The Righteous Web

preacher man It’s “social media means this and not that” time again. The comments from Marshall Kirkpatrick’s piece speaking out about Forrester Research’s report about sponsored posts are interesting. People are back to applying sweeping generalizations and/or responding to the post and not the details. Ah, it feels like December all over again.

First, as a quick primer, read: You’re Doing It Wrong!

There. Back?

What the social web gives us are tools. How we choose to use these tools is up to us. Are people trustworthy? Does a blog decide that? Are people sell-outs? Does a blog suggest they are not?

We demonstrate by our actions and by whatever trails we’ve left across the web whether we should be considered trustworthy. We attempt to discern trust and belief in people by how they appear and act in context. We do our homework (some of us). We look beyond the immediate. We observe.

Bloggers aren’t journalists. Bloggers are people who use blogging software. There are journalists who blog. There are bloggers who aspire to journalistic standards.

Shoemoney and John Chow and the entire “make money online” tribe aren’t evil. They’re using the tools the way they want to use them. They’re up front about it. In fact, they’re a lot more straightforward about their intentions than lots of people I come across in a given day. At least I know where they’re coming from.

The business side of blogging and social media isn’t evil or bad or wrong. It’s just a different take.

This whole thing is a spectrum. There’s Scarborough Dude, who is the furthest thing from commercial that you could ever experience. There’s Dave Winer, who writes from passion and his gut. Hell, Marshall, author of the post I’m talking about, is a really thoughtful and passionate guy.

Only, that big fat stripe of ads along the sidebar and the sponsored posts on the site make me get a little bit of “pot/kettle” feeling.

I will always be clear about where I’m coming from. I’ve worked long and hard to build this blog and the reputation that precedes me. You’re welcome to cry righteous all you want, and I’ll respect your opinion. But I’m over here doing what I’ve been doing all along, and I’ll make sure you always see where I’m coming from and how everything relates to me.

Fair?

Awesome photo credit, altemark

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  • http://hightalk.wordpress.com/ George Snell

    Hi Chris:
    As a former journalist, I like it when journalists try to apply the same standards from newspapers and magazines to social media platforms like blogging – but fail to realize that the journalistic standards they embrace never really existed in the first place.

    Newspapers have always been biased. I’ll agree that newspapers – and I’ve worked at a few – try to keep advertising away from news gathering. They truly do, but it never works out as planned. Advertisers at newspapers and magazines – especially big advertisers – have always been treated better than non-advertisers. They receive special treatment and even get better coverage. Reporters will deny it, but its true.

    All you need to do is look at the big media/news companies and watch how their news outlets promote their entertainment projects. Cover stories about blockbuster movies, interviews with contestants from their reality shows on their morning news shows, etc.

    The solution is transparency. If you are writing about a client (or an advertiser) then be upfront about it. Reveal it. It will be up to readers to determine if they want to believe the content. Just because content is produced by a private company doesn’t necessarily mean its not a valuable.

    But good debate. This is the kind of conversation we need to be having more of. And while I agree that your post was a bit defensive, Chris, I think it was necessary to post it.

  • http://www.voteaudrey.com VoteAudrey

    And even movies feature plugs for beverage brands, et cetera. Audience knows the difference between an evangelist, advocate and endorser.

  • http://www.voteaudrey.com VoteAudrey

    And even movies feature plugs for beverage brands, et cetera. Audience knows the difference between an evangelist, advocate and endorser.

  • http://socialmediarockstar.com Brett Borders

    You also have to consider the damage that adding sponsored links your website’s trust and ranking reputation in Google and other search engines. If you don’t clearly disclose the sponsorship in a machine-readable format and/or “nofollow” the links – your blog can run into trouble.

  • http://socialmediarockstar.com Brett Borders

    You also have to consider the damage that adding sponsored links your website’s trust and ranking reputation in Google and other search engines. If you don’t clearly disclose the sponsorship in a machine-readable format and/or “nofollow” the links – your blog can run into trouble.

