How Events Can Use Social Media

IMS09 Boston Crowd

I’m presenting to the International Association of Exhibitions and Events (IAEE) conference today. These people all put on conferences for a living, a multi-billion dollar industry (note: I also put on conferences), and work with an events solutions company. What they’ll want to know is how all these social media tools can improve attendance, drive collaboration, extend the value of events, without taking away any potential revenue. They’ll want a very safe path, tried and true, with a step by step understanding of what will add to the bottom line and how to avoid things that will detract.

After years of attending and running events, I can tell you that it’s all still very much a lab environment. That said, here’s what I know.

Social Media Buzzes Up Potential Attendance

Hooking Twitter to your registration system such that it tweets out a message like “I just registered for PodCamp Boston on Jun 14th. Are you coming? http://bit.ly/regpcbos” is a powerful way to get more attendance. Also distributing discount codes and early birds via that method is equally effective.

Jeff Pulver did a lot of his promotion and ticket sales via Twitter for his 140 Conference, but then again, that’s an event about Twitter and real-time social media tools of its kind. Would it work as well for a less technology-based show?

It’s hard to say. The demographics of people joining Facebook, for instance, are promising. 650,000 new people join a day, mostly within the age range of 31-55, a little more than half are women. If your show is less technology-focused, there’s still a potential that you could find attendees via Facebook, as people use the tool in many ways in their off time.

But don’t be too optimistic. I’ve yet to find reports or case studies of Facebook having as successful a conversion for attendance. If you build a fan page, it’s just another place to have to push eyeballs and hope for conversion. To the plus, there are more people visiting Facebook than your website. To the minus, they’re not as well targeted. There’s potential there, but it requires a lot of effort. And Facebook ads have shown mixed results.

What’s required is a kind of social media sherpa, who can find you the audience you seek, who can reach to them on the platforms where they are already congregating, and who can help promote in tasteful ways that fit the sensitivities of the networks where your audiences are found.

Social Media Extends Communities

There are a number of community platform tools in all price ranges that might appeal to conference organizers. Some are custom-built to tie into registration systems. Others are separate-but-robust and allow your attendees to build a profile, make meetings at the event, share media, and a whole host of other potential uses. The upside is that this gives organizers a new way to provide sponsors and exhibitors a new place to make relationships. It’s another potential property to advertise on.

To the downside, these communities are rarely heavily used. I’ve been made to sign up for them in the past (and “made to” is the key takeaway for you), and the return on effort wasn’t exactly there. They can appear to be ghost towns, which might drag down the experience of the attendees and send false signals to all involved. Some are costly and require a lot of customization before putting them into practice.

Here’s the thing about communities, bottom line: if you’re going to build one, realize that you need a community manager capable of making content, capable of keeping the “cocktail party environment” going on the site, and capable of understanding potential business introductions of value that would give all involved some yield for being there.

Video and Audio Materials Drive Awareness

Creating video for a YouTube or other video channel of your best presentations is a great way to build awareness of the event, and a way to give your sales team something to talk about when calling up prospects. It’s also a great way to help prospective attendees realize what they could see at the event. Consider the difference between a printed brochure with a bunch of heads on it versus a series of video posts that show highlights or the entire presentation of past presenters.

There are lots of great ways to use video and audio materials to drum up business. Rick Calvert and Jim Turner did this expertly for Blog World Expo, including creating many anticipatory audio podcast experiences. The double benefit of how Rick and Jim did it was that they got their influential speakers to do these pre-show activities and then those were promoted to some extent, thus driving even more potential sign-up.

Here’s where most show organizers worry that they’re giving away the show, and that they can make money on after-show DVD sales. If you’re making a killing on that business, then don’t listen to me. However, I’ve rarely seen many people tell me with a straight face that their after-show DVD sales are a huge stream of revenue, or that the prospect of trading that stream for more paying attendees wasn’t a worthwhile trade-off.

Remember: this video and audio material makes for good sales lead conversational material, not just attendee awareness.

And just sticking the video on YouTube doesn’t mean you’ll have someone knocking down the door. We can talk about all the various elements that need to go into it, including calls to action and the like, but that’ll be another time.

Nothing Is a Slam Dunk, But It All Can Work

After years of experimentation with the various shows I produce or collaborate on, there are lots of ways that social media tools can add to the experience, and there are lots of ways that it can go horribly wrong. The positives are that shows extended by social media get talked about more, get more coverage, get more exposure, and have better potential to grow using non-traditional marketing methods. The negatives are that bad news travels fast.

