Diets Start on Monday

Scale-A-Week: 5 July 2010

Why are Mondays so powerful? Is it because work for most people begins on Monday? And is that really true any more? In the world of information and knowledge workers, it doesn’t feel true. We work all weekend. We work when our significant others are looking the other way. We answer emails while pushing the kids on the swing on the weekend. And yet, Monday seems to be the king day for “I’m starting something and I’m going to stick with it this time,” isn’t it?

Diets Start On Monday

I’ve been rethinking a lot about how I do what I do. After years of people saying things like, “I don’t know how you manage it all,” the real and honest answer is, “I’m not managing it all. I’m failing at lots of it.” And that comes from trying to juggle far too many connections, too many business opportunities, too much of everything. Abundance is often a word that means something positive, but for me, it’s been far too much.

It’s already started. On Facebook, I’m working on unfollowing/unfriending lots of people who aren’t my actual family or close friends. I’ve got about 3000 still to go, and it’s really slow clunky work. FB doesn’t make it easy to do. But I’ve shifted to maintaining a (not a fan) page instead, so that I can share stuff with you, but keep my personal social network just that: personal.

In doing this, I’ve found that about 95% of people understand immediately why I’m taking back my personal page. The 5% who don’t tend to complain that I’m too big for my britches, or that it’s not as personal, and all kinds of things that say “I want super duper insider access to you and I’m offended that you don’t want it.” The thing is, why do we all think being a Facebook friend is the same as having insider access? Why do we equate “friending” with being friends?

(The answer is, of course, that most people don’t. Only we online weirdos seem to suffer from these feelings.)

Chris NO-gan

I’ve been working on saying no a lot more in business. I have to focus on projects like Kitchen Table Companies and 501 Mission Place and Third Tribe Marketing, and, of course, my professional speaker work. Part of this is learning to say no to really great ideas and introductions that people want to make for me.

It’s really hard to decline an introduction. What happens is that someone will email me and email the person they want me to meet and then they’ll explain why we should know each other. The other person will invariably give me a wonderful email that says what they’re doing, and it will always sound really interesting. Only now, I have to respond that I’m buried and that I can’t really take on any new things right now. It’s a crappy thing to have to say to someone enthusiastic, especially if I’m the person that can be really helpful to them. Instead, I try to refer people as often as possible. This is a work in progress.

Input Diet

I don’t watch the news or read newspapers. I don’t read news blogs. Instead, I let ambient sources filter the news to my brain a little bit at a time. Someone will say “blah blah Afghanistan” and I’ll sniff around for some sources, if I want more. I’m writing this from the airport and CNN is advertising some murder trial. It sounds horrific. I don’t understand why we all want to feast on this kind of news. I’d rather watch TED in my downtime, and I would rather find inspiration instead of seek out suffering.

Randomly reading tweets and clicking though links isn’t working for me these days, either. I have cut my Twitter usage dramatically. Partly, I’m working on rediscovering the world outside the glass. Partly, I’m rethinking what I come to Twitter to do. Some of what I do is promotional. I have business to attend. Part of what I do is connecting with people about off-topic stuff. Yesterday, I talked about the new XMen movie. Why? Because we can’t all keep our work face on all the time. That’s not how business is done these days.

Not Time for “I Told You So”

Some people will want to say, “I knew what he was doing was unsustainable.” The thing is, you can sustain anything. The problem with that is that it comes with a cost. I’ve been losing touch with a lot of my life by focusing so hard on connecting and work. What value is connecting if you’re pushing fractions of your attention out to tens of thousands instead of building something of value with a few hundred?

Don’t misread this: having nearly 200,000 followers on Twitter isn’t my problem. Trying to actually build strong and meaningful connections all over creation is the problem. It doesn’t work. There’s one thing with connecting and getting ambient connectivity. It’s another thing to try your hardest to satisfy the intentions and wants of everyone who can reach me via a digital means.

Did I bring all this on myself? Is this “the price of fame” as people say to me when I write posts like this? Sure, if you want to call it that. But really, what I’ve been doing, is experimenting on the frontier. I’ve been learning new ways of doing business. I’ve learned a lot.