  • http://twitter.com/cflinnds Cheryl

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.
    The tool is not defined by the utilizers. Cannot be defined. Is there an exclusively* (*key word here) “right way” to use a Windsor-Newton series 7 watercolor brush?
    It’s the end product. The output.
    This is not to say that if you’re annoying or off-putting your art gallery show (or Twitter posts) won’t be ignored; they may well be.
    But the choice in how you use those tools is up to you.

    Thanks for the always-relevant posts, Chris.

  • http://twitter.com/cflinnds Cheryl

    Thank you, thank you, thank you.
    The tool is not defined by the utilizers. Cannot be defined. Is there an exclusively* (*key word here) “right way” to use a Windsor-Newton series 7 watercolor brush?
    It’s the end product. The output.
    This is not to say that if you’re annoying or off-putting your art gallery show (or Twitter posts) won’t be ignored; they may well be.
    But the choice in how you use those tools is up to you.

    Thanks for the always-relevant posts, Chris.

  • http://digitalstrategy.typepad.com Rich Nadworny

    Chris,

    Good for you. The key issue here is transparency and authenticity. In this sense, having someone blog for you, or giving Guy Kawasaki a car isn’t the issue, it’s whether we as consumers know where you’re coming from. Most old media doesn’t work that way.

    As for good and evil, Seth Godin had a great blog entry on “Is Marketing Evil?” a few weeks back. http://cli.gs/76G9X2

    Marketing or blogging is value neutral. What you do with it is another question.

  • http://digitalstrategy.typepad.com Rich Nadworny

    Chris,

    Good for you. The key issue here is transparency and authenticity. In this sense, having someone blog for you, or giving Guy Kawasaki a car isn’t the issue, it’s whether we as consumers know where you’re coming from. Most old media doesn’t work that way.

    As for good and evil, Seth Godin had a great blog entry on “Is Marketing Evil?” a few weeks back. http://cli.gs/76G9X2

    Marketing or blogging is value neutral. What you do with it is another question.

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com adamkmiec

    If Popular Photo Magazine were given FREE Nikon D3X’s from Nikon to review and Nikon paid the editors to write about the product and Popular Photo disclosed that information, I STILL wouldn’t believe a positive review from Popular Photo. I would look for other sources and other reviews, because my fear is that the information from Popular Photo would be biased.

    You can argue credibility. You can say well the author has always been credible so why wouldn’t they be credible now? But, here’s the fact…if you sell yourself continually you lose credibility ridiculously quick.

    Here’s a scenario. I’m a loyal Nikon advocate. I have been for nearly 20 years. Let’s say Canon came to me, offered me X dollars, and a free X camera to do a review on the product and I accepted. If the review I gave was positive would the readers believe me? Of course not.

    You can’t buy credibility, but you can lose it when you sell yourself.

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com Adam Kmiec

    If Popular Photo Magazine were given FREE Nikon D3X’s from Nikon to review and Nikon paid the editors to write about the product and Popular Photo disclosed that information, I STILL wouldn’t believe a positive review from Popular Photo. I would look for other sources and other reviews, because my fear is that the information from Popular Photo would be biased.

    You can argue credibility. You can say well the author has always been credible so why wouldn’t they be credible now? But, here’s the fact…if you sell yourself continually you lose credibility ridiculously quick.

    Here’s a scenario. I’m a loyal Nikon advocate. I have been for nearly 20 years. Let’s say Canon came to me, offered me X dollars, and a free X camera to do a review on the product and I accepted. If the review I gave was positive would the readers believe me? Of course not.

    You can’t buy credibility, but you can lose it when you sell yourself.

  • http://www.quired.com J. Paul Duplantis

    Everybody needs products and services. Is it not the engine that drives employment, development of resources and innovation.

    It seems like social media has painted itself into a corner. Bloggers have built such hype around community and sharing of which drives traffic to their sites they now have to explain themselves time and time again when they want to make money.

    Newsflash. We all want to make money. I am following this thread and I see apologists.

    Find a product, service, event or idea that you believe in and write about it. If you have built your following as a blogger around the notion of the Utopian dream that everything in life that is good is free then I guess you reap what you sow.

    Chris seems to get this but I have also seen countless posts and comments where he is having to explain himself to his community.

