Sponsored Post- Online Shopping?- Pay Cash and Feel Secure with eBillMe

ebillme

This is a sponsored post. My pledge to you is that I’ll never take a sponsorship from someone I can’t endorse, or from someone that doesn’t match the interests of this community. I also disclose every affiliation on my About page.

Do you pay your bills online? Do you do online banking? Have you ever wondered about how secure online payments are? More interestingly, are you wondering about how to NOT use credit this holiday season and pay cash instead?

I think this might be interesting to you.

When I talked with Samer Forzley from eBillMe about his product, I admit that I didn’t understand it the first time I went to the website. That’s because it’s actually a lot more clever than I thought it was when I learned what they’re doing.

eBillme is like the middle man between your online purchases. You can use it at places like Buy.com or Tiger Direct or a bunch of other places (they’re signing up new ones as fast as they can, I’m told). The site has a really simple For Her and For Him section of gift ideas for Cyber Monday and Holiday shopping, by the way, which made for some interesting browsing for me. (I ended up on Buy.com because there was more to see.)

How It Works

(and if I’m wrong, Samer will help me fix this):

You buy something from Buy.com. For a payment method, you select “eBillMe.” When filling out the form to buy whatever, the merchant gets your email address, and so does eBillMe. Then, eBillMe sends you an email with a special code.

Take that code to your online bank of choice. You know where you pay bills, like the electric bill? Go there and put in that code and make eBillMe the payee. Then, just complete your purchase that way.

Then, eBillMe pays the merchant, and you get your stuff, without much fuss, and with lots more security.

Why This is Cool

Think about this: In this model, eBillMe gets funds from your bank, but from the BANK, not your direct account. In this model, eBillMe pays the merchant, which doesn’t pass any of your banking data through for the transaction. In this model, you see a deduction on your statement that says you paid “eBillMe” some money.

Compare that with paying with your debit card, where you give the merchant your bank info. At least two bad ideas in one there, right? Now compare it with paying through PayPal. Not bad, except that you have to give PayPal all your banking info. Right?

So eBillMe has this wrapped up in a fairly neat way, from the secure and anonymous point of view, eh?

Hoping The Idea Spreads

In 2009, with the credit crunch on, and with more people looking to protect their data online, I think an idea like eBillMe is pretty clever. I hope Samer and the team can get more people to accept it as a paying option (my guess is he’ll chime in for the comments and tell us what’s up there). But for now, I plan to use it for some holiday purchases, especially the For Her one, because one can always use help finding the right things to buy. (Okay, *I* can always use the help.)

What do you think?

The preceding was a sponsored post by eBillMe. My opinions are definitely my own, and this post was written by me with no external influence.

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  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    Two Ted Murphy’s? That’s illegal. : )

  • http://adamhcohen.com adamcohen

    Chris and Samer – While I do have some concerns about the ‘sponsoring’ aspect of the blog post, I’ll address the eCommerce side impact of the product. I work with retailers in the online channel, and have done several studies over the past couple of years about APMs (Alternate Payment Methods). I am in the process of refreshing our study to show of 100 of the top online retailers, which ones are using the “big three” in this space – Paypal, BillMeLater and Google Checkout. There has been substantial increase in adoption of these three in the last year but each has a case to tie to ROI for the retailer. I have a few questions for you:
    1) Where does eBillMe fit in in terms of adoption for major online retailing? Do retailers have to do work to allow eBillMe on their sites? Have many merchants started using it, and of those how many are having success they can directly tie to it?
    2) Do you have any data that shows an impact to key metrics retailers would look for when deciding whether to add eBillMe as an option? This could include an increase in conversion (number of visitors who make a purchase), a reduction in shopping cart abandonment, or increase in AOV (average order value), among others.