All in all, the recommendation is to work with someone who understands and can build the strategy around the tools, instead of just throwing a bunch of tools together that you read about in various places. There are no shortcuts to building social media into events, but the yield from taking an intelligent approach is very much worth it.

I’m always happy to talk with you about how events can be extended. Drop me a line on my contact form and I’ll get back soon.

How Have You Seen It Done, Good or Bad?

What are the ways you’ve seen companies attempt to use social media in events, and what do you like or dislike about it?

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  • http://twitter.com/mistressmia Mistress Mia

    People in your network may not be your target for an event, they may be an influencer. Present the message appropriately.

  • http://spenserbaldwin.com/ Spenser

    Excellent article Chris. I appreciate your honesty and insight.

  • http://spenserbaldwin.com/ Spenser

    Excellent article Chris. I appreciate your honesty and insight.

  • http://twitter.com/Jericles Jeremy Fischer

    Chris,

    Twitter honestly has become both a good and bad for me with conferences/meetings, etc. On the good side, I love it when I have colleagues/friends that are attending something I couldn't make tweet from the event. I always feel like I'm a little bit apart of it, and that I'm receiving great bits of info. from the conference.

    However, it's personally bad for me when I try to tweet from an event that I'm attending. I always leave the event feeling like I didn't retain enough of the information myself because instead of concentrating and writing down notes for myself, I was tweeting something out as soon as I heard something great.

    Just a thought.

  • http://blog.poplabs.com mayhemchaos

    When promoting the Interactive Strategies Conference in Houston, we went for the “green” effort by not using ANY print to promote. We relied solely on social media, email campaigns (with humor – not straight promo material) and Eventbrite for that Twitter integration. More conferences should take a more social approach to promoting.

  • samueljsmith

    Hi Chris,

    Your point that you need to start with a strategy is probably the most important. The reality is that there is no-one-sized-fits-all recipe to social media marketing for events. You have to know “where” your attendees are using social media and “how” they prefer to engage with it.

    I see a lot of people that are looking for a “quick fix” and get distracted by the latest tools. It's like shiny object syndrome.

    A better way would probably be to create “sharable content” (case studies, ebooks, videos, webinars, etc) that can be passed around to like minded people and potential attendees. Even this approach is not one size fits all.

  • http://www.facebook.com/karkaremtg Mihir Karkare

    Interesting that you brought this up, Chris. My company, Social Wavelength was associated with the worlds first Industrial Green Chemistry Workshop (http://industrialgreenchem.com/), which took place in Mumbai over last weekend.
    Kudos to the team at Newreka (the people who organized the event) to recognize the the opportunity which Social Media presented, to get the green chemistry community, which is widely distributed geographically, together.
    In collaboration, we used a blogs, twitter, facebook, and most importantly LinkedIn to reach out to people from all across the world, who were interested in introducing concepts of sustainability to Industrial Chemistry.
    Over the day of the event, we live tweeted and webcasted (ustream) the proceedings, giving people who could not make it to the venue, the ability to follow the event online. All in all, the event was a big success, largely due to its visionary organizers, but ably supported by Social Media.
    What was very heartening to see, was that even in circles far removed from tech/web2.0 people are seeing the value of using Social Media for promoting events.

  • jeffcutler

    Some of the best events act as if they're viral. Am putting on Nogup2 (Second annual Nogup) in Boston this year and I only mentioned it to a few friends and tweeted it a couple times.

    In less than 48 hours we have 26 people confirmed.

    I think what really drives events is good content. Looking at two recent event – the Mega Tweetup and the WebInno night – and comparing them, the results were vastly different.

    Mega Tweetup was a big party and got about 400 people to go from some reports. It was pimped by some of the biggest Twitter concerns in Boston, had charities tied to it, promised world records and had a lot of schwag. ALSO offered a free drink ticket. And it got ONLY 400 people.

    On the other hand, Webinno – a night full of startups and VCs and technology specialists – with no free drinks, no giveaways, a cash bar, and cramped, standing-room-only spaces, got 1200 people to RSVP.

    What that tells me is two things. People like free and fun, but they're more hungry for real content and connections. It also tells me that social media promotion has a peak or a cutoff where attendance stops.

    Takeaway here is that schedules, desires and communication are all important when putting on an event, whether it be a little party or a real event with valuable content.

    Thanks for the post Chris.