    Our society has evolved from post World War II to a culture of ideas and talk and slowly away from building and selling tangibles.

    Quite talking and postulating people. Make it, sell it, provide great customer service and scream from the mountaintop that you love what you make.

    And hell yes if you can find a talented blogger to write about it – you bet.

    Quit apologizing people.

  • http://www.quired.com J. Paul Duplantis

    Everybody needs products and services. Is it not the engine that drives employment, development of resources and innovation.

    It seems like social media has painted itself into a corner. Bloggers have built such hype around community and sharing of which drives traffic to their sites they now have to explain themselves time and time again when they want to make money.

    Newsflash. We all want to make money. I am following this thread and I see apologists.

    Find a product, service, event or idea that you believe in and write about it. If you have built your following as a blogger around the notion of the Utopian dream that everything in life that is good is free then I guess you reap what you sow.

    Chris seems to get this but I have also seen countless posts and comments where he is having to explain himself to his community.

    Our society has evolved from post World War II to a culture of ideas and talk and slowly away from building and selling tangibles.

    Quite talking and postulating people. Make it, sell it, provide great customer service and scream from the mountaintop that you love what you make.

    And hell yes if you can find a talented blogger to write about it – you bet.

    Quit apologizing people.

  • http://www.dallasseoblog.com steveplunkett

    I started blogging links sept.1st, 1996… http://www.coolwebsites.org/septcool.html if someone said “i will give you $1000 to link to my website” and it fit with what i was doing, i guess i might link to it.. however NO ONE has ever said that… i get spam emails from people wanting to trade links, i’ve had some emails come in “we want to buy a link… (this is where i hit delete or forward to google)” simple thing is… if it doesn’t fit the content and doesn’t provide unique relevant value, DON’t link it…

    my blog is nothing but links..
    http://www.dallasseoblog.com (not ONE paid link so DON’T ASK i will forward you to abuse@google.com, spamreport@google.com and webmaster@google.com),. (did i mention i HATE link traders/spammers?)

    i write for other blogs..
    http://www.searchenginejournal.com/seo-a-process-not-a-project/8721/

    i blog what i read on my own blog.. i’m like your own personal feed reader…
    i have NEVER used nofollow ANYWHERE except on a webpage for a hospital system i helped build in 1996 where we didn’t want google indexing the pages linked from that page. so that was in the robots tag anyways not “rel=nofollow”.

    I think if you are going to post a paid link you should notate that it is a paid link.. and since it’s against google guidelines to do paid lniks, then you should either use a nofollow AS REQUESTED, or.. buy outdoor, radio or other advertising because hopefully google will remove you from their index.

    i’m sick of spam. i’m sick of people that don’t follow the rules, i have for 14 years, it’s never been hard… simple fact.. if you are getting/doing a paid link for SEO and it’s not Yahoo! directory, then you should face the consequences..

  • http://www.dallasseoblog.com steveplunkett

    I started blogging links sept.1st, 1996… http://www.coolwebsites.org/septcool.html if someone said “i will give you $1000 to link to my website” and it fit with what i was doing, i guess i might link to it.. however NO ONE has ever said that… i get spam emails from people wanting to trade links, i’ve had some emails come in “we want to buy a link… (this is where i hit delete or forward to google)” simple thing is… if it doesn’t fit the content and doesn’t provide unique relevant value, DON’t link it…

    my blog is nothing but links..
    http://www.dallasseoblog.com (not ONE paid link so DON’T ASK i will forward you to abuse@google.com, spamreport@google.com and webmaster@google.com),. (did i mention i HATE link traders/spammers?)

    i write for other blogs..
    http://www.searchenginejournal.com/seo-a-process-not-a-project/8721/

    i blog what i read on my own blog.. i’m like your own personal feed reader…
    i have NEVER used nofollow ANYWHERE except on a webpage for a hospital system i helped build in 1996 where we didn’t want google indexing the pages linked from that page. so that was in the robots tag anyways not “rel=nofollow”.

