Facebook and Twitter, and maybe not even LinkedIn. Acquisition of new people would be the first and foremost thing to consider in that case, actually. If your product faces consumers, then you know that you might want to approach them on a series of mediums. Finding people could be as using a service like Rapleaf or Flowtown. You’ll note something (and we’ll talk about this more): these services all run on email as the hinge. You’ll note that email addresses are the true coin of the realm of understanding and using social media, at least from a marketing perspective.

Figuring out the landscape and the awareness are probably the first two blocks in any workflow, in my mind, or else you’re kind of wasting your effort.

Database

Once you know how you’re going to tackle awareness, and once you have a sense of the landscape where you intend to find people to appreciate and admire your projects, you’ll want a way to capture information about them and do something of value with it. You need some kind of database. If you’re a larger company, then you’re going to want to integrate these people into your existing CRM. Products like Salesforce already have spots to put people’s social media identities. ACT might, as well. I know that Batchbook has that built right in. What you’re looking to create in your database is a kind of Rosetta Stone of people’s social map. So, once you’ve done your work, you might have my Twitter account, my Facebook account, my LinkedIn account, my YouTube account and whatever matters to you.

You’ll obviously also want to store some information that you glean from those channels. Perhaps on YouTube, you’ll note that my daughter does product reviews with me, and maybe you sell a kid’s product. You’ll note that on Twitter, I talk about hip hop, and maybe that will be of value to you. Who knows? But salespeople understand the value of such information. The point is, that without a database, you’re just making stuff and setting it free on the world.

Capture

If you’re looking to build awareness and you’re looking to do something with it, you’ll need to think in terms of capturing these new potential leads so that you can understand which of them can be turned into prospects. Remember that not everyone who interacts with you is a lead. Not everyone who watches your video is a lead. Remember that you have to do some good community work to convert any of these people into buyers and that their response to your efforts to engage doesn’t mean that they want to buy. (Please repeat this over and over to eager salespeople and hungry marketers.)

Just the same, we have to do some things to seek out and find people to add to our database.

Listening is a great capture. If you learn how to grow bigger ears, the results of such efforts will help you find people via the listening channel. As people start voicing their needs, they aren’t exactly saying your name every time, so you might have to work on finding what phrases and words people will use that identify what you sell. Note: it’s rarely what you put on your marketing materials (though maybe it should be?).

Creating good media is a great way to seek capture. For instance, if you write a really useful newsletter, people will sign up. If you create free webinars, people will sign up. These aren’t immediately prospects, but they are at least leads that you can run down. With a social media perspective to capture, perhaps what you do after gathering up these new email addresses is you run them through RapLeaf of Flowtown and find out where these people spend time online. From that, you might learn a bit more about what these people are into and how that might apply to determining if they’re a useful prospect, and also possibly helping you better understand how to market to them and eventually sell them your product or service.

Capture is one of the steps that I feel most people miss with social media workflows. They create interesting stuff and then don’t do much to try and build a follow-on step, OR they go for “sale” as the next step. In most workflows offline, sale is the fourth or fifth action. I never understood why people thought it would be truncated online.

Here Endeth Part One

The awareness and capture elements of a social media workflow are something that will take some time to ingest and work through. I think we’ll stop here and see what comes of this. If you find it interesting, please comment. If you disagree or want to rebut, by all means, please do. These are just some serving suggestions. If you want to write your own version of the article with some more steps, by all means, please do, and consider linking back to this post.

That’s the beauty of this stuff. We can all collaborate and contribute. What say you?

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  • http://www.experiate.net Paul Flanigan

    Okay, here’s the 800 pound gorilla: Time. When building your goals, what is your time frame? Too often we see time as a non-negotiable factor, which hurries the process thus yielding little results.

    Reading through the post, think about Landscape as the first step. Part of that process is reading other tweets/blogs. One huge topic is time related to success. Most good bloggers and Tweeters will tell you that this takes months, maybe at least a year, to really find success with connections.