That learning came at a cost. I failed in lots of ways over the past few years. But I’m going to own those failures, and I’ll do what I can to make something come from even that, if I can. It’s all you can do at times like that.

Are You Aware of Your Consumption?

I’m not going to preach. I’m still absorbing the lessons. But are you aware of how often you’re connected? Are you thinking through what this costs? Are you considering how you can balance it better? Do you have a plan in place for what you’re doing or not doing with personal connections?

Some things to think about.

Oh, and you’re doing it wrong.

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  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    My only concern has always ever been, “why does this guy beat himself up so much?”

    I think folks like you, Brian Clark, Darren Rouse, Guy Kawasaki, and others are like the Social Media Beatles. A lot of people have come out and said that John Lennon was a hypocrite because while he was out there preaching peace and love, he barely knew his son’s age. And they are full of all kinds of other criticisms too. But if you were 22 and suddenly the most famous guy in the world – if you had fans climbing into your aunt’s house to steal cups you drank out of by 25 – wouldn’t you kind of go crazy a little?

    We have no idea, because we haven’t been there.

    Likewise, I have no idea what it’s like to be you in the Social Media world. I get pretty slap-happy sometimes when I think that 100 people a day (or so) are reading words on my website. In fact, I get slap-happy when I think that there’s a margieclayman website. I mean, geeze! You? You’ve been getting those slap-happy moments for years now – because you strike me as a person who would likewise be wowed by all that is going on. But of course, there are people who still say, “Well, I would handle that differently.” They can’t really know that because folks like you and Brian are dealing with the online world in a way that probably none of the rest of us will have to deal with it. Ever.

    You will always hear the nay-sayers loudest for as long as you are nay-saying yourself. It’s simple math. Or science. One of those.

    Oh, and nobody’s perfect. That’s some breaking news you might wanna check out :)

  • Anonymous

    I agree with Marjorie Clayman, Chris – you beat yourself up for not being superman. It’s all a work in progress, whether you’re Chris Brogan or Guy Kawasaki or Marjorie Clayman or me. We take on everything, then jettison some, then realize we cannot please everyone, so we must please ourselves and the ones we love. Life is like a box of chocolates, and sometimes you have to say “no thank you”.

  • http://www.retirepreneur.com Donna Kastner/Retirepreneur

    Wow – I feel compelled to comment, but not sure what to say…

    Does it help to know you’ve inspired many (including this solo-preneur) to stay focused, to persevere, and do the RIGHT things in the RIGHT way?

    Does it help to know that today’s post will cause many to spin their wheels a little less and laser in on “stuff” that’s more meaningful?

    Speaking gig = $XXXXX…. Client projects = $ZZZZZZ… Inspiring others to pursue their TRUE calling and make it happen = Priceless

    Many thanks!

  • http://www.alisonlaw.com/lawthenticityblog Alison Law

    Yea, you’re screwed up like the rest of us! That’s a relief. Live your life without apologies – start with one Monday –  maybe you’ll begin to unburden yourself of a lot of the mental weight. At least that’s what I’ve been told. I’m far from figuring it out, too. P.S. Love this line about news consumption: “I would rather find inspiration instead of seek out suffering.”

  • http://twitter.com/NancyD68 Nancy Davis

    I have no idea what it must be like to be you either. I get pretty damn excited when someone I admire calls my blog “inspirational” and “uplifting” that is pretty cool.

    At the moment, I have about 400 or so followers on Twitter, and some days it can be tough to keep up with conversations on Twitter, find relevant content to put up on my client’s Facebook page, take care of my son, and make time for my boyfriend (who is actually extremely supportive of me) Some days I totally fail at balancing everything.

    Today I am only working until 12:45. Then I am going to my son’s spelling bee. I blogged about him today. He is growing up so fast, and I don’t want to lose sight of the fact that he will only be young once.

    I think you are doing a fine job balancing, BTW – I don’t know how you do it all, but Margie is right – GIVE YOURSELF A BREAK CHRIS!

  • Anonymous

    Well put. And you can’t see but I am standing and applauding for you Chris. As your friend and a ‘media embracer’ – I ‘get it’

    Takes courage to admit ‘hey, something could be working better’ – especially when it flies somewhat in the face of your platform. Love it.