    Jeff
    http://nogup2.eventbrite.com

  • jeffcutler

    Some of the best events act as if they're viral. Am putting on Nogup2 (Second annual Nogup) in Boston this year and I only mentioned it to a few friends and tweeted it a couple times.

    In less than 48 hours we have 26 people confirmed.

    I think what really drives events is good content. Looking at two recent event – the Mega Tweetup and the WebInno night – and comparing them, the results were vastly different.

    Mega Tweetup was a big party and got about 400 people to go from some reports. It was pimped by some of the biggest Twitter concerns in Boston, had charities tied to it, promised world records and had a lot of schwag. ALSO offered a free drink ticket. And it got ONLY 400 people.

    On the other hand, Webinno – a night full of startups and VCs and technology specialists – with no free drinks, no giveaways, a cash bar, and cramped, standing-room-only spaces, got 1200 people to RSVP.

    What that tells me is two things. People like free and fun, but they're more hungry for real content and connections. It also tells me that social media promotion has a peak or a cutoff where attendance stops.

    Takeaway here is that schedules, desires and communication are all important when putting on an event, whether it be a little party or a real event with valuable content.

    Thanks for the post Chris.

    Jeff
    http://nogup2.eventbrite.com

  • http://dsinsights.blogspot.com DavidWeinfeld

    Overall, it's really about leveraging the right tools, as opposed to every available social media platform, to connect with one's audience. I find it interesting that you didn't highlight Twitter usage during an event itself. I am curious to get your opinion on this as it can be a double-edged sword.

    Live tweets presented on large scale digital screens at an event can spark interesting, useful discussions; but can also become nothing more than a fertile attack ground for negative comments about the speaker. Active moderation can eliminate derogatory comments and streamline the discussion, but could hinder the free flow of comments. The personality and makeup of the audience determines the success of such a social media initiative.

    What are your thoughts on the subject?

  • jeffcutler

    Great point. The proper tools for the crowd says it all.

    Only stumbling block I see is when you're trying to get some legacy thinkers to adopt some new communication tools.

    Had that on the tip of my fingers and didn't type it.

    Good work David.

  • http://twitter.com/MikeMcCready MikeMcCready

    I went to a Stamats conference last November (actually, you were a keynote speaker there) and a Ning group was setup for the conference. I found that this was extremely valuable in connecting with others outside conference hours. Also I started following many of the attendees on Twitter and to this day stay connected with them.

    I would agree that social media tools can greatly improve the event experience.

  • BryanPerson

    Chris: Especially like your suggestion to include audio/video assets as part of your efforts to get people talking about the event. I've done this in past for some of the Social Media Breakfasts I've organized, and I've found it really helps gave potential attendees a flavor of what to expect at the event.

    Andy Sernovitz and GasPedal are doing something along those lines for their “Word of Mouth Supergenius” event in Chicago next week. Shortish audio interviews (about 5 minutes apiece, and embedded as a YouTube *videos*) with each of the speakers have been published over the past several weeks on the GP site, on Andy's blog, and on GP's Facebook Page.

  • http://www.retirepreneur.com Donna Kastner/Retirepreneur

    When you leverage the proper tools, Chris' concept of assigning a Community Manager who can create content, keep the “cocktail party” vibe going and make proper introductions is also key — great way to get those legacy thinkers into the mix.

  • http://www.marketlikeachick.com Coree

    Thanks for posting this article, Chris. I believe using social media to build an event community can make the difference of a making a less attended event become as viral as one of the biggies. If the event community is kept alive and popping by being fed behind the scenes peeks, exclusive interviews, or just entertaining video (Chad Vader pre-Blogworld video=hilarious), then the conversations are flowing and people want to know what all the talk is about.

    One of the things that is really surprising to me is how so many events will neglect a simple detail like including Twitter handles for all the keynote speakers. We all want to tweet valuable notes and give proper credit, but it takes away from the attendees attention to have to go look those up during a session.

    When I attended Blogworld, the best sessions were those that had their own identifiable hashtag. By using that the speakers were able to monitor what was being tweeted throughout the session, took questions, and guided the flow of the session by monitoring feedback.

    As an attendee I try to send out valuable content from an event to share with my community. Not only do my friends get value from the tips shared, but the value of the event itself is promoted to all those that weren't able to attend or were on the fence about attending next year.

    I recently published a few articles on just this subject and included tips from others like Jason Falls, Warren Whitlock and Mari Smith. (ummm…apparently I should have gotten YOUR tips too!) It just makes sense to make events as social media friendly as possible in a social world.

