Understanding Your Guests

Disneyland Paris Disney theme parks know more about how humans will flow through their systems than any other organization probably knows about its customers. They know how far apart to space trash receptacles. They know where the rest rooms should be. They understand what makes a family linger in a gift shop versus what moves them to the next potential upsell point. And all of those things are invisible to the typical guest to the park, because after all, you’re there to see Mickey or Jack Skellington or whoever your character is (we all have one).

Can we think this way about our online presence? I think so. And it’s important to realize that, just like above, though I know you come here to experience the content, that I’m thinking about the trash receptacles, the rest rooms, and the gift shops along the way.

Understanding Your Guests

When I write a post like 27 blogging secrets to power your community, I know what will happen. It will be bookmarked by people using Delicious. People will pile on bookmarks, which means that it will reach Delicious/popular. That will trigger it to be picked up by Popurls. Then, several robots, including those on Twitter, will pick that post up, and it will get lots of traffic.

I know this because it’s a list, it seems handy, and you want to go back and refer to it later.

What makes a post like that useful? That one’s fairly obvious. It’s promotion. More people find the blog who haven’t seen it before, and that means I capture more new friends and potential community members to have conversations with.

Are there other traffic experiences where I know the outcome ahead of time? Yes. Here’s a list.

Traffic Experiences in My Park

  • Big list posts – visibility by tons of bookmarks. (see above)
  • Videoblog posts – few comments, but a nice level of engagement. The videoblog posts are a way to show you my human side, which is more of a loyalty experience. I do that so you see that I’m real, and human, and just like you.
  • Posts about sharing thoughts – posts like your 3 goals for 2009 are designed for the community to share and talk with each other. The goal there is for me not to be the center, but the starter. What also happens, as you can see by the 48 trackbacks (and counting) is that people link to a post like that to make sure their post about the same topic is discovered. Trackbacks tell Google that there’s something useful happening over at chrisbrogan.com
  • Posts about software – when I write a piece about something like how I use Twitter at volume, I’m not expecting a lot of comments, but I know I’m going to get lots of eyes on the post. The reason is simple: we’re all looking for ways to improve how we use the web. This sometimes translates to links, but definitely always translates to new community members.
  • Pointer posts (where I write just to link to something else) – do just that. They shunt traffic to places where I want eyes to be. Posts like 8 Marketing Bloggers to Watch in 2009 are written so that you’ll visit those other people, and not stick around the blog. That’s also the goal of any sponsored post I write. I’d rather you check out the sponsor than get into it with me in the comments section.

The Importance of Knowing Your Guests

People want to have a good experience with your content. They want their expectations met. If you come here, you’re hoping that I’ll give you another thought about business communication. Thus, if I write way off topic, I know most times what you’ll do. If it’s a “woe is me” post, you’ll be comforting. If I write a “my family’s awesome post,” you’ll agree. That’s because you and I have built a relationship. We know each other enough to celebrate each other’s successes.

But I know why you come here, and so I never intend to dwell on matters that run too far afield of business communications and emerging technology.

It’s important to build your content, your online experience, the interaction of humans and your digital “stuff” such that your guests have the experience you hope they will with you and your presence.

What do you think about all this? Does the above make sense? Can you see where your own sites and your own material does different things for different types of posts? Am I seeing my own site and your experience with it accurately?

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  • http://franklinbishop.net/ Blog Expert

    It is very important to understand your guests. It is difficult to know a lot about your own visitors so it is hard to compare it to something like Disney. They have tons of money to figure out every little thing were people like me are not that lucky.

  • http://franklinbishop.net/ Blog Expert

    It is very important to understand your guests. It is difficult to know a lot about your own visitors so it is hard to compare it to something like Disney. They have tons of money to figure out every little thing were people like me are not that lucky.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    You all give me every bit as much back as I give to you. There are at least 4 blog post ideas in the comments now. I’ll get started on them tonight. Thanks.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com chrisbrogan

    You all give me every bit as much back as I give to you. There are at least 4 blog post ideas in the comments now. I’ll get started on them tonight. Thanks.

  • http://rachaelpachel.blogspot.com/ rachael

    What if I am still trying to understand my OWN self, now I have to be responsible for my guests too? ;)

    Great post!

  • http://rachaelpachel.blogspot.com/ rachael

    What if I am still trying to understand my OWN self, now I have to be responsible for my guests too? ;)

    Great post!