    Critics be hanged. Do what works for you. Your family. Your business. Your life. Your sanity.

    (but FYI, I started my diet on a Thursday) ;)

    Carrie

  • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

    I thought this was going to give me another Veggie special… I have to agree with @twitter-117500958:disqus , @MargieClayman:disqus , @f6c4eb6882adaefd4f49a2206630bcf6:disqus , @Retirepreneur:disqus  and @laineyd7:disqus you are being to hard on yourself. 

    One thing I love about Monday’s is that is starts the week and since many people (not me) see it that way it opens there minds to new ideas to the opportunity of me creating a business relationship or a project. 

    It is great that you are analyzing all of this and decide to put those input filters which I try to do also but being yourself. Saying no is part of it I am also saying no a smaller scale to people that are only looking out for themselves and make it look like they are really interested in engaging with you for your benefit. 

    Have a great week in San Francisco! 

  • Anonymous

    Great post Chris.  I really appreciate your insights and your willingness to share, on a granular level, the questions you ask yourself.  Make it a great day!

  • http://KolbeMarket.com BarbaraKB

    Chris, we all love you for your continual revamping and reassessing: it’s what we ALL need to do. Facebook? Heck, we know how much you dislike Facebook so it’s really best to grab your mind and thoughts elsewhere anyway!

    And yet, thanks for always taking the time to write about the “always connected” problem. Those of us who have been connected for *SO LONG* appreciate your openness about the struggle. We know: the answer is not another virtual assistant or better social media plan. 

    Have a wonderful Monday and be sure to eat a LOVELY salad for your Monday diet needs!

    Peace.

  • http://www.wildwomannetwork.com SandraLeeSchubert, Get heard.

    Chris, personally I don’t think you are beating up on yourself, but, rethinking where you are and pointing yourself in the direction where you want to go. I have clients that are really private and want to get into the social media game, but not at the expense of their privacy. Since they are just starting I have them create their personal profile and limit it to friends. Then I have them create a page for everyone else. I tell them not to apologize about who gets invited to what profile and if someone does complain the page is clearly the correct option for them. 

    My FB issue is the reverse I started my account purely for business reasons over three years ago before pages were popular. It was just people I was meeting at events, colleagues, etc. 

    Then my family got on and now it is a mess. There are dumb goofy conversations I want to have with my friends that I don’t really need or want my colleagues to see. What you see is what you get but that doesn’t mean I want to share everything with everyone. Should I kick my family off my personal profile? That would be a really funny way to go. I can just see those reunions now. 

    I woke up this morning realizing a big flaw in how I am setting myself up in business. Grateful it is Monday and I can reevaluate. 

  • http://www.wildwomannetwork.com SandraLeeSchubert, Get heard.

    Chris, personally I don’t think you are beating up on yourself, but, rethinking where you are and pointing yourself in the direction where you want to go. I have clients that are really private and want to get into the social media game, but not at the expense of their privacy. Since they are just starting I have them create their personal profile and limit it to friends. Then I have them create a page for everyone else. I tell them not to apologize about who gets invited to what profile and if someone does complain the page is clearly the correct option for them. 

    My FB issue is the reverse I started my account purely for business reasons over three years ago before pages were popular. It was just people I was meeting at events, colleagues, etc. 

    Then my family got on and now it is a mess. There are dumb goofy conversations I want to have with my friends that I don’t really need or want my colleagues to see. What you see is what you get but that doesn’t mean I want to share everything with everyone. Should I kick my family off my personal profile? That would be a really funny way to go. I can just see those reunions now. 

    I woke up this morning realizing a big flaw in how I am setting myself up in business. Grateful it is Monday and I can reevaluate. 

  • http://www.wildwomannetwork.com SandraLeeSchubert, Get heard.

    Chris, personally I don’t think you are beating up on yourself, but, rethinking where you are and pointing yourself in the direction where you want to go. I have clients that are really private and want to get into the social media game, but not at the expense of their privacy. Since they are just starting I have them create their personal profile and limit it to friends. Then I have them create a page for everyone else. I tell them not to apologize about who gets invited to what profile and if someone does complain the page is clearly the correct option for them. 

    My FB issue is the reverse I started my account purely for business reasons over three years ago before pages were popular. It was just people I was meeting at events, colleagues, etc. 