  • http://www.twitter.com/nathanrking NathanK

    Anticipatory content before an event is a must-have. Its a good bet that your local competitors will also be there. Getting an idea of the content ahead of time could give you a solid foot forward.

    Nathan
    http://www.twitter.com/NathanRKing

  • http://twitter.com/matthixson Matt Hixson

    I would agree that most registration/community sites are a ghost town. Even the SXSW site is not very active. A better question is how do you use SM during an event to create buzz outside of it for next year or for more engaged participants? One of the best was an impromptu #cake by Chris at SXSW last year. I thought it was great and gave the audience a platform to have a discussion during the panel.

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  • http://wildheavenfarm.com/ Mary Kroll

    Busch Gardens is making ideal use of their Facebook page during the first year of their Christmas Town event. Hundreds of people have commented and management is implementing changes this year, not next, and announcing them on the page.

  • drdavehale

    Hey there Chris, I just wrote your name in another blog comment on being responsible on social media sites. i mentioned your book Trust Agents, which I am reading.

    I was at BlogWorld where we talked. I was amazed at how they used Twitter feeds during the conference to break the Guiness record for Retweets, which made money for cancer research. Throughout all of the keynote speeches two huge jumbo trons on both sides of the screen streamed the hashmarked tweets. It was real funny the last day when the lead doll for The Pussy Cat Dolls was on a panel and did not have a clue what she was talking about. Little did she know the laughter from the audience was not directed at her far from whitty sense of humor, but at the tweets people were sending in.

    Your the Man, Chris Brogan. See you in Boston.

    Dr. Dave Hale
    The Internet Marketing Professor.

  • jsloss

    I'm excited to see how some of the new tools being cranked out these days can add value to conference goers.

    Twitter has always been a great way to connect with other conference goers, but at the same time is a huge P.I.T.A (pain in the … ) to follow conversations, especially in bigger, multi room events.

    That's why I'm excited to see how developers use Google's Wave API. As a collaboration tool, it could be awesome to gather a huge variety of ideas, opinions and conversations as they happen.

    Social Media and conferences better hold hands, it's a relationship that's only going to get better, faster and stronger. :)

  • http://JoselinMane.com JoselinMane

    Actually as you already know, 400 is a Microsoft size limitation and this why the MegaTweetUp was only promoted by the community after the first week it was announced.

    The New England Community ie tweeples from ME, NH, CT, RI & even NY sold out the event versus say an event promoter needing to put their event link in blog comments to gain visibility for their event.

    At one point over 100 tix were sold in less than 24hrs with no promotion from me, the event organizer, and this was all thanks to the community.

    What was great is that MegaTweetUp drew executives from Eventbrite, Radian6 and even Chris Brogan himself who was networking until the very end (11pmish).

    And as you know, Chris rarely attends any local events due to his high volume of travel so this just added to the numerous successes of that night.

    I can understand why you would tend to think that people are hungrier for content considering the social event you put together, along with a major local PR firm, various notable local celebrities, and Gary V, simply compelled 137 to sign up.

    Also MassInno (#24 as in yesterdays case), which has been running for the last 7yrs (4 per year), is not only a new project showcase but it has also become a great place for the unemployed to look for jobs. So in this economy, MassInno is a great place to go to seek out employment so a good percentage of people simply attend for that reason alone.

    Also after speaking with David Beisel, the Web Inno organizer, last night at the event, he mentioned that there was about 500 people (which is the number of chairs they put out) sitting in the auditorium and maybe 700 in attendance last night.

    Common event organizing is to account for people not showing up even though they signed up. The sign up number is generally higher for free events versus paid events.

    When analyzing events it’s necessary to compare things, events in this case, in the same category, or the data presented is not in proper context and can not logically back up any argument.

  • bschlenker

    Hi Chris! The eLearning Guild runs a conference called DevLearn for eLearning professionals. This year was the biggest response we've had to using twitter and so we created a tweetbook (255 pages) of all the tweets. It turned out GREAT! http://bit.ly/5QOYBM

    Its a nice way to reflect on the conference once it is over. One of your commenters mentioned not focusing on the event enough because he tweeted too much. But I would argue that tweeting can be like taking notes. And if you aggregate the tweets at the end then you have all of your notes + everyone else's notes.

  • jeffcutler

    Sorry. Didn't mean to imply any event was less successful than another. Thanks for the clarification.