    I believe that too often time (or a timeline, or a date) is the first decision to make when, in reality, it should be an outcome created by the strategy.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Great point to consider, Paul. Time matters a great deal. I usually tell companies to give this kind of work 3 months to see results. Month 1 for trial. Month 2 for error. Month 3 for correction and likely forward flow.

      • http://www.experiate.net Paul Flanigan

        That’s a solid foundation, but I would add that the number of resources you can pour into understanding, the more flexible that timeline can be. Small mom-and-pop shops might need more time with one person running the research. Bigger companies with a team can work that 3 mo frame. All relative.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Great point to consider, Paul. Time matters a great deal. I usually tell companies to give this kind of work 3 months to see results. Month 1 for trial. Month 2 for error. Month 3 for correction and likely forward flow.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Great point to consider, Paul. Time matters a great deal. I usually tell companies to give this kind of work 3 months to see results. Month 1 for trial. Month 2 for error. Month 3 for correction and likely forward flow.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KLPL42KES5BPIFYDPTY5FQB6ZE BW

      Good question. I don’t normally think in terms of “time” when it comes to social media and marketing (maybe I should!) because I think that time is relative. What I mean is, you can give three people the same amount of time and at the end of that period they will be in drastically different places. Specifically, with social media, I think time can be crunched by 1) increasing the relevancy of your content and 2) stepping up your off-line efforts to drive people to your online presence.

      As an example, my first blog post for a brand-new photo business I set up in an area I just moved to generated over 100 views and over 20 comments within the first week because I had highly-relevant content and worked hard offline to generate the traffic.

      Great thoughts on the time aspect! Thanks!

  • http://www.experiate.net Paul Flanigan

    Okay, here’s the 800 pound gorilla: Time. When building your goals, what is your time frame? Too often we see time as a non-negotiable factor, which hurries the process thus yielding little results.

    Reading through the post, think about Landscape as the first step. Part of that process is reading other tweets/blogs. One huge topic is time related to success. Most good bloggers and Tweeters will tell you that this takes months, maybe at least a year, to really find success with connections.

    I believe that too often time (or a timeline, or a date) is the first decision to make when, in reality, it should be an outcome created by the strategy.

  • http://twitter.com/NancyD68 Nancy Davis

    This is exactly what I needed to read this morning. We are getting ready to launch our website in the next week or so, and my personal blog as well. I have been “hanging out” on Facebook and Twitter, and I feel like only now am I starting to feel more comfortable.

    I sign up for many newsletters (yours included) and webinars. I am not in able right now to buy other services, but that is very likely to change in a few more months as I gain some revenue.

    I have plenty of sticky notes by the way…

  • http://twitter.com/NancyD68 Nancy Davis

    This is exactly what I needed to read this morning. We are getting ready to launch our website in the next week or so, and my personal blog as well. I have been “hanging out” on Facebook and Twitter, and I feel like only now am I starting to feel more comfortable.

    I sign up for many newsletters (yours included) and webinars. I am not in able right now to buy other services, but that is very likely to change in a few more months as I gain some revenue.

    I have plenty of sticky notes by the way…

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Seems to be the way to do it, Nancy. That way, if you’re interested and then a future buyer, I’ve had a relationship with you for a while. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Seems to be the way to do it, Nancy. That way, if you’re interested and then a future buyer, I’ve had a relationship with you for a while. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Seems to be the way to do it, Nancy. That way, if you’re interested and then a future buyer, I’ve had a relationship with you for a while. : )

  • http://twitter.com/NancyD68 Nancy Davis

    This is exactly what I needed to read this morning. We are getting ready to launch our website in the next week or so, and my personal blog as well. I have been “hanging out” on Facebook and Twitter, and I feel like only now am I starting to feel more comfortable.

    I sign up for many newsletters (yours included) and webinars. I am not in able right now to buy other services, but that is very likely to change in a few more months as I gain some revenue.