    Then my family got on and now it is a mess. There are dumb goofy conversations I want to have with my friends that I don’t really need or want my colleagues to see. What you see is what you get but that doesn’t mean I want to share everything with everyone. Should I kick my family off my personal profile? That would be a really funny way to go. I can just see those reunions now. 

    I woke up this morning realizing a big flaw in how I am setting myself up in business. Grateful it is Monday and I can reevaluate. 

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/micjohnson MicJohnson

    Wel

  • http://www.linkedin.com/in/micjohnson MicJohnson

    Well said, Chris. Your post is completely and entirely rational and I’m glad to see you have gotten to this place…you are clearly on the right path. The work/life balance is called a balance for a reason…and it takes time and real effort to cultivate. Being able to say no…and to listen to your body…your family…and any other signs that you need to slow down….just makes for a better you. For yourself, for your family, for your friends, for your clients. Congrats!

  • http://rickmanelius.com Rick Manelius

    Saying no is critical to preventing overwhelm. Sometimes I lack the discipline to do this, so I rely on software like freedom (google freedom app) to force off my internet connection off for 10 minutes to several hours.

    And no, this is definitely not “I told you so.” I admire someone with the determination to go big. Better to dream big than stay home! 

  • Anonymous

    Chris, I have made similar mistakes and I think laser like focus on the stuff that drives your business will get the best results. Maintaining too many balls in the air will do just that, keep them in the air.  

    I made a mistake with Facebook,. I seems like I was one in 400 million who didn’t actually want a Facebook page but wanted a “fan” page for my company. Like an idiot, i did it in a rush and called my home page BigRedTomato (the same as my Twitter ID) then realised that I couldn’t use it as my Fan Page name. So I have a stack of people following me, when they should be following my Fan Page. It feels sort of rude to ask them to move.

    I have made the conscious effort that I don’t do work at the weekends (except Sunday evening). I do check emails on  my iPhone but invariably I don’t respond.

    Like you I’ve cut back on what I read and listen to. I spend time in the car quite a bit and never listen to the radio. I hardly listen to music, but I do listen to lots and lots of business podcasts. I’ve even joined audible to get book downloads.

    Every minute needs to be useful, I don’t have enough time with the family as it is, so making more time for them is paramount.

    Matthew

  • Anonymous

    Chris, I have made similar mistakes and I think laser like focus on the stuff that drives your business will get the best results. Maintaining too many balls in the air will do just that, keep them in the air.  

    I made a mistake with Facebook,. I seems like I was one in 400 million who didn’t actually want a Facebook page but wanted a “fan” page for my company. Like an idiot, i did it in a rush and called my home page BigRedTomato (the same as my Twitter ID) then realised that I couldn’t use it as my Fan Page name. So I have a stack of people following me, when they should be following my Fan Page. It feels sort of rude to ask them to move.

    I have made the conscious effort that I don’t do work at the weekends (except Sunday evening). I do check emails on  my iPhone but invariably I don’t respond.

    Like you I’ve cut back on what I read and listen to. I spend time in the car quite a bit and never listen to the radio. I hardly listen to music, but I do listen to lots and lots of business podcasts. I’ve even joined audible to get book downloads.

    Every minute needs to be useful, I don’t have enough time with the family as it is, so making more time for them is paramount.

    Matthew

  • http://aspindle.com tannerc

    When it’s effortlessly easy to say yes — to friend requests, to followers, to writing gigs, to adding a feature, to picking up the kids, to changing plans — the real power comes from our ability to say no.

    Good on you Chris, thanks for being an inspiration.

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  • http://www.fromdreamstolifestyle.com Patrick

     It takes a great deal of strength to let go of all of the activities we focus on and to do the few that really matter. Building up the strength to say no and going on an information diet can be some of the best ways to gain more time and alleviate stress.