    I think if you are going to post a paid link you should notate that it is a paid link.. and since it’s against google guidelines to do paid lniks, then you should either use a nofollow AS REQUESTED, or.. buy outdoor, radio or other advertising because hopefully google will remove you from their index.

    i’m sick of spam. i’m sick of people that don’t follow the rules, i have for 14 years, it’s never been hard… simple fact.. if you are getting/doing a paid link for SEO and it’s not Yahoo! directory, then you should face the consequences..

  • http://www.ioncorporation.com/blog mark ivey

    Several people comment they don’t know what the fuss is about. The reason it’s an issue is we keep confusing bloggers with journalists. As you point out, bloggers aren’t journalists. They may be entertaining, educational, inspirational (like you, Chris) and they may “aspire to journalism standards” but they’re not trained journalists. So as long as everything is transparent, and it passes the credibility test, there’s nothing wrong with, say, sponsorships to help support a blogger. Bloggers earn their readers trust over time, and as long as they stay consistent with their standards, readers will give them the benefit of the doubt. Journalists have the benefit of systems, rules etc (At BW, we couldn’t accept anything more than a $25 gift or what we could lug home, so a cheap bottle of wine may be ok but a paid cruise was not). Bloggers have to work to build trust in every post, every day. As always, it comes down to trust.

  • http://www.ioncorporation.com/blog mark ivey

    Several people comment they don’t know what the fuss is about. The reason it’s an issue is we keep confusing bloggers with journalists. As you point out, bloggers aren’t journalists. They may be entertaining, educational, inspirational (like you, Chris) and they may “aspire to journalism standards” but they’re not trained journalists. So as long as everything is transparent, and it passes the credibility test, there’s nothing wrong with, say, sponsorships to help support a blogger. Bloggers earn their readers trust over time, and as long as they stay consistent with their standards, readers will give them the benefit of the doubt. Journalists have the benefit of systems, rules etc (At BW, we couldn’t accept anything more than a $25 gift or what we could lug home, so a cheap bottle of wine may be ok but a paid cruise was not). Bloggers have to work to build trust in every post, every day. As always, it comes down to trust.

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com adamkmiec

    @mark ivey -

    interesting point about bloggers vs. journalists. there’s simply less journalistic integrity these days. the concept of reporting doesn’t seem to exist – it’s more about opinions and conjectures…which are often what bloggers do. it doesn’t help that Google news lumps blogs and “traditional journalists” together http://news.google.com/

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com Adam Kmiec

    @mark ivey -

    interesting point about bloggers vs. journalists. there’s simply less journalistic integrity these days. the concept of reporting doesn’t seem to exist – it’s more about opinions and conjectures…which are often what bloggers do. it doesn’t help that Google news lumps blogs and “traditional journalists” together http://news.google.com/

  • http://westdeptford.lib.nj.us CarolynWood

    Bloggers tell stories of human experience whether content is personal, professional, soulful or snarky. They chronicle the human condition at a precise moment in time.

    Questions – Will their insights be archived for the ages, to be studied by anthropologists in the future? If not, is the value of blog participation reduced?

    Blogging and other forms of social media expand communication. The social media feature of posting of comments provides opportunities to encode and decode information in a common space – and isn’t that what communication is all about regardless of how you do it?

  • http://westdeptford.lib.nj.us CarolynWood

    Bloggers tell stories of human experience whether content is personal, professional, soulful or snarky. They chronicle the human condition at a precise moment in time.

    Questions – Will their insights be archived for the ages, to be studied by anthropologists in the future? If not, is the value of blog participation reduced?

    Blogging and other forms of social media expand communication. The social media feature of posting of comments provides opportunities to encode and decode information in a common space – and isn’t that what communication is all about regardless of how you do it?

  • http://www.ioncorporation.com/blog mark ivey

    “There’s simply less journalistic integrity”
    I don’t agree with that, at least when it comes to the traditional news media–WSJ, BW, NYT. They’ve had lapses, of course, but it’s overstating it to say it’s a total breakdown of journalistic integrity.. They’re “reporting” as much today as 20 yrs ago, and as far as I know, with the same stringent standards and checks and balances (though on a faster time schedule).
    Of course, they’re moving to more opinions, editorials, twittering, blogging, etc–but they’ve been doing that for many years. Hopefully the journalism standards will prevail as they move to new mediums like Twitter. If they don’t, then you’ll be proven right. But I think they will–their pubs brands depend on it.