    I have plenty of sticky notes by the way…

  • http://www.rethinkacademy.com Patrick McCrann

    Chris, as always great stuff here. I like where you are starting (awareness) and think the detail which you provide is really useful. How far folks want to dig in, thinking of @Paul’s comment, is a function of what their goals are. For some businesses, SM is only a sliver of what they do…whereas for others it’s the backbone. Before you head to part two, a mindmap or visualization of what you describe would really complement this well. Thanks again.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Quite so, Patrick. It sure isn’t *easy*>

  • http://www.rethinkacademy.com Patrick McCrann

    Chris, as always great stuff here. I like where you are starting (awareness) and think the detail which you provide is really useful. How far folks want to dig in, thinking of @Paul’s comment, is a function of what their goals are. For some businesses, SM is only a sliver of what they do…whereas for others it’s the backbone. Before you head to part two, a mindmap or visualization of what you describe would really complement this well. Thanks again.

  • http://matthewm.org Matt Medeiros

    Landscape is probably the most important for small (micro) business. I have some clients rushing to get onto Facebook/Twitter and don’t have anything engaging to share. Maybe some random “fun” facts or a personal look into their business – but nothing that will build a relationship.

    Sometimes I hope this all isn’t a bubble ;)

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Great points, Matt. I think it’s where we have the most opportunity to learn.

  • http://matthewm.org Matt Medeiros

    Landscape is probably the most important for small (micro) business. I have some clients rushing to get onto Facebook/Twitter and don’t have anything engaging to share. Maybe some random “fun” facts or a personal look into their business – but nothing that will build a relationship.

    Sometimes I hope this all isn’t a bubble ;)

  • Maria Fussilli

    Thank you for this. I definitely find it interesting and valuable, and need as many Parts beyond Part 1 as you’re willing to share. Your Related Posts links are always very helpful, too.

    Re: truncation, it may have evolved from online’s cut-to-the-chase nature where the user’s ability to by-pass is unparalleled in other sales channels. Or, perhaps it’s truncated by the lack of social steps and tangents that naturally occur in face-to-face sales. Whatever the reason(s), I think you’re correct in saying truncation of the sales process online is a mistake.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Great points of view, Maria. Thanks for sharing those. : )

  • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

    Set long term and short term goals..this is what will separate you from the rest..

    “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      What are yours?

      • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

        My long term goals are to become well know in this marketing world as a helpful guy..

        “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

      • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

        My long term goals are to become well know in this marketing world as a helpful guy..

        “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

  • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

    Set long term and short term goals..this is what will separate you from the rest..

    “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

  • http://twitter.com/tomcatalini Tom Catalini

    From Flowdown:

    “Why is registration closed?

    We’re in the processing of retooling Flowtown and will start inviting new users over the next few weeks.”

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Well crap. I heard they were off the game, but I thought the site looked so alive. Crap. Someone make a new flowtown.

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    First, I freaked out because for a moment I thought my grandma was in the picture you have for this post. That would have been toooooo weird.

    Second, I need to print out this post and paste it to my wall.

    Thank you for writing it!

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    First, I freaked out because for a moment I thought my grandma was in the picture you have for this post. That would have been toooooo weird.

    Second, I need to print out this post and paste it to my wall.

    Thank you for writing it!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That might be her. : )

      • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

        Nope, definitely tisn’t. But thanks for making me look again :)

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    First, I freaked out because for a moment I thought my grandma was in the picture you have for this post. That would have been toooooo weird.

    Second, I need to print out this post and paste it to my wall.

    Thank you for writing it!

  • http://TannerChristensen.com tannerc

    Seems to me like this is a great starter and refresher course for social outreach Chris.

    Undoubtedly the most important point I feel you make here is this: if you don’t have a goal, you’re better off doing something else. It’s too easy to get stuck in the mindframe of “everyone else is using this, so I should too!” and then being disappointed when nothing happens as a result.

    Set goals, listen to the crowd, and most importantly – as stated in Trust Agents – become one of the crowd, not just someone who sells, sells, sells.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that. The goals thing is something I push at EVERY event. It’s probably the most important message I have, if I have one. Well, that and be human. : )

  • http://twitter.com/SCBusiness Spacecoast Business

    Great insights – Chris. We use a method whereby we use our goals to determine behavioral steps and message – what does our audience need to DO and what do we need to SAY to encourage them to do it.
    The Landscape concept only makes this perspective more effective.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Happy that it helped. : )

  • http://twitter.com/SCBusiness Spacecoast Business

    Great insights – Chris. We use a method whereby we use our goals to determine behavioral steps and message – what does our audience need to DO and what do we need to SAY to encourage them to do it.
    The Landscape concept only makes this perspective more effective.

