How Connections Really Form

Kyle McGuffin I had a great conversation with Kyle McGuffin about something he’s interested in, and in the process, I learned a few things about Kyle. He’s a loving father who really appreciates his girls. He’s a former national level athlete who represented his whole country in soccer. And he knows a lot of the same people I know.

Kyle’s last name, McGuffin, means something like an object or something that’s used as a major plot trigger. “What’s in the case? You’ve gotta return whatever’s in the case. Oh no! They’ve sent assassins to retrieve the case.” (The case is the McGuffin). He was surprised that I knew what the word meant (I learned it because it was a major favorite method of Alfred Hitchcock).

On all and any of these points (and a few more), Kyle and I were able to find connections and bonds. I have some enterprise technology background that connects us. We both have a passion for the digital channel.

What I left the conversation thinking was this:

Business, when done right, feels like a great conversation where we learn about each other, and where we finish it off by deciding to do it again sometimes.

This gets missed. It gets missed when we’re fighting to hit a number. It gets missed when we get rushed. It gets missed for myriad reasons. But that’s not how it has to be. HUMAN business is about making connections with the people you intend to work with that leave you feeling like you hope you know the person long after any actual business has transacted.

When you’re fortunate to serve the community you love, that’s what happens.

Now, imagine telling this to someone whose job it is to dial 25-50 people a day and book ten appointments. Imagine selling this mindset to a company who is watching its revenue get eaten on all sides. There’s nothing easy about pushing for a relationship-minded business core. And yet, it’s how things get done best in my experience.

Great talking with you, Kyle, and this post? Well, maybe it’s the McGuffin in our story.

Special thanks to Forbes magazine for naming Human Business Works one of the 100 Best Websites for Entrepreneurs.

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  • Dan Erickson

    In 2014 I’ll be quitting blogging for numbers.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com/ Chris Brogan

      Swell!

      • Dan Erickson

        I lived in Saco when I was a kid.

  • Tom Smith

    Your point about building connections rings true. If we’re just into increasing numbers eventually it will just make us anxious. A relationship-minded business eventually is more effective in the long run.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com/ Chris Brogan

      Precisely. : ) Glad you saw it similarly. : )

  • merry

    Thank you for sharing this..

  • Pingback: Is 2014 the Year of Human Business? | Intranet Blog & Intranet Articles | Intranet Connections

  • http://www.relogeek.com/ Ashley

    New here and great post! Thats always been my objective when I started my business. I wrote in my business plan that I wanted to grow my business based on referrals and long term relationships. Even though the likelihood of someone moving more than once in a short period of time is slim, I want to remember them, why they moved, if they have kids and basically keep in touch. My clients mean the world to me but when you’re competing for business its easy to want to do things with money in mind first- but this post was needed to remind me why i do what I do and what my goals are. Thanks Chris!

  • Anthony J. Alfidi

    The number and quality of connections add to a human’s node value in a network, just like in computer science. The commentary on human networking often misses the inherent advantages of someone who grew up in a family with high social status. The means to afford private schools, club memberships, and other special opportunities provides access to more high-quality human nodes. I predict networking will increasingly become something only the plutocrat class is able to do.

  • http://www.clabers.com/ clabers

    thanks a lot for nice articles!!

  • eautcoins.com

    Great!!!Hope you post more blogs!!