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  • http://livingthebalancedlife.com Bernice Wood

    It is a constant struggle and one that we have to be ever vigilant about, as connecting for business and for life is so crucial, but those connections can become overwhelming if we are not careful.
    I have worked hard to find the balance, which means I am not involved in every form of social media. I read many blogs via reader and only comment if I have something to offer, otherwise it is a quick skim and on to the next one.
    I so agree with you about the news. I never watch online or on TV unless something major grabs my attention (like the tornadoes).
    Good luck with your diet! I started a “real” diet today, lol!
    Bernice

  • http://livingthebalancedlife.com Bernice Wood

    It is a constant struggle and one that we have to be ever vigilant about, as connecting for business and for life is so crucial, but those connections can become overwhelming if we are not careful.
    I have worked hard to find the balance, which means I am not involved in every form of social media. I read many blogs via reader and only comment if I have something to offer, otherwise it is a quick skim and on to the next one.
    I so agree with you about the news. I never watch online or on TV unless something major grabs my attention (like the tornadoes).
    Good luck with your diet! I started a “real” diet today, lol!
    Bernice

  • http://livingthebalancedlife.com Bernice Wood

    It is a constant struggle and one that we have to be ever vigilant about, as connecting for business and for life is so crucial, but those connections can become overwhelming if we are not careful.
    I have worked hard to find the balance, which means I am not involved in every form of social media. I read many blogs via reader and only comment if I have something to offer, otherwise it is a quick skim and on to the next one.
    I so agree with you about the news. I never watch online or on TV unless something major grabs my attention (like the tornadoes).
    Good luck with your diet! I started a “real” diet today, lol!
    Bernice

  • http://twitter.com/danatucker danatucker

    This is a very timely post for me. I am having to also say, “no” to lots of opportunities that sound great. I’ve had to refocus on 2-3 things that are making the most money. That means letting the things pass by that I would rather be working on, but will take time to build and nurture before they make money. I’m trying to make a conscious decision to be present in the moment when I am spending time with my family. I’m putting down the iphone, shutting down the computer and giving them spurts of my full attention. I have to say your post really resonated with me. Thanks for always speaking the truth.  

  • http://www.profkrg.com Kenna Griffin

    You had me until “I don’t read newspapers.” You don’t have to read newspapers, but active information consumption is the key to an informed democracy. I disagree with the idea of waiting for the news to find you. You must seek out the information you need to be free and self-governing, regardless of the source.

  • Jelena

    When you have a lot in your minds, that
    “secretary “in your brain just can’t keep the
    “administration” good way. And you going to be confused and can’t
    focus on anything anymore.

    It is a must, to make selection, and this is really
    great way to explain to everybody, what’s going on.

    Respect for it! :)

    Focus on things you need and find important. And btw,
    your son growing fast and that time you just can’t get back.

    Also by following your work, everyone can learn
    something and by that way, you can also help other. Take your time to do what
    you need to do; one day you will find some time also for other things. 

    Jelena

    P.S. This show, that you are not superficial. Nice :)

  • Jelena

    When you have a lot in your minds, that
    “secretary “in your brain just can’t keep the
    “administration” good way. And you going to be confused and can’t
    focus on anything anymore.

    It is a must, to make selection, and this is really
    great way to explain to everybody, what’s going on.

    Respect for it! :)

    Focus on things you need and find important. And btw,
    your son growing fast and that time you just can’t get back.

    Also by following your work, everyone can learn
    something and by that way, you can also help other. Take your time to do what
    you need to do; one day you will find some time also for other things. 

    Jelena

    P.S. This show, that you are not superficial. Nice :)

  • http://www.netwitsthinktank.com frank barry

    Amen dude Amen.

  • Megan

    LOVE this!  It’s so important to “weed out” things out in your life from time to time and truly focus on people and things that are close to your heart!

  • http://twitter.com/susangiurleo susangiurleo

    Yay, you. Quality wins over quantity every time.  And growing and blazing new trails is hard work. When there’s no path, we get lost sometimes, but it’s ok to double back and start again.

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  • Al Pittampalli

    You’re right, Chris.  There’s simply too much clutter.  That clutter feeds the resistance.  Focus, focus, focus on doing the work that truly matters.  Relax and wander.  Then focus again.

  • http://declandunn.com Declan Dunn

    You mean the power in business is not how many you know, but the quality of those connections? Kudos on not only implementing this yourself, but remembering that the significant relationships people remember are maybe 100-150 tops…more is not always better, and less sometimes is more…

    You remind me of an old Jeff Bezos quotation, the job of a CEO is to say no. And you are one of the few people I say yes to, and thank you…

  • @RunnerBliss (Claudene)

    I use Mondays as power days, too. 