    I like the innovative concept (and the buyer protection program) and see some big potential as shoppers look for trustworthy, secure ways to make the online experience valuable – I’m wondering if online shopping sites are ready to make the option available.
    Thanks!
    Adam

  • http://adamhcohen.com Adam Cohen

    Chris and Samer – While I do have some concerns about the ‘sponsoring’ aspect of the blog post, I’ll address the eCommerce side impact of the product. I work with retailers in the online channel, and have done several studies over the past couple of years about APMs (Alternate Payment Methods). I am in the process of refreshing our study to show of 100 of the top online retailers, which ones are using the “big three” in this space – Paypal, BillMeLater and Google Checkout. There has been substantial increase in adoption of these three in the last year but each has a case to tie to ROI for the retailer. I have a few questions for you:
    1) Where does eBillMe fit in in terms of adoption for major online retailing? Do retailers have to do work to allow eBillMe on their sites? Have many merchants started using it, and of those how many are having success they can directly tie to it?
    2) Do you have any data that shows an impact to key metrics retailers would look for when deciding whether to add eBillMe as an option? This could include an increase in conversion (number of visitors who make a purchase), a reduction in shopping cart abandonment, or increase in AOV (average order value), among others.

    I like the innovative concept (and the buyer protection program) and see some big potential as shoppers look for trustworthy, secure ways to make the online experience valuable – I’m wondering if online shopping sites are ready to make the option available.
    Thanks!
    Adam

  • http://www.modernmediajapan.com Terrintokyo

    Hi Chris:

    I followed your tweet: I was glad to see the disclaimer, it did make me feel that you were aware of the pitfalls and potential bad reactions to a change like this.

    The elements of your blog that keep me coming back are:
    -useful ideas, links, concepts, people, in space I care a lot about.
    -realistic, near-future thinking.
    -the particular voice that you write with (in?), which helps me to build a picture of who you are, and trust you based on that.

    As long as those elements are still the blogs’s main fare, I have no problem at all with this kind of advertising.

  • http://www.modernmediajapan.com tokyoterri

    Hi Chris:

    I followed your tweet: I was glad to see the disclaimer, it did make me feel that you were aware of the pitfalls and potential bad reactions to a change like this.

    The elements of your blog that keep me coming back are:
    -useful ideas, links, concepts, people, in space I care a lot about.
    -realistic, near-future thinking.
    -the particular voice that you write with (in?), which helps me to build a picture of who you are, and trust you based on that.

    As long as those elements are still the blogs’s main fare, I have no problem at all with this kind of advertising.

  • http://jessicagottlieb.com Jessica Gottlieb

    I’ve been a little on the fence with this concept. As a past online retailer eBillMe makes a lot of sense, as a consumer I was skeptical.

    I’m giving it a go though, I’ve got a bunch of junk/necessities to buy today anyhow.

  • http://jessicagottlieb.com Jessica Gottlieb

    I’ve been a little on the fence with this concept. As a past online retailer eBillMe makes a lot of sense, as a consumer I was skeptical.

    I’m giving it a go though, I’ve got a bunch of junk/necessities to buy today anyhow.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Adam

    Would love to chat with you in detail, will DM you to follow up. Taking the conversation down a merchant point of view here but to answer your questions.

    Merchants are using it and with great results. We are available on many of the Internet Retailer top 500 list, including, tigerdirect.com, buy.com, shoebuy.com, crutchfield.com, etronics.com, etc…

    Yes there is an integration process, but we have done independent study by Glenbrook Partners and the study showed that out of the alternatives we are one of the easiest to implement especially since merchants don’t have to deal with issues like NSF, chargebacks, etc…

    We have case studies form merchants showing discussing higher AOV, etc… And happy to share those as well.

    The data from the surveys we have done with Jupiter and Javelin shows a clear shift away from credit instruments. People want to pay now, with cash, but also don’t want to give companies their bank numbers and permission to draw from them, and the Buyer Protection program we have in place help merchants with conversion because it removes the hesitation at the checkout.