    Also didn't know that NERD only held 400 until you shared that figure. Good to know for some of the events we've planned there in 2010.

    I was only sharing the RSVP number I got from Webinno organizers last night. They told me that 1200 had signed up and they were expecting about 960 or more.

    I would say David's estimate of 700 was pretty close.

    Great to hear from you…good points. You're right, events should be compared apples to apples.

    Jeff

  • http://twitter.com/klrichardson Kevin Richardson

    This is a good start to what needs to be a broad and deep conversation. Yes there are opportunities before, during and after the show in terms of social media. Lots of gains to be had in that regard. I also see a need for shows themselves to become more community based/community driven. More trust in the crowd to determine what topics, sessions, schedules are best. Let me (attendee) get involved in the event at a grassroots level and I'll bring not only my passion but all of my friends.

  • http://www.MarkMcCulloch.com Mark McCulloch Success Coach

    Hi Chris

    I just wanted to say what a great blog you have I am very pleased that I found your blog via Technorati.

    I have also very much enjoyed reading your Social Media article and learnt alot from it I must admit.

  • http://theredrecruiter.com theredrecruiter

    Nice and candid feedback Chris! With so many tools floating around, I think it becomes difficult to decide which ones to focus on… surely the winners will bubble to the top soon.

  • http://simonmainwaring.com/blog Simon Mainwaring

    Great post, Chris. Tools are exactly that and need to be considered and used individually in communicating your message. Too often brands just blanket social media with no sensitivity to the specific dynamics of each. Great post,

    Simon Mainwaring

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  • edmelby

    Does anybody including Chris have any comments on the incredibly successful but secret MIT group strategy that won the Dept of Defense challenge in only a few hours by using social networking to locate weather balloons secretly placed around the United States???

  • servantofchaos

    For the recent MarketingNow conference, I set up a Posterous site while sitting in the audience. Then rather than just tweeting ideas and key points, audience members were able to contextualise these points, add the video being discussed or link to pictures or articles. And the good thing is, that it continued to live way beyond the conference.
    Take a look at http://marketingnow.posterous.com

  • sue_anne

    I need to figure out the balance between live tweeting from events and being actively engaged. I feel like when I try to catch things to send via Twitter that I lose part of that engagement. In some sessions this might be okay, but in some others it's not. For those organizing conferences, there is a benefit for them to assign volunteers and others to “report” from sessions – whether its live tweeting or live blogging (via something like CoverItLive). I know that the tweets from #09NTC from NTEN has definitely generated interest for people to attend #10NTC. It was also a great way to learn about sessions you weren't able to attend.

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  • davelutz

    Chris looking forward to your presentation today at IAEE! There are quite a few new tools being launched this year that are event centric. Many of them are from very small companies that don't have a sustainable revenue model for the ghost town solutions you mention.

    The ones that I'm liking most will allow you to compare your existing connections from solutions like LinkedIn, Twitter or Facebook vs. the full registration database. When I'm able to see those that are in my social graph that are attending, or not attending, I can then reach out on a one to one basis. For me, this creates an opportunity to accelerate face-2-face networking and schedule time to hang out with and leverage my existing network.

    The primary value of face-2-face over virtual alternatives for me is the networking value. My business always gets a boost when I attend and kick networking into over-drive.

  • kruresearch

    Chris, how about traditional methods to drive attendees. Do you use old fashioned “smile and dial” phone folks? Has it worked? What about traditional print mail — brochures dead? What about postcards? Thanks much!
    - Kevin Kruse

  • bigmantis

    From the viewpoint of an attendee: I know that I'm finding out about more events on Twitter now than in any other way. I learned of a blogging conference in a neighboring state through Twitter. I even found my photographer through Twitter when someone else tweeted about a special event and offer she was running. Big event or small event, it really does work. From my point of view, not enough information is being tweeted. I'd like to be able to see a tweet on every speaker, parking, hotels, anything and everything I'd like to know. I'm not sure why. Every event has a website and it might be more efficient to just go to the website and get the info I need but, for reasons I can't even explain, I look for it on Twitter. Perhaps it's as simple as “that's where I am” and while I'm there, I'm curious.

  • http://twitter.com/mvhamilton Mike Hamilton

    Chris,

    I agree that the benefit of social media to drive event business objectives like awareness and attendance is still evolving. However, I think social media may have another more immediately impactful use within conference and event sessions. As a platform to fuel crowd sourcing, drive interaction and expand knowledge/insight sharing beyond the four walls of the meeting room, it holds significant potential.