    And where I really need more power is in the phrase “stick with it” (at the end of the first paragraph).

    What I mean by that is, I need my definition of “stick with it” to have some shades of meaning to it, some gradation. 

    Why?  So I don’t go all black-or-white, all-or-nothing on myself. I need to allow myself a slightly forgiving defintion of “stick with it” so I don’t feel like I’m totally starting over again, after slip-ups.

    The day that I truly allow myself that slightly forgiving definition, *that* will be a powerful day.  It might even be a Monday.  It might even be today.

    Awesome post!  Thank you.

  • @RunnerBliss (Claudene)

    I use Mondays as power days, too. 
     
    And where I really need more power is in the phrase “stick with it” (at the end of the first paragraph).
     
    What I mean by that is, I need my definition of “stick with it” to have some shades of meaning to it, some gradation. 
     
    Why?  So I don’t go all black-or-white, all-or-nothing on myself. I need to allow myself a slightly forgiving defintion of “stick with it” so I don’t feel like I’m totally starting over again, after slip-ups.
     
    The day that I truly allow myself that slightly forgiving definition, *that* will be a powerful day.  It might even be a Monday.  It might even be today, thanks to your post.  
     
    Awesome stuff. Thank you.

  • http://www.ricardobueno.com Ricardo Bueno

    First off, love the “you’re doing it wrong” post.

    Lately, I’ve been taking into account my consumption. Where I’m spending my time and where I should be spending my time to do the work that matters. I’m up to 1 post per day on my company blog and 2-3 posts per week on my own personal blog. That doesn’t include daily webinars, podcasts and all the other stuff that I’m doing to try and make our company blog the Hubspot of the Real Estate Industry.

    It’s hard work. And if I really want for it to continue to grow at the pace it’s growing (if not faster), I need to rethink my consumption to again, focus on the work that inches me closer to my goals. Nothing wrong with that at all.

  • http://www.mynotetakingnerd.com/blog Lewis LaLanne aka Nerd #2

    What a humongous relief it was not to log into Facebook for 90 days.

    Anyone I truly had friendships with or business with could get me on my phone. What was wonderful about this was that none of my minds RAM was consumed with how someone might of responded to a link I posted or a comment I left or if I decided not to leave a comment. Whew!

    Then I came back after my 90 day challenge and jumped on the hamster wheel again. And, since, I’ve come to the realization that when I don’t check in for a couple of days, I get huge relief. What I really need to work on though is being completely unattached to what response I get on there.

    That’s where the power is. Not giving a f*** what anyone says or thinks, knowing I’m coming from a pure heart and knowing not everyone is going to appreciate my opinion and knowing this is the way it’s supposed to be.

    I’m glad to see you’re taking control of your Facebook page. It seems like that strategy allows you to really mine the gold out of it that the site truly promises. May you chip away at the 3000 steadily and surely. :)

  • http://twitter.com/rosiemedia Rosie Taylor

    Chris – I think you are providing a valuable lesson here on many levels.  What you do is incredible. You humanize business and you bring inspiration to small biz owners.  What you don’t need to do is apologize.  Failing is part of your pioneering.  Culling what doesn’t work for you is smart.  You have major projects to focus on like Third Tribe and 501. We would all do well to learn how to similarly focus on the things that matter and shed those that just drain our time and energy. I’ve followed you for years and the one thing I can always count on is your thought leadership. Keep pushing that envelope!

  • http://mogostyle.com Raiman Au

    Seems like growing is all about learning what to say “no” to!

  • Iforget@gmail.com

    I admire that in you. The ability to look at failures and just walk away. But not sacrifice something just because it became trickier. It’s important to be able to see the difference between them

    I guess it’s what’s worth your time and effort and what isn’t. Family is something you value and so it might be worth that extra effort. Or not. I won’t assume that everyone feels that way.

    Maybe it’s just us :)

    • Robin Mallery

      Hmmm, may I just say Iforget, that I view this as success — for Chris and for us — and not failure… that’s just me.

    • Robin Mallery

      Hmmm, may I just say Iforget, that I view this as success — for Chris and for us — and not failure… that’s just me.