  • http://thisoldbrain.net Mike Kirkeberg

    I hadn’t thought about social media this way. I’ve always used it with the hope to get people to the blog, and to some degree to become more social on the web, but I haven’t (or haven’t until recently) thought about the “why” I’m doing that.
    Mike

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Can’t wait to see how that changes the plans, Mike. : )

  • http://thisoldbrain.net Mike Kirkeberg

    I hadn’t thought about social media this way. I’ve always used it with the hope to get people to the blog, and to some degree to become more social on the web, but I haven’t (or haven’t until recently) thought about the “why” I’m doing that.
    Mike

  • http://thisoldbrain.net Mike Kirkeberg

    I hadn’t thought about social media this way. I’ve always used it with the hope to get people to the blog, and to some degree to become more social on the web, but I haven’t (or haven’t until recently) thought about the “why” I’m doing that.
    Mike

  • http://www.writeoncontent.com Julie

    You explain concepts in such an elegant way. I have just “dipped” my toes in the social media landscape. I’ve gotten some clients from facebook, and I’m at the point of “how do I expand on this,” when your post shows up.

    I can’t wait for part 2 and beyond.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Happy to help, Julie. Thanks and I’ll get that figured out shortly.

  • Anonymous

    Way too complicated, dude. Streamline.

    • http://pulse.yahoo.com/_KLPL42KES5BPIFYDPTY5FQB6ZE BW

      If you sketch this out it’s actually very streamlined and structured. I tried posting a link earlier to a graphic of this article but that spam catcher ate the comment. =(

  • http://marianlibrarian.com Marian Schembari

    My favorite bit is definitely “goals first.” I can’t tell you how many times I’ve asked for a client’s goals and all I get is a blank stale. This is such a valuable part of constructing a social media plan, I don’t care if you’re an author looking to sell tons of books or a freelance photographer looking to land her first client. As long as you WRITE DOWN “I want to sell 10,000 paperbacks by next December” or “I want to book one extra family portrait session per month using Twitter” you’ll be waaaaay ahead of the game.

    Good stuff Chris, as always :)

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that, Marian. My favorite.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that, Marian. My favorite.

  • http://www.clarabelamedia.com Clara Mathews

    Setting goals is the most important thing to me, but often clients want to tie social media to dollars or new business and it doesn’t usually work that way. Also, it takes time to achieve your goals.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I tie mine to dollars. It’s my favorite. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I tie mine to dollars. It’s my favorite. : )

  • http://www.clarabelamedia.com Clara Mathews

    Setting goals is the most important thing to me, but often clients want to tie social media to dollars or new business and it doesn’t usually work that way. Also, it takes time to achieve your goals.

  • Jjwalburn

    I will digest these valuable tidbits but will be ready for more content for phase 2. I am creating a social media strategy for a golf association and these articles you post are very helpful.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Glad to help. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Glad to help. : )

  • Jjwalburn

    I will digest these valuable tidbits but will be ready for more content for phase 2. I am creating a social media strategy for a golf association and these articles you post are very helpful.

  • littlelu0

    I was interested by what you said about using rapleaf to find customers. I hadn’t heard of it before, but it sounds pretty useful if you want to see where you customers are most likely to be surfing in order to see if they would be a good lead.

    On the other hand, after reading some articles on rapleaf, I realized how it’s getting a lot of slack for its questionable data mining. In your opinion, how much is this method encroaching on privacy rights? And could you explain how exactly it works?

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      People’s privacy isn’t being violated. They offer their information via the various forms and it’s all public data. The problem is that people rarely know what they’ve signed up for when they sign on. Have you *read* Facebook’s privacy rules? Yikes.

  • http://twitter.com/DunnRealty Dunn Realty

    Great stuff! Things most of us know, but need to be reminded of from time to time. Otherwise we end up spending hours on Facebook and Twitter only to realize that we’ve actually accomplished nothing except finding out what your Facebook ‘neighbor’ needs a new fence post on Farmville or that #JerseyShore is trending on Twitter.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I couldn’t have said it better.