  • http://www.collaborationking.com Collaboration King

    Great post. Would love to see the presentation.

    The problem that we see however is that adding social media to a 'sit and get' conference doesn't solve the problem with 95% of conferences.

    You are still stuck behind a conference table with a bowl of cheap candies and pitcher of water with a pen that you will no doubt steal.

    It would be great if you (Chris) could use your influence to ask “How events can use” what Social Media is meant to create– think: conferences with real interaction, real follow-up results, real information use and action.

    NO MORE “Death by PowerPoint”
    NO MORE “One conference on Twitter, one in my head, and one that 'that guy' is talking about right now 150ft away from me.

  • http://twitter.com/AxsDeny AxsDeny

    You should talk to the people at An Event Apart. If anyone knows great ways to tie in with social media, it's those guys.

  • dwaynetini

    Chris, I think attendees should Tweet and message before conference about hotel deals, airline deals, great places to eat and where not to go. Conferences are very expensive but attendees can help each other save money while attending.

    During the conference it would also be interesting to get Twitter messages on locations of side meetings not on conference agenda – a little conference meet-up, care of Twitter.

    And when the conference is all done, how about Twitter messages or Facebook post on who wants to share a ride to the airport to save a little money. Who knows, you might share a ride with someone very interesting.

  • http://www.vitabits.de/gesundheit-des-mannes shaunhenriques

    Its really creates an opportunity to accelerate face-2-face networking and schedule time to hang out with and leverage my existing network.Social media interaction are considered to be different when compare to other activists.People in your network may not be your target for an event, they may be an influencer.The positives are that shows extended by social media get talked about more, get more coverage, get more exposure, and have better potential to grow using non-traditional marketing methods.

    folsäure

  • thesocial1

    This information is very timely for me as I was wondering about the best way to promote an upcoming event. You shared so many possibilities. Thanks.

  • http://www.davidwalker.tv/ David Walker

    It's not easy for traditional companies to adapt to or even see the potential of Social Media but it is here to stay, and anyone who doesn't jump on the wagon is going to be left behind, very far behind.
    Look at what social media tools can do for events. I say the positives far outweigh any negatives.

  • patrickgarmoe

    Hi Chris,
    Love the blog and all you do. I was a bit surprised you weren't more pumped about the possibilities here. My company actually met with a client in the events business recently, and I really see social media as being an excellent set of tools for putting every conference on steroids. I agree that software that really incorporates social media tools isn't quite there yet, but I think convention holders are beginning to realize how much bigger their reach can be, if they simply remind people what the hashtag for the convention is, and stream particular sessions, etc. I couldn't attend any conventions this year, but I've gotten a lot out of the Marketing Profs convention in Chicago, and the SES convention, purely by both reading the tweets and taking advantage of watching panels and videos online. So while full integration might be years away, the free tools like Twitter and Ustream I think are already beginning to make a huge impact in bringing a larger community to any large event.

    One other note however: I agree with a prior commenter, who mentioned that it's tough to tweet and listen. As a journalist covering events, I was constantly frustrated that I had to take notes, because I knew while doing such, I was always missing great material. Now since many sessions are often available for replay online, that at least partly remedies the problem. So though I love that other people tweet conferences live, I'm not sure if I'll be doing the same.
    Thanks,
    Patrick Garmoe @PureDriven
    http://www.puredriven.com

  • http://www.onebyonemedia.com Jim "Genuine" Turner

    Still need to get you on Blog World Expo Radio Chris to talk about your message of inspiration this year at Blog World. I'll have some time available soon on the show!

  • http://www.charleslau.com Charles Lau

    Thanks for the article. Over here in Singapore, I have seen people using social media to extend their product awareness (especially food products).

    It has become dawn to Singapore companies that social media is something to do, yet it is something still experimental (just like what you have said). And it's usually the smaller companies who dare to step into social media because they simply have nothing to lose.

  • mattsnod

    Great post, Chris. I wish everyone who plans or suggests events would read this!

  • http://scottgould.me Scott Gould

    Exactly. This is what I do all the time. Never fails – it's human nature

  • http://scottgould.me Scott Gould

    How do you get on with this approach?

    I've found 'green' has completely cut any budget I used to allocate to print – just not needed anymore

  • http://scottgould.me Scott Gould

    Exactly. This is what I do all the time. Never fails – it's human nature