    What we have had is an invasion of the pseudo-journalists–the CNBC talking heads for instance…all opinion, gun slinging “journalism”. Then the rise of the blogger news sites like Huffington Post, Tech Crunch. Their standards and systems will vary but some are extremely opinionated, giving observers an overall sense that there’s a breakdown in journalism standards. I know some bloggers will challenge these opinions, but I’m not taking up for the established media, which is now in serious trouble. All I’m saying is we need to avoid broadbrushing everyone with the same label.

  • http://www.ioncorporation.com/blog mark ivey

    “There’s simply less journalistic integrity”
    I don’t agree with that, at least when it comes to the traditional news media–WSJ, BW, NYT. They’ve had lapses, of course, but it’s overstating it to say it’s a total breakdown of journalistic integrity.. They’re “reporting” as much today as 20 yrs ago, and as far as I know, with the same stringent standards and checks and balances (though on a faster time schedule).
    Of course, they’re moving to more opinions, editorials, twittering, blogging, etc–but they’ve been doing that for many years. Hopefully the journalism standards will prevail as they move to new mediums like Twitter. If they don’t, then you’ll be proven right. But I think they will–their pubs brands depend on it.

    What we have had is an invasion of the pseudo-journalists–the CNBC talking heads for instance…all opinion, gun slinging “journalism”. Then the rise of the blogger news sites like Huffington Post, Tech Crunch. Their standards and systems will vary but some are extremely opinionated, giving observers an overall sense that there’s a breakdown in journalism standards. I know some bloggers will challenge these opinions, but I’m not taking up for the established media, which is now in serious trouble. All I’m saying is we need to avoid broadbrushing everyone with the same label.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    I have the most thoughtful, intelligent, motivated group of people here in the comments than any blog in the world. I’m grateful for your attention and your ideas. These conversations shape my thoughts and opinions, and hearing your perspective helps me grow.

    Thank you.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    I have the most thoughtful, intelligent, motivated group of people here in the comments than any blog in the world. I’m grateful for your attention and your ideas. These conversations shape my thoughts and opinions, and hearing your perspective helps me grow.

    Thank you.

  • http://johnhaydon.com John Haydon

    Most of the time when people angrily criticize another, they’re usually just mad or jealous. 10% of the time it’s righteous, but 90% of the time it’s just a temper tantrum.

  • http://corporatedollar.org John Haydon

    Most of the time when people angrily criticize another, they’re usually just mad or jealous. 10% of the time it’s righteous, but 90% of the time it’s just a temper tantrum.

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com adamkmiec

    @mark ivey-

    after watching the election coverage, I’m convinced that the concept of journalistic integrity, lack of bias, and reporting based on facts is long gone.

  • http://www.thekmiecs.com Adam Kmiec

    @mark ivey-

    after watching the election coverage, I’m convinced that the concept of journalistic integrity, lack of bias, and reporting based on facts is long gone.

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  • http://thefuturebuzz.com Adam Singer

    The ONLY problem the way I see it is packaging things like IZEA does for paid blog posts kind of cheapens what is possible through organic PR. It doesn’t just hurt the PR industry, it hurts companies when they want to engage in unique promotions that generate buzz without handing over cold hard cash to bloggers. Just sayin.

  • http://thefuturebuzz.com Adam Singer

    The ONLY problem the way I see it is packaging things like IZEA does for paid blog posts kind of cheapens what is possible through organic PR. It doesn’t just hurt the PR industry, it hurts companies when they want to engage in unique promotions that generate buzz without handing over cold hard cash to bloggers. Just sayin.

  • http://donotreadthisblogunless.blogspot.com/ Nicholas Chase

    Chris,

    Enjoying the thread that the post’s have elicited. This conversation has started some very well crafted responses, and is precisely the basis purpose of our ‘computer-based dialog’. Marshall made some salient points for his side of the equation, and your responses were well tempered and respectful.