  • Alex Osen

    Since I am just super brand new blogger, I don’t have the same problems, I guess. I do work full time and try find consistency in my new blog, while moonlighting as a father of 19 month old. Long story short, long time ago, I worked as a store manager and one thing I learned well is motivation and delegation. Worked even at $8/hour, provided the foundation was strong.

    Can some of the projects (parts) that keep you strained be delegated? Am I way off the mark here?

    Also, what helps me a lot is going camping and fishing – total and complete reset. We can still enjoy a bit land where the cell towers are not.

    Hoping to see you at the conference tomorrow.

    cheers

  • http://dreambox-dvb.com/ Dreambox

    Diet plan is all about making healthy recipes that protect your body and help leading a healthy life.  Diet is very important and necessary for a healthy body and a healthy mind. Diet is a best way to loss the Weight.

  • Anonymous

    And they end on Tuesday ;) Thanks for joining me in The Experiment, Chris. What took you so long???

    Setting all seriousness aside, I think God had it right when He rested on the seventh day.  Work six, rest one. Wash, rinse, repeat. There might be more on this….. #fb

    PS, I know I’m doing it wrong, but if this is wrong, I don’t wanna be right….

  • http://ClimbingEveryMountain.com Mary E. Ulrich

    Chris, I love that you share your thoughts. One of the reasons you are a great leader is you help us think through the lessons of life. You have 200,000 followers, of course you are going to have challenges, the rest of us with under 2000 followers, can’t even imagine. You are pointing out the speed bumps–charting the course.

    Thanks. You are helping us all learn and evolve.

  • Paula

    Thank you for sharing your responses to the never ending onslaught of information in today’s times. I have found that I need to be extremely clear about what’s important to me, my business, and my life and then radically cut out those activities, blogs, relationships, readings etc. that don’t support these goals. I am also trying very hard NOT to multitask even though it can sometimes be very difficult.  For example, I attended a webinar this morning and had the strong desire to read emails and surf the web while listening.  How stupid is that?  I signed up for this webinar and that should be the sole focus on my hour – otherwise, why do it?  It’s activities like that which I am thoughtfully trying to deal with.  Good luck to Steve and all the others on this road to sanity with me.

  • http://www.central-e-commerce.com Gabriella – The Stepford Wife

    You are so right…. diets are always started on a Monday. I’d always say ‘This is my last weekend of Junk food… Monday will be when I diet’ – as if that ever came. :p I  think Monday just seems like the day after the weekend (should we just single out Sunday?) where we’re fully productive and ready to go, go and go!

  • Robin Mallery

    Powerful post, Chris. I applaud you for having the insight, and finding the ability to define and refocus on what matters in the long run (yes, a work in progress). You have found the ability to articulate, with graciousness, your personal opportunity to live with balance and meaning as primary considerations. Bravo.

    I did wonder how you “did it” — find time for the communications, projects, speaking engagements — and I am quite pleased that you are stating your truth to those that follow your writings. This message is sent from your heart, and from my place in the world, it elicits empathy and admiration.

    As you have set the tone for many a business conversation, I hope now that the conversation will shift…even just a bit. Great stuff here, thank you.

  • Robin Mallery

    Powerful post, Chris. I applaud you for having the insight, and finding the ability to define and refocus on what matters in the long run (yes, a work in progress). You have found the ability to articulate, with graciousness, your personal opportunity to live with balance and meaning as primary considerations. Bravo.

    I did wonder how you “did it” — find time for the communications, projects, speaking engagements — and I am quite pleased that you are stating your truth to those that follow your writings. This message is sent from your heart, and from my place in the world, it elicits empathy and admiration.

    As you have set the tone for many a business conversation, I hope now that the conversation will shift…even just a bit. Great stuff here, thank you.

  • http://hannahsharvest.com Hannah Marcotti

    You realize that this is only going to bring you like another 3,000 followers!!!!!?????

    Love the honesty Chris. I’ve been really busy in wonderful ways with my very tiny online tribe and my very busy at home tribe. I haven’t even been able to read your posts for a while. Glad I found time to read this today. It is beautiful to continue to know that this online work can be done with such truth and evolution.