  • http://www.musingsforadarkenedroom.com Mike Wilton

    Great post Chris. It’s definitely important to understand your guests and use the power of analytical data and traffic data to help give the best reader experience. I’ve been able to taylor make a number of blog posts related to my content based on keyword traffic and analytics data alone and those posts are almost always a hit. It can always help you develop content you know that many of your readers or people looking for information on your topics are looking for.

    I was amused that you brought up the trash receptacle reference when you talked about Disney. I worked at the house of mouse for five years and one of the things I learned while working for them was how they came up with the spacing. Apparently one day while Disneyland was being built Walt handed a friend of his a piece of candy and then counted the number of steps it took for his friend to open the candy and pop it in his mouth. That number of steps is what is used to space trash cans to help prevent litter. Just thought I’d share that one, because I always found the concept behind it amusing.

  • http://www.musingsforadarkenedroom.com Mike Wilton

    Great post Chris. It’s definitely important to understand your guests and use the power of analytical data and traffic data to help give the best reader experience. I’ve been able to taylor make a number of blog posts related to my content based on keyword traffic and analytics data alone and those posts are almost always a hit. It can always help you develop content you know that many of your readers or people looking for information on your topics are looking for.

    I was amused that you brought up the trash receptacle reference when you talked about Disney. I worked at the house of mouse for five years and one of the things I learned while working for them was how they came up with the spacing. Apparently one day while Disneyland was being built Walt handed a friend of his a piece of candy and then counted the number of steps it took for his friend to open the candy and pop it in his mouth. That number of steps is what is used to space trash cans to help prevent litter. Just thought I’d share that one, because I always found the concept behind it amusing.

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  • http://www.mizfitOnline.com MizFit

    as always so interesting and, as always, the blogword can seem SO unpredictable.

    I love your notion of the readers as guests and say, at MizFit, that my blog blossomed commentwise when my readers took it on as their own and no longer thought of themselves as guests but part owners….as members (the began to refer to themselves as the bumbling band).

    I really enjoy your videoposts AND doing my own. the feedback Ive received is that my readers like knowing that, every monday no matter the TOPIC, they see my face.

    Carla

  • http://www.mizfitOnline.com MizFit

    as always so interesting and, as always, the blogword can seem SO unpredictable.

    I love your notion of the readers as guests and say, at MizFit, that my blog blossomed commentwise when my readers took it on as their own and no longer thought of themselves as guests but part owners….as members (the began to refer to themselves as the bumbling band).

    I really enjoy your videoposts AND doing my own. the feedback Ive received is that my readers like knowing that, every monday no matter the TOPIC, they see my face.

    Carla

  • http://insightsandingenuity.com Heather Rast

    I’m really glad I saw your tweet today and was driven to read this particular post (whew, you’re smokin with the ’09 content already!). It strikes me for a couple of reasons.

    One, yesterday I discovered a critique tweet via Twit(urly) someone (whom I hadn’t been following) made about a post I’d written several months ago. Their critique was hurtful, but moreover their thoughts weren’t directed to me personally and they offered no specifics. So I didn’t have an opportunity to engage them in discussion, nor learn really what they felt the piece lacked (for them). Their comment stung, but thankfully I was able to talk myself into accepting that I’d put myself in this space and in doing so, am subject to the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    But I really wish I’d had the chance to learn more about this persons’ thoughts. Maybe it would be valuable, maybe it wouldn’t be; I could weigh and measure that through discovery process. But I didn’t have the opportunity, so their opinion sits there–and I’m unable to potentially improve my content.

    Your observations above are astute and no doubt developed over your years of blogging (and engaging) experience. What I’m learning here is:
    1) being in tune with your audience and their information needs is critical
    2) remember goal is to engage, not talk ‘to,’ so solicit opinions and even controversy
    3) variety keeps things interesting, and draws new eyeballs
    4) be multi-dimensional and humanize your writing; helps people relate
    5) be sure of your focus, and stand true

    My (late) second reason is this–the humility and earnestness of your writing and content never ceases to amaze me, reinforcing my conviction about community as a brand-builder and marketing mindset. It’s my hope that more companies seeking to evolve their strategies pay attention. Thank you.

  • http://insightsandingenuity.com Heather Rast

    I’m really glad I saw your tweet today and was driven to read this particular post (whew, you’re smokin with the ’09 content already!). It strikes me for a couple of reasons.