    The freedom to use this electronic medium for any purpose either than illegal is a treasured one for me. The many gifted journalist’s who would have no voice at all in the background noise of the publishing business can express their thoughts freely and unreservedly in the blog-o-sphere.

    Our country (USA) was founded in the spirit of the freedoms we all share today, and it is always good to elicit responses from a cross section of thought-leaders and others affected by modern decision making processes.

    The marketplace will excise any who violate the precepts that make this all possible, ie ‘Free Enterprise’.

    I value the things you believe in, write about and then open the comments to all for discussion. That precept is reflected in the general responses I read in the comments.

    I have seven blogs, all monetized, but my readers do not click on the ads! They read and respond to the story or information I share. This is the basis for Social Media, and is the reason I started blogging last year. not to make money, I do that elsewhere on the web 2.0 highway.

    My reasons for blogging are to share what little I know, and learn from those who do.

    Respectfully,

    Nicholas Chase
    http://www.twitter.com/nachase

  • http://donotreadthisblogunless.blogspot.com/ Nicholas Chase

    Chris,

    Enjoying the thread that the post’s have elicited. This conversation has started some very well crafted responses, and is precisely the basis purpose of our ‘computer-based dialog’. Marshall made some salient points for his side of the equation, and your responses were well tempered and respectful.

    The freedom to use this electronic medium for any purpose either than illegal is a treasured one for me. The many gifted journalist’s who would have no voice at all in the background noise of the publishing business can express their thoughts freely and unreservedly in the blog-o-sphere.

    Our country (USA) was founded in the spirit of the freedoms we all share today, and it is always good to elicit responses from a cross section of thought-leaders and others affected by modern decision making processes.

    The marketplace will excise any who violate the precepts that make this all possible, ie ‘Free Enterprise’.

    I value the things you believe in, write about and then open the comments to all for discussion. That precept is reflected in the general responses I read in the comments.

    I have seven blogs, all monetized, but my readers do not click on the ads! They read and respond to the story or information I share. This is the basis for Social Media, and is the reason I started blogging last year. not to make money, I do that elsewhere on the web 2.0 highway.

    My reasons for blogging are to share what little I know, and learn from those who do.

    Respectfully,

    Nicholas Chase
    http://www.twitter.com/nachase

  • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

    It’s the age old question in a new set of clothes – what came first, the sponsored chicken or the righteous egg?

    If people want to make money advertising on their blog, where’s the harm? If people want to make money writing reviews on their blog, where’s the harm? If people want to take paid backlinks in their sidebars, where’s the harm?

    At the end of the day, the blogger in question will be the one who knows whether they’re being true to themselves and their readers, or not.

    Is it any different from raving over a product or service normally? Say you love Canon. They say, “We’d love you to review our products for us and you can keep the goods.” You’re already a fan and you’d probably write about them anyway, so why shouldn’t you be compensated (if you wish).

    I love this field we play in but I’m beginning to get jaded with all the “You must do this, you mustn’t do that” posts and missives flying about.

    I know who I am. I know what my ethics are. I know what my transparency is. Can you really tell me what I should or shouldn’t do?

    Thanks Chris, as usual, for keeping it in the hands of the people who know each other best – ourselves.

  • http://dannybrown.me Danny Brown

    It’s the age old question in a new set of clothes – what came first, the sponsored chicken or the righteous egg?

    If people want to make money advertising on their blog, where’s the harm? If people want to make money writing reviews on their blog, where’s the harm? If people want to take paid backlinks in their sidebars, where’s the harm?

    At the end of the day, the blogger in question will be the one who knows whether they’re being true to themselves and their readers, or not.

    Is it any different from raving over a product or service normally? Say you love Canon. They say, “We’d love you to review our products for us and you can keep the goods.” You’re already a fan and you’d probably write about them anyway, so why shouldn’t you be compensated (if you wish).

    I love this field we play in but I’m beginning to get jaded with all the “You must do this, you mustn’t do that” posts and missives flying about.