    Samer

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Adam

    Would love to chat with you in detail, will DM you to follow up. Taking the conversation down a merchant point of view here but to answer your questions.

    Merchants are using it and with great results. We are available on many of the Internet Retailer top 500 list, including, tigerdirect.com, buy.com, shoebuy.com, crutchfield.com, etronics.com, etc…

    Yes there is an integration process, but we have done independent study by Glenbrook Partners and the study showed that out of the alternatives we are one of the easiest to implement especially since merchants don’t have to deal with issues like NSF, chargebacks, etc…

    We have case studies form merchants showing discussing higher AOV, etc… And happy to share those as well.

    The data from the surveys we have done with Jupiter and Javelin shows a clear shift away from credit instruments. People want to pay now, with cash, but also don’t want to give companies their bank numbers and permission to draw from them, and the Buyer Protection program we have in place help merchants with conversion because it removes the hesitation at the checkout.

    Samer

  • Anonymous

    Interesting idea, but it seems easier to just keep using my credit card as I have for the past 10 years or so with no problems. A credit card gives me more protection.

  • http://lockwoodletter.com/marketing Chris Lockwood

    Interesting idea, but it seems easier to just keep using my credit card as I have for the past 10 years or so with no problems. A credit card gives me more protection.

  • http://Twitter.com/Ed Ed

    @ChrisBrogan

    I totally appreciate, just how much you care about your
    readers. It is obvious. Thank You.

    You, just as the rest of us, need to make a living.
    You are at the far end of the spectrum for integrity
    in presenting anything with a financial interest.

    Just how much great content-/scratch that old description/-
    Just how much of your highly evolved understanding,
    of navigating today’s and tomorrow’s internet
    personally, for our boss, or as entrepreneurs,
    are you supposed to give away as a volunteer?

    Maybe folks don’t notice what’s happening to them?
    Subtly, the very thoughts you provoke,
    and answers you provide are KEEPING people in the game!
    Where else in our daily lives,
    do we experience a tier 1 professional providing
    the equivalent valuable service you do, without
    billing large numbers in retainer?
    We don’t.

    We have to improve this model.
    While I agree with Fred Wilson’s “Freemium” model,
    and Ed Dale saying;
    “Why NOT give and teach
    your market everything to get up and going.
    They’ll not only remember it,
    They’ll remember how good you are, and be back.”
    Hopefully they’ll share you with thoughtful
    comments to many friends.
    But we can’t just hope
    one of our sharees keeps our critical services in business.

    @Samer *What* your service does,
    is very much something I want. But I have questions.

    How It Works:

    “You buy something from Buy.com. For a payment method, you select “eBillMe.” When filling out the form to buy whatever, the merchant gets your email address, and so does eBillMe. Then, eBillMe sends you an email with a special code.

    Take that code to your online bank of choice. You know where you pay bills, like the electric bill? Go there and put in that code and make eBillMe the payee. Then, just complete your purchase that way.

    Then, eBillMe pays the merchant, and you get your stuff, without much fuss, and with lots more security.” -CB

    Is that process every transaction?
    Start the buy, wait for the emailed code,
    enter/pay from online banking/wait for fedex?

    Helpful feedback. You have to make it less cumbersome.
    I’ve been searching for a more anonymous (secure)
    payment system, YET even a click less than folks
    signing into Paypal.
    A lot of folks have told me they’d pay $5 to $(large),
    if it was quick and simple and secure, but admit the
    steps stop them. And a lot of these folks would
    repeat the process.
    Somewhat as often as you tip big at your favorite joint.

    Well, 1000 people X $5 or $50, daily, weekly,
    monthly. I don’t want to lose that anymore.
    But even Paypal has been a click too many.

    Also, add certified trust safety badges more visibly.

    Hope this rant added to it for all, or anybody.

  • http://Twitter.com/NextInstinct Ed

    @ChrisBrogan

    I totally appreciate, just how much you care about your
    readers. It is obvious. Thank You.