    One, yesterday I discovered a critique tweet via Twit(urly) someone (whom I hadn’t been following) made about a post I’d written several months ago. Their critique was hurtful, but moreover their thoughts weren’t directed to me personally and they offered no specifics. So I didn’t have an opportunity to engage them in discussion, nor learn really what they felt the piece lacked (for them). Their comment stung, but thankfully I was able to talk myself into accepting that I’d put myself in this space and in doing so, am subject to the good, the bad, and the ugly.

    But I really wish I’d had the chance to learn more about this persons’ thoughts. Maybe it would be valuable, maybe it wouldn’t be; I could weigh and measure that through discovery process. But I didn’t have the opportunity, so their opinion sits there–and I’m unable to potentially improve my content.

    Your observations above are astute and no doubt developed over your years of blogging (and engaging) experience. What I’m learning here is:
    1) being in tune with your audience and their information needs is critical
    2) remember goal is to engage, not talk ‘to,’ so solicit opinions and even controversy
    3) variety keeps things interesting, and draws new eyeballs
    4) be multi-dimensional and humanize your writing; helps people relate
    5) be sure of your focus, and stand true

    My (late) second reason is this–the humility and earnestness of your writing and content never ceases to amaze me, reinforcing my conviction about community as a brand-builder and marketing mindset. It’s my hope that more companies seeking to evolve their strategies pay attention. Thank you.

  • http://wiktorcegla.pl Wiktor

    Chris, add one more experience: “And when I write posts like this, I get some traffic/I redirect my readers to my older posts that may have been overlooked. I do it because I know that the majority of my readers don’t read each and every post on my blog”.

    And besides, it’s a pitty that WordPress cant show You how many people started their own blogs RIGHT AFTER they finished reading one of Your posts (has anyone thought of some kind of an WP affiliate link, just to measure it? :). I guess the number would be amongst the highest around the web.

  • http://wiktorcegla.pl Wiktor

    Chris, add one more experience: “And when I write posts like this, I get some traffic/I redirect my readers to my older posts that may have been overlooked. I do it because I know that the majority of my readers don’t read each and every post on my blog”.

    And besides, it’s a pitty that WordPress cant show You how many people started their own blogs RIGHT AFTER they finished reading one of Your posts (has anyone thought of some kind of an WP affiliate link, just to measure it? :). I guess the number would be amongst the highest around the web.

  • http://thingsyoushoulddo.com juliemarg

    Thank you Chris,

    I love the Disney Park analogy and it makes it easy to explain my site’s main problem.

    I can’t come up with a good navigation plan. I’ve got some great content, but my visitors don’t know how to find the things that might interest them most. It’s like walking in the park entrance and having no directions to Pirates of the Caribbean.

    I’ll keep plugging away and I appreciate a way to explain it.

    Julie

  • http://thingsyoushoulddo.com juliemarg

    Thank you Chris,

    I love the Disney Park analogy and it makes it easy to explain my site’s main problem.

    I can’t come up with a good navigation plan. I’ve got some great content, but my visitors don’t know how to find the things that might interest them most. It’s like walking in the park entrance and having no directions to Pirates of the Caribbean.

    I’ll keep plugging away and I appreciate a way to explain it.

    Julie

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    Chris,
    I don’t disagree with your comments on what drives bookmarking, traffic, eyeballs, etc, but I feel you might be missing a category… For any blog to be successful, the author has to establish an amount of credibility, thought leadership, etc, and does so by writing those posts that truly cause people to think about the world in a different way.

    I’m not convinced that raw volume of comments is a good indicator of this effect, as people comment on blogs for many reasons, and sometimes the more profound articles (or more profound blogs) may not have the most comment volume.

    Does that type of post fit in? How do you measure how effective it was at causing the readers to truly stop and think?

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    Chris,
    I don’t disagree with your comments on what drives bookmarking, traffic, eyeballs, etc, but I feel you might be missing a category… For any blog to be successful, the author has to establish an amount of credibility, thought leadership, etc, and does so by writing those posts that truly cause people to think about the world in a different way.

    I’m not convinced that raw volume of comments is a good indicator of this effect, as people comment on blogs for many reasons, and sometimes the more profound articles (or more profound blogs) may not have the most comment volume.

    Does that type of post fit in? How do you measure how effective it was at causing the readers to truly stop and think?

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan…

    @Steven – That’s a great point. Thought leadership is in the same category as “thinking” piece. Here’s the thing: traffic-wise, those pieces usually blow. Not sure why, but my posts where I think I’ve said something really meaningful are always the worst “performers” from any kind of audience point of view. People might like them, but if they do, they tell no one, say nothing, and run away.