    I know who I am. I know what my ethics are. I know what my transparency is. Can you really tell me what I should or shouldn’t do?

    Thanks Chris, as usual, for keeping it in the hands of the people who know each other best – ourselves.

  • http://www.streamsidefarm.com Cindy C.

    Well said Danny! Although I might have altered “beginning to get jaded”. When I first started on twitter, I wondered that myself. When I started, I wanted to read all the helpful “How to use twittter” posts (and there are myriads). The very first thing I discovered was that everyone was making up their own rules, almost. Ultimately, I guess, the Golden Rule is the best one to encompass all of the subrules.

    (@cynchrys on twitter)

  • http://www.streamsidefarm.com Cindy C.

    Well said Danny! Although I might have altered “beginning to get jaded”. When I first started on twitter, I wondered that myself. When I started, I wanted to read all the helpful “How to use twittter” posts (and there are myriads). The very first thing I discovered was that everyone was making up their own rules, almost. Ultimately, I guess, the Golden Rule is the best one to encompass all of the subrules.

    (@cynchrys on twitter)

  • http://www.uprinting.com/Postcards.html UPrinting Postcard Printing

    Blogging is a business almost for everyone and nothing’s wrong with that. But be sure to be transparent on everything you write in your blogs and no hypocrisy at all. If you want people to keep coming back to your blog, transparency alone is enough.

  • http://www.uprinting.com/Postcards.html UPrinting Postcard Printing

    Blogging is a business almost for everyone and nothing’s wrong with that. But be sure to be transparent on everything you write in your blogs and no hypocrisy at all. If you want people to keep coming back to your blog, transparency alone is enough.

  • http://www.westdeptford.lib.nj.us Carolyn Wood

    mark ivey – “They may be entertaining, educational, inspirational (like you, Chris) and they may “aspire to journalism standards” but they’re not trained journalists.” So true – concrete example – someone could have called me out on the encoding/decoding definition of communication from BusinessDictionary.com. I guess digital attribution is a topic for another time. Thanks for expanding my knowledge base.

  • http://www.westdeptford.lib.nj.us Carolyn Wood

    mark ivey – “They may be entertaining, educational, inspirational (like you, Chris) and they may “aspire to journalism standards” but they’re not trained journalists.” So true – concrete example – someone could have called me out on the encoding/decoding definition of communication from BusinessDictionary.com. I guess digital attribution is a topic for another time. Thanks for expanding my knowledge base.

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  • http://www.WendyPiersall.com Wendy Piersall

    I’m cross posting a comment I made on Valeria’s ConversationAgent blog on this topic, because I believe it bears repeating:

    If I were to give it a *low* ballpark estimate of all of the sponsored post and sponsored link pitches I have turned down over the years, I think I have probably turned away over $50K in revenue, if not more. It’s because they were products or brands I was unwilling to align myself with.

    It is completely unjustifiable to judge a blogger’s ethics based on what they are paid for, unless you also know how they are unwilling to be bought.

  • http://www.WendyPiersall.com Wendy Piersall

    I’m cross posting a comment I made on Valeria’s ConversationAgent blog on this topic, because I believe it bears repeating:

    If I were to give it a *low* ballpark estimate of all of the sponsored post and sponsored link pitches I have turned down over the years, I think I have probably turned away over $50K in revenue, if not more. It’s because they were products or brands I was unwilling to align myself with.

    It is completely unjustifiable to judge a blogger’s ethics based on what they are paid for, unless you also know how they are unwilling to be bought.

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  • http://rolandhesz.com Roland Hesz

    What you wrote Chris about the social webs simply providing tools should not even be a question. The fact that it is suggests that some people have a sort of religious reverence toward the social webs, trying to keep them for the One True Purpose – whatever it should be.
    “I will always be clear about where I’m coming from. ” – that’s the main thing I think.

  • http://heszroland.hu Roland Hesz

    What you wrote Chris about the social webs simply providing tools should not even be a question. The fact that it is suggests that some people have a sort of religious reverence toward the social webs, trying to keep them for the One True Purpose – whatever it should be.
    “I will always be clear about where I’m coming from. ” – that’s the main thing I think.