    You, just as the rest of us, need to make a living.
    You are at the far end of the spectrum for integrity
    in presenting anything with a financial interest.

    Just how much great content-/scratch that old description/-
    Just how much of your highly evolved understanding,
    of navigating today’s and tomorrow’s internet
    personally, for our boss, or as entrepreneurs,
    are you supposed to give away as a volunteer?

    Maybe folks don’t notice what’s happening to them?
    Subtly, the very thoughts you provoke,
    and answers you provide are KEEPING people in the game!
    Where else in our daily lives,
    do we experience a tier 1 professional providing
    the equivalent valuable service you do, without
    billing large numbers in retainer?
    We don’t.

    We have to improve this model.
    While I agree with Fred Wilson’s “Freemium” model,
    and Ed Dale saying;
    “Why NOT give and teach
    your market everything to get up and going.
    They’ll not only remember it,
    They’ll remember how good you are, and be back.”
    Hopefully they’ll share you with thoughtful
    comments to many friends.
    But we can’t just hope
    one of our sharees keeps our critical services in business.

    @Samer *What* your service does,
    is very much something I want. But I have questions.

    How It Works:

    “You buy something from Buy.com. For a payment method, you select “eBillMe.” When filling out the form to buy whatever, the merchant gets your email address, and so does eBillMe. Then, eBillMe sends you an email with a special code.

    Take that code to your online bank of choice. You know where you pay bills, like the electric bill? Go there and put in that code and make eBillMe the payee. Then, just complete your purchase that way.

    Then, eBillMe pays the merchant, and you get your stuff, without much fuss, and with lots more security.” -CB

    Is that process every transaction?
    Start the buy, wait for the emailed code,
    enter/pay from online banking/wait for fedex?

    Helpful feedback. You have to make it less cumbersome.
    I’ve been searching for a more anonymous (secure)
    payment system, YET even a click less than folks
    signing into Paypal.
    A lot of folks have told me they’d pay $5 to $(large),
    if it was quick and simple and secure, but admit the
    steps stop them. And a lot of these folks would
    repeat the process.
    Somewhat as often as you tip big at your favorite joint.

    Well, 1000 people X $5 or $50, daily, weekly,
    monthly. I don’t want to lose that anymore.
    But even Paypal has been a click too many.

    Also, add certified trust safety badges more visibly.

    Hope this rant added to it for all, or anybody.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Ed

    That process of the code and setup happens the first time only. From that point on, every time you shop at any of our merchants, you get a bill with the amount, you log into your bank and pay it.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Ed

    That process of the code and setup happens the first time only. From that point on, every time you shop at any of our merchants, you get a bill with the amount, you log into your bank and pay it.

  • @DanielCimera

    Sounds like a great idea, just wonder how hard it will be to take market share away from paypal.
    Sounds like a better system but unfortunatley better does not always win.

    Great to see more competition in this area seeing as we have a long way to go to improve the online payment systems.

    Very interesting way for them to promote themselves.
    Anyway I have been following Chris for a while now and have found him to be are a great contributor of useful information and have no problem with this post.

  • @DanielCimera

    Sounds like a great idea, just wonder how hard it will be to take market share away from paypal.
    Sounds like a better system but unfortunatley better does not always win.

    Great to see more competition in this area seeing as we have a long way to go to improve the online payment systems.

    Very interesting way for them to promote themselves.
    Anyway I have been following Chris for a while now and have found him to be are a great contributor of useful information and have no problem with this post.

  • http://allurblogs.blogspot.com AJ in Nashville

    @ChrisBrogan:

    I DO like the idea of not relinquishing your personal info, but I wonder if one thing would disrupt eBillMe from being an immediate hit: the Online banking sites themselves; personally for moi, my bank’s site isn’t all that intuitive, and consequently, I don’t do a whole heckuva lot of online billpaying there. However I DO buy a lot online and use PayPal whenever I can, simply because of its no-muss-no-fuss way of getting a transaction done.

