Tune-Ups

First off, I did a run this morning where I kept my heart rate at-or-under 140 the whole time. Boy, what a different run that was. For one thing, it was nearly impossible to keep my rate low at the start. I had to do this weird pace that felt like my running shoes were tied together at the laces. But then, near the middle, I felt like I had enough energy not to have to walk every four minutes, and I felt like I could run at that pace forever. By the very end, my stride was getting longer and longer, and I had to keep looking at my HRM to see the 140 still there. Felt like more.

Have you done this kind of training? What did you find? Any other thoughts or ideas?

Next, I had my first adjustment appointment with a chiropractor. He said I was looking better already, just from his suggesting the Alexander technique. Boy, crackity crack.

Finally, a meeting with a podiatrist. He said things looked great, that I shouldn’t get orthotics, that I’m wearing the right running shoe for me (NB M716), and he hopes to see me around at the local races.

A great day. Now, debating between going swimming tonight, or running after dark. Toss up.

Oh, and I bought a running hat at EMS today for about 10 or 20 less than other brands I’d seen at other stores. Swell, eh? If I were to talk gear head to toe, it’d look like this:

EMS Hat
Under Armour Shirt
ECG2 Heart Rate Monitor
EMS Running Shorts
Galyans socks
New Balance 716 running shoes.

What’s your gear?

feedback

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  • Anonymous

    I haven’t done any kind of training-just running. Tell me why you train to keep your heart rate low. Does it help with long races? Endurance? By the way, congratulations on your first two!
    Susan

  • Anonymous

    I haven’t done any kind of training-just running. Tell me why you train to keep your heart rate low. Does it help with long races? Endurance? By the way, congratulations on your first two!
    Susan

  • Anonymous

    I haven’t done any kind of training-just running. Tell me why you train to keep your heart rate low. Does it help with long races? Endurance? By the way, congratulations on your first two!
    Susan

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Hi Susan- When your heart rate is lower (in the 60-75% of maximum area), you burn fuel mostly from your fat stores. When your heart rate is up higher (in the 75-90% range), you burn fuel from your glycogen stores. Everyone’s body can only keep about 45 minutes worth of glycogen-based energy on board. Therefore, people doing distance runs either run with hearts conditioned to be working at a lower rate (around 145 bpm), or they consume whatever it is that restores glycogen while on the run. That part of the equation is a little foggy to me still. I’m not hitting distances that require fueling while racing– yet. : )

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Hi Susan- When your heart rate is lower (in the 60-75% of maximum area), you burn fuel mostly from your fat stores. When your heart rate is up higher (in the 75-90% range), you burn fuel from your glycogen stores. Everyone’s body can only keep about 45 minutes worth of glycogen-based energy on board. Therefore, people doing distance runs either run with hearts conditioned to be working at a lower rate (around 145 bpm), or they consume whatever it is that restores glycogen while on the run. That part of the equation is a little foggy to me still. I’m not hitting distances that require fueling while racing– yet. : )

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3043156 Chris

    Hi Susan- When your heart rate is lower (in the 60-75% of maximum area), you burn fuel mostly from your fat stores. When your heart rate is up higher (in the 75-90% range), you burn fuel from your glycogen stores. Everyone’s body can only keep about 45 minutes worth of glycogen-based energy on board. Therefore, people doing distance runs either run with hearts conditioned to be working at a lower rate (around 145 bpm), or they consume whatever it is that restores glycogen while on the run. That part of the equation is a little foggy to me still. I’m not hitting distances that require fueling while racing– yet. : )

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3007407 Marshall

    My gear:
    Hat from RunOn (Local running store) or Nike Headbands (I sweat profusely!)
    Nike wristbands (I recently started purchasing the double wrist band for the summer months)
    Various shirts (some from Under Armour and Mizuno, most from Target)
    Various shorts (some Nike, some RaceReady)
    Various socks (Asics and Target)
    New Balance 110 (the only racewalking shoes on the market)
    Garmin Forerunner 201 GPS Watch or Timex Ironman (for racing)

    Thanks for commenting on my blog! I’m glad to hear someone reads it besides me! ;) Have fun running!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3007407 Marshall

    My gear:
    Hat from RunOn (Local running store) or Nike Headbands (I sweat profusely!)
    Nike wristbands (I recently started purchasing the double wrist band for the summer months)
    Various shirts (some from Under Armour and Mizuno, most from Target)
    Various shorts (some Nike, some RaceReady)
    Various socks (Asics and Target)
    New Balance 110 (the only racewalking shoes on the market)
    Garmin Forerunner 201 GPS Watch or Timex Ironman (for racing)

    Thanks for commenting on my blog! I’m glad to hear someone reads it besides me! ;) Have fun running!

  • http://www.blogger.com/profile/3007407 Marshall

    My gear:
    Hat from RunOn (Local running store) or Nike Headbands (I sweat profusely!)
    Nike wristbands (I recently started purchasing the double wrist band for the summer months)
    Various shirts (some from Under Armour and Mizuno, most from Target)
    Various shorts (some Nike, some RaceReady)
    Various socks (Asics and Target)
    New Balance 110 (the only racewalking shoes on the market)
    Garmin Forerunner 201 GPS Watch or Timex Ironman (for racing)

    Thanks for commenting on my blog! I’m glad to hear someone reads it besides me! ;) Have fun running!

  • Anonymous

    Another thing to consider is that your body changes its energy burning techniques during a run. For the first 15-30 minutes, you are burning mostly glycogen (at a rate determined by your effort). By about 45 minutes into the run, whatever the speed, your body has switched over to burning mostly fat and using the glycogen almost exclusively as a catalyst for the fat-burning. This is one reason why you’ll see people doing 20+ minute warm up runs very slowly before a 5K.

    As for gear… never could get used to a hat, so I wear a random shirt (always technical but I don’t have a particular favorite brand), Nike running shorts, DeFeet Air-E-Ator socks, Saucony Grid Triumph shoes, and my trusty Garmin Forerunner 201.

    -Richard

  • Anonymous

    Another thing to consider is that your body changes its energy burning techniques during a run. For the first 15-30 minutes, you are burning mostly glycogen (at a rate determined by your effort). By about 45 minutes into the run, whatever the speed, your body has switched over to burning mostly fat and using the glycogen almost exclusively as a catalyst for the fat-burning. This is one reason why you’ll see people doing 20+ minute warm up runs very slowly before a 5K.

    As for gear… never could get used to a hat, so I wear a random shirt (always technical but I don’t have a particular favorite brand), Nike running shorts, DeFeet Air-E-Ator socks, Saucony Grid Triumph shoes, and my trusty Garmin Forerunner 201.

    -Richard

  • Anonymous

    Another thing to consider is that your body changes its energy burning techniques during a run. For the first 15-30 minutes, you are burning mostly glycogen (at a rate determined by your effort). By about 45 minutes into the run, whatever the speed, your body has switched over to burning mostly fat and using the glycogen almost exclusively as a catalyst for the fat-burning. This is one reason why you’ll see people doing 20+ minute warm up runs very slowly before a 5K.

    As for gear… never could get used to a hat, so I wear a random shirt (always technical but I don’t have a particular favorite brand), Nike running shorts, DeFeet Air-E-Ator socks, Saucony Grid Triumph shoes, and my trusty Garmin Forerunner 201.

    -Richard

  • http://www.zoombits.co.uk/ micro sd card

    A meeting with a podiatrist. He said that things were much more, I do not have braces, I wear the right shoes for me (NB M716), and hopes to see me around the local race.