  • Mark Modesti

    Chris, I think his is excellent stuff. Hope parts 2 and beyond are yet to come!

  • http://www.advancedwebads.com/sc/164 Randy Addison

    This is definitely an excellent write up. I think the best and the most important thing here is to CAPTURE. You need to capture people’s attention. capture the best way to capture.

  • http://twitter.com/nuttynupur nuttynupur

    Thanks for showing me how I can bring some order in my current social media chaos! Right brain must meet left brain:)

  • http://www.BuyWholesaleDealsJax.com Jonson Yousefzadeh

    Great content, I appreciate the way you take a complex and ever-changing field and break it down to simple and actionable steps and align that with what your overall goals are. Too often I think a lot of us entreprenurial types find ourselves getting very busy with these tools and don’t realize that with a little structure and a gameplan we can accomplish a lot more in less time. Please continue this post series.

  • http://vitiligocover.com Nathalie

    This series is exactly what i’ve been needing. At time I feel overwhelmed by the many social media tools I am using, and your ideas will hopefully help me focus and get more control over using them properly to meet my business needs. Thanks, Chris :)

  • http://www.ventureneer.com Geri Stengel

    Online or traditional, marketing is basically the same: Establish measurable goals, know your market, make a plan to hit the target and measure success, then go for it. I agree with you. Too many people think that social media don’t need the pre-planning and monitoring that traditional media do. Wrong.

  • http://www.ventureneer.com Geri Stengel

    Online or traditional, marketing is basically the same: Establish measurable goals, know your market, make a plan to hit the target and measure success, then go for it. I agree with you. Too many people think that social media don’t need the pre-planning and monitoring that traditional media do. Wrong.

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  • Jim Drake

    This is very helpful to a 73 year old trying to keep up with the world of social media. The basic marketing principles still apply and I appreciate your reinforcement.

  • Jim Drake

    This is very helpful to a 73 year old trying to keep up with the world of social media. The basic marketing principles still apply and I appreciate your reinforcement.

  • http://www.benchmarkemail.com/resources/email-marketing-articles/Opt-In-Email-Vs.-Bulk-Email-Spam Opt In Email Marketing

    I think most people are kinda looking for a magic bullet to grow their business. Social Media is the new focus for these people. But the useful application of the opportunities provided by such media requires more effort than most are willing to put into it and they end up making a very unfocused and random effort using FB, Twitter, Linked In, etc., and when those efforts inevitably fail, they blame these services rather than their own laziness. Thanks, Chris, for the helpful info.

  • Clive H

    How come I feel that this was written especially for me? Thanks Chris. Can’t wait for the rest of the “series”.

  • Preetam Kaushik

    Nice post Chris! I am fairly new to this world of social media and looking forward to understanding this dynamic platform in my own ways (without any practical business approach). But your posts are really helpful and this one’s really has some great information, especially if you talk about organizing goals. Very few take social media in broader context. Waiting for the rest.’Thanks Chris :)

  • http://www.online-business-virtual-assistant.com/ Virtual office assistant

    Thanks for this great post Chris!!!!
    I am in a learning process of this Social media and i dont have anyone to guide me in this area. Your posts are the one i read to get to know about it.Social media is the effective way of connecting with potential customers.

  • http://wptv.jobing.com/jobfair_company.asp?i=13481 Alfonso Fanjul

    Social Media is the new focus for these people. But the useful application of the opportunities provided by such media requires more effort than most are willing to put into it and they end up making a very unfocused and random effort using FB, Twitter, Linked In, etc., are also helpful.

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  • http://www.goingpublic.us/ going public

    Chris great work!  I am fairly new to this world of social media and looking forward to understanding this dynamic platform in my own ways (without any practical business approach). But your posts are really helpful and this one’s really has some great information, especially if you talk about organizing goals. 

  • http://www.thewebshop.ca Matthew Shepherd

    I keep coming back to this article Chris. Looking forward to Part 2. Thanks!

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