    Hopefully banking online will standardize in much the same way that online purchasing has. Then I think this will be a wave we all could be riding in the future.

  • http://allurblogs.blogspot.com AJ in Nashville

    @ChrisBrogan:

    I DO like the idea of not relinquishing your personal info, but I wonder if one thing would disrupt eBillMe from being an immediate hit: the Online banking sites themselves; personally for moi, my bank’s site isn’t all that intuitive, and consequently, I don’t do a whole heckuva lot of online billpaying there. However I DO buy a lot online and use PayPal whenever I can, simply because of its no-muss-no-fuss way of getting a transaction done.

    Hopefully banking online will standardize in much the same way that online purchasing has. Then I think this will be a wave we all could be riding in the future.

  • http://Frugalous.com Merlene Paynter

    @Samar do you have any Canadian retailers using eBillMe yet? I checked with TigerDirect.ca (Canadian face of TigerDirect.com) and Buy.ca and neither offered eBillMe as an option.

    In Canada all of the major banks are set up for easy email money transfers so I’m a bit surprised this isn’t available with the Canadian retailers I’ve looked at so far.

  • http://Frugalous.com Merlene Paynter

    @Samar do you have any Canadian retailers using eBillMe yet? I checked with TigerDirect.ca (Canadian face of TigerDirect.com) and Buy.ca and neither offered eBillMe as an option.

    In Canada all of the major banks are set up for easy email money transfers so I’m a bit surprised this isn’t available with the Canadian retailers I’ve looked at so far.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Merlene

    Thanks for the Question, eBillme is currently only available on US merchant sites.

    Thanks
    @sforzley

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Merlene

    Thanks for the Question, eBillme is currently only available on US merchant sites.

    Thanks
    @sforzley

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Merlene it would be available on tigerdirect.com not .ca and buy.com not .ca

    @sforzley

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Merlene it would be available on tigerdirect.com not .ca and buy.com not .ca

    @sforzley

  • http://heatherartworks.blogspot.com Heather

    Just as another informational resource – Samer, you might want ebillme to contact your local Better Business Bureau to update any information as well – here’s the link to the current BBB report on ebillme.
    http://delaware.bbb.org/WWWRoot/Report.aspx?site=90&bbb=0251&firm=6001374

  • http://heatherartworks.blogspot.com Heather

    Just as another informational resource – Samer, you might want ebillme to contact your local Better Business Bureau to update any information as well – here’s the link to the current BBB report on ebillme.
    http://delaware.bbb.org/WWWRoot/Report.aspx?site=90&bbb=0251&firm=6001374

  • http://www.reallypractical.com Mark Nagurski

    @chris

    I’m still undecided on the sponsored post idea.

    Too much display advertising annoys and distracts. Advertorial doesn’t sit well with many.

    Taking some inspiration from the trade mags cluttering my desk I think a dedicated paid review section could be something of an imperfect solution.

    It would be separate from main blog but still highlighted via twitter et al so as to provide value for the advertiser.

    Just a thought …

  • http://www.reallypractical.com Mark Nagurski

    @chris

    I’m still undecided on the sponsored post idea.

    Too much display advertising annoys and distracts. Advertorial doesn’t sit well with many.

    Taking some inspiration from the trade mags cluttering my desk I think a dedicated paid review section could be something of an imperfect solution.

    It would be separate from main blog but still highlighted via twitter et al so as to provide value for the advertiser.

    Just a thought …

  • http://www.conveniencebits.com Paul L’Acosta

    Wow, this is a truly amazing post. Not because of the product, but because of the comments. Social networks are a fascinating place: focus on the product, focus on the ad, focus on the post… but hey! let’s go back to focus on the product, why not! Like you said Chris, it’s all about the conversation.

    (By the way, I’ll check the service out and come back with a review)

  • http://www.conveniencebits.com Paul L’Acosta

    Wow, this is a truly amazing post. Not because of the product, but because of the comments. Social networks are a fascinating place: focus on the product, focus on the ad, focus on the post… but hey! let’s go back to focus on the product, why not! Like you said Chris, it’s all about the conversation.

    (By the way, I’ll check the service out and come back with a review)

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    @Paul – right. Not as much about eBillMe, but plenty about the conversation around the conversation. Eh? : )

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    @Paul – right. Not as much about eBillMe, but plenty about the conversation around the conversation. Eh? : )

  • http://www.VendorCity.com JC Cameron

    It looks and feels cumbersome. For the most part, I trust that my credit card company is going to handle things correctly and I am comfortable managing my finances on a credit card. Given these conditions, why would I spend the extra effort of going through these steps when I can more easily manage it via my credit card?

    The reason we pick one or two players that we can trust (such as our credit cards and PayPal) is to avoid the cumbersome steps that would otherwise be required (as with eBillMe). I think for those that are truly concerned about these issues, this is a viable option though it is unlikely to be useful for the general web user / online buyer.

    @Chris – These type of articles are completely acceptable in my opinion. A short notice at the top and a link to more info on your policies is more than enough.

  • http://www.VendorCity.com JC Cameron

    It looks and feels cumbersome. For the most part, I trust that my credit card company is going to handle things correctly and I am comfortable managing my finances on a credit card. Given these conditions, why would I spend the extra effort of going through these steps when I can more easily manage it via my credit card?

    The reason we pick one or two players that we can trust (such as our credit cards and PayPal) is to avoid the cumbersome steps that would otherwise be required (as with eBillMe). I think for those that are truly concerned about these issues, this is a viable option though it is unlikely to be useful for the general web user / online buyer.

    @Chris – These type of articles are completely acceptable in my opinion. A short notice at the top and a link to more info on your policies is more than enough.

  • Jim A

    Regarding JC Cameron’s comment:

    “The reason we pick one or two players that we can trust (such as our credit cards and PayPal) is to avoid the cumbersome steps that would otherwise be required (as with eBillMe).”

    If I understand the point of eBillMe, trust for Paypal or your bank isn’t the issue; it’s a matter of trusting e-retailers’ ability to protect your card number (and PIN, for debit cards).

    Card numbers are at some risk of interception during transmission to retailers over the Internet (though they are likely encrypted with a highly degree of security). The numbers may be at greater risk of theft when stored on retailers’ servers — during payment approval, and afterward as needed to process returns and payment disputes, etc. Card issuers (MasterCard, VISA, Amex et al.) have security guidelines aimed at protecting stored card numbers, but crooks are constantly looking for — and finding — end runs around them.

    Theft of card numbers from point of sale systems has been rampant in the last couple of years. Google “credit card” and TJX (ticker symbol for TJ Maxx) or Hannaford Bros.– the latter of which, at least, was in full compliance with card issuer security guidelines when scads of card numbers were hijacked.

    I haven’t used eBillMe and am not endorsing the service, but in theory, using eBillMe to avoid placing your card number in e-retailers’ computers is a way of reducing risk of fraud and identity theft.

  • Jim A

    Regarding JC Cameron’s comment:

    “The reason we pick one or two players that we can trust (such as our credit cards and PayPal) is to avoid the cumbersome steps that would otherwise be required (as with eBillMe).”

    If I understand the point of eBillMe, trust for Paypal or your bank isn’t the issue; it’s a matter of trusting e-retailers’ ability to protect your card number (and PIN, for debit cards).

    Card numbers are at some risk of interception during transmission to retailers over the Internet (though they are likely encrypted with a highly degree of security). The numbers may be at greater risk of theft when stored on retailers’ servers — during payment approval, and afterward as needed to process returns and payment disputes, etc. Card issuers (MasterCard, VISA, Amex et al.) have security guidelines aimed at protecting stored card numbers, but crooks are constantly looking for — and finding — end runs around them.

    Theft of card numbers from point of sale systems has been rampant in the last couple of years. Google “credit card” and TJX (ticker symbol for TJ Maxx) or Hannaford Bros.– the latter of which, at least, was in full compliance with card issuer security guidelines when scads of card numbers were hijacked.

    I haven’t used eBillMe and am not endorsing the service, but in theory, using eBillMe to avoid placing your card number in e-retailers’ computers is a way of reducing risk of fraud and identity theft.

  • http://www.randomactsofleadership.com Susan Mazza

    @ChrisBrogan This is just another example of why I have come to trust your recommendations and advice in such a short time. Transparency builds trust and trust builds relationship. From what I know of you so far you wouldn’t recommend something you wouldn’t buy or haven’t bought for yourself. I think you should be paid to connect potential buyers with sellers products because it serves us both. The slippery slope I think people fear is that the exchange of money will ultimately destroy the integrity of the recommendation process. The question I am left in though is not whether this kind of post is appropriate, but rather “how do WE as a community ensure the integrity of the “free” world “word of mouth” is maintained as people pursue new ways to make money in this space?”. Somehow I think this community will find a way to rat out the rats. But how can we be sure?

  • http://www.randomactsofleadership.com Susan Mazza

    @ChrisBrogan This is just another example of why I have come to trust your recommendations and advice in such a short time. Transparency builds trust and trust builds relationship. From what I know of you so far you wouldn’t recommend something you wouldn’t buy or haven’t bought for yourself. I think you should be paid to connect potential buyers with sellers products because it serves us both. The slippery slope I think people fear is that the exchange of money will ultimately destroy the integrity of the recommendation process. The question I am left in though is not whether this kind of post is appropriate, but rather “how do WE as a community ensure the integrity of the “free” world “word of mouth” is maintained as people pursue new ways to make money in this space?”. Somehow I think this community will find a way to rat out the rats. But how can we be sure?

  • http://www.fromoutoftheblue.com Peter

    I’ve been thinking that an alternative to paypal would come along. This, eBillMe, is interesting. I looked at their web site, but I didn’t quite get if it could be used by an individual like paypal can be for goods or services.

    I wanted to prefer googlecheckout as an alternative to paypal, but the google buttons always produced a huge amount of whitespace on the web page. Not finding a reference to this in their faq, I finally sent the question in to google and got, in response, a long list of links which seemed unrelated to the question. So, I no longer use googlecheckout.

    An alternative to paypal would be welcome, but I’d like to see a little more info for the as yet unsigned, and smaller, merchant.

  • http://www.fromoutoftheblue.com Peter

    I’ve been thinking that an alternative to paypal would come along. This, eBillMe, is interesting. I looked at their web site, but I didn’t quite get if it could be used by an individual like paypal can be for goods or services.

    I wanted to prefer googlecheckout as an alternative to paypal, but the google buttons always produced a huge amount of whitespace on the web page. Not finding a reference to this in their faq, I finally sent the question in to google and got, in response, a long list of links which seemed unrelated to the question. So, I no longer use googlecheckout.

    An alternative to paypal would be welcome, but I’d like to see a little more info for the as yet unsigned, and smaller, merchant.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    Peter

    If i understand your Question, eBillme is not P2P, it can be used to facilitate a transaction between a consumer and an online retailer, not Consumer to Consumer.

    @sforzley

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    Peter

    If i understand your Question, eBillme is not P2P, it can be used to facilitate a transaction between a consumer and an online retailer, not Consumer to Consumer.

    @sforzley

  • http://www.shefaly-yogendra.com/blog Shefaly

    @Chris and Samer

    I wonder what % of online buyers are so paranoid and have so much time on their hands as to add these extra transactions to their lives.

    This is a genuine question, not just a musing so will appreciate some data. Thanks.

    @Peter

    Small merchants can implement e-payment facilities using Worldpay or Bibit amongst others. Then people can use their credit cards as normal; the info does not get sent to the merchant and is only used to authenticate the customer and confirm the transaction.

  • http://www.shefaly-yogendra.com/blog Shefaly

    @Chris and Samer

    I wonder what % of online buyers are so paranoid and have so much time on their hands as to add these extra transactions to their lives.

    This is a genuine question, not just a musing so will appreciate some data. Thanks.

    @Peter

    Small merchants can implement e-payment facilities using Worldpay or Bibit amongst others. Then people can use their credit cards as normal; the info does not get sent to the merchant and is only used to authenticate the customer and confirm the transaction.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Shefaly

    On average a merchant converts at around 2%, that means for each 100 People on the site, Only 2 buy. What happened to the other 98? Cart abandonment at the checkout page is about 50%. Those who are surveyed continue to say security is top concern. Data from Javelin, Jupiter, Forrester, etc… is consistent 80% of those surveyed say security is the key issue at the checkout.

    eBillme is not just about security but about a combination of things,
    1) yes security
    2) We believe our buyer protection program helps consumers who hesitate at the checkout be it for price, satisfaction worries, fraud or other.
    3) eBillme helps people stay in control over their fiances, you authorize the transaction, you push it down the pipe, you don’t give anyone your finacial information and authorize them to access your bank account
    4) eBillme is convenient. With your CC you have to have your card with you to start with, then every time you transact you have to enter all your card numbers, name, expire date, CVV on the back, then depending on the merchant your Verified By Visa. Then when you are all done, you have to go to your bank account and pay your CC bill. With eBillme you just pay the bill. Its cardless you can shop without your wallet, all you need is an email address, and the eBill is mailed there, you then login and pay.

  • http://www.ebillme.com Samer Forzley

    @Shefaly

    On average a merchant converts at around 2%, that means for each 100 People on the site, Only 2 buy. What happened to the other 98? Cart abandonment at the checkout page is about 50%. Those who are surveyed continue to say security is top concern. Data from Javelin, Jupiter, Forrester, etc… is consistent 80% of those surveyed say security is the key issue at the checkout.

    eBillme is not just about security but about a combination of things,
    1) yes security
    2) We believe our buyer protection program helps consumers who hesitate at the checkout be it for price, satisfaction worries, fraud or other.
    3) eBillme helps people stay in control over their fiances, you authorize the transaction, you push it down the pipe, you don’t give anyone your finacial information and authorize them to access your bank account
    4) eBillme is convenient. With your CC you have to have your card with you to start with, then every time you transact you have to enter all your card numbers, name, expire date, CVV on the back, then depending on the merchant your Verified By Visa. Then when you are all done, you have to go to your bank account and pay your CC bill. With eBillme you just pay the bill. Its cardless you can shop without your wallet, all you need is an email address, and the eBill is mailed there, you then login and pay.

  • http://www.fromoutoftheblue.com Peter

    @sforzley I did not mean P2P, though paypal is flexible enough for that, but rarely used in my experience – unless it would be someone buying a service or purchasing something, say from craigslist, instead of from an online retailer. These are probably considered P2P. But, on my site there are a few items with “buy now” buttons from paypal, not even a full-fledged ecommerce program. Would eBillme work for that?

    @peters_web

  • http://www.fromoutoftheblue.com Peter

    @sforzley I did not mean P2P, though paypal is flexible enough for that, but rarely used in my experience – unless it would be someone buying a service or purchasing something, say from craigslist, instead of from an online retailer. These are probably considered P2P. But, on my site there are a few items with “buy now” buttons from paypal, not even a full-fledged ecommerce program. Would eBillme work for that?

    @peters_web

  • http://looking4ancestors.blogspot.com looking4ancestors

    How many times have you had the money in your bank account to make a purchase, but the site only takes credit cards? Finally a way to make on-line purchases without using a credit card, and not having to pay interest to the credit card company for that purchase. Thanks Chris for posting this.