    That said, if you don’t do things to maintain thought leadership, why should people bother going to your blog?

    Thanks for that perspective.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan…

    @Steven – That’s a great point. Thought leadership is in the same category as “thinking” piece. Here’s the thing: traffic-wise, those pieces usually blow. Not sure why, but my posts where I think I’ve said something really meaningful are always the worst “performers” from any kind of audience point of view. People might like them, but if they do, they tell no one, say nothing, and run away.

    That said, if you don’t do things to maintain thought leadership, why should people bother going to your blog?

    Thanks for that perspective.

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    Chris,
    It’s interesting because it is a very similar debate to what I see a lot of in analyzing all sorts of marketing (especially longer sales cycle). If you don’t establish thought leadership and expertise, your sales will not do well, BUT, the marketing initiatives that generate thought leaderships and establish expertise are almost always terrible at generating direct leads. So, intuitively, we all know we must do them, but the analytics points us away from them as tactics. Thanks for the perspective though from your position in social media, it’s interesting to see that a similar model holds…

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    Chris,
    It’s interesting because it is a very similar debate to what I see a lot of in analyzing all sorts of marketing (especially longer sales cycle). If you don’t establish thought leadership and expertise, your sales will not do well, BUT, the marketing initiatives that generate thought leaderships and establish expertise are almost always terrible at generating direct leads. So, intuitively, we all know we must do them, but the analytics points us away from them as tactics. Thanks for the perspective though from your position in social media, it’s interesting to see that a similar model holds…

  • http://www.GaryMcElwain.com Gary McElwain

    Hi Chris

    Vey interesting concept and analogy. Using a theme park as a mind map for your blog makes great sense from a marketing stand point. I was reading a nother post where the writer used the analogy of a rose garden.

    The great thing about the theme park scheme is there are no long lines to wait in. Either pick the thrill ride or the carousel, evena the ferris wheel will give you a different view. But I just came off the water ride, so which way to the rest room

    Gary McElwain

  • http://www.GaryMcElwain.com Gary McElwain

    Hi Chris

    Vey interesting concept and analogy. Using a theme park as a mind map for your blog makes great sense from a marketing stand point. I was reading a nother post where the writer used the analogy of a rose garden.

    The great thing about the theme park scheme is there are no long lines to wait in. Either pick the thrill ride or the carousel, evena the ferris wheel will give you a different view. But I just came off the water ride, so which way to the rest room

    Gary McElwain

  • http://smartboydesigns.com Smart Boy

    Chris, I thoroughly enjoyed this post. Your analogy regarding blogging and Disney was superb. I have always agreed that it’s important to learn from big business – and garner lessons from their success.

    Walt Disney created an empire. Isn’t that what we’re trying to accomplish in each of our niches?

  • http://smartboydesigns.com Smart Boy

    Chris, I thoroughly enjoyed this post. Your analogy regarding blogging and Disney was superb. I have always agreed that it’s important to learn from big business – and garner lessons from their success.

    Walt Disney created an empire. Isn’t that what we’re trying to accomplish in each of our niches?

  • http://www.workhappynow.com Karl Staib – Work Happy Now

    I’m working on building my online presence in the “work happiness” industry. It’s a small niche now, but I expect it to explode soon. I’m going into my second year of blogging and I feel like I’m just learning to grasp what my readers want. It’s hard in the beginning because there isn’t much feedback.

    I think the most important part is watching for the subtle signs that a lot of bloggers miss. A link or a small comment can open a whole area of research and writing you never considered.

  • http://www.workhappynow.com Karl Staib – Work Happy Now

    I’m working on building my online presence in the “work happiness” industry. It’s a small niche now, but I expect it to explode soon. I’m going into my second year of blogging and I feel like I’m just learning to grasp what my readers want. It’s hard in the beginning because there isn’t much feedback.

    I think the most important part is watching for the subtle signs that a lot of bloggers miss. A link or a small comment can open a whole area of research and writing you never considered.

  • http://blog.tomabonciu.ro Toma Bonciu – SEO Services

    Hi Chris,

    Knowing the people that visit your blog and what they expect to find and read is one of the things you can do in order to get them to come back. When you experience something that impresses you in a good way you’ll most likely want to experience it again. Especially if the person creating the experience is trying to bring something new for you but in the same boundaries.

    In time every blogger develops a certain relation with his readers – but in time. That is why every post you write receives dozens of comments and in my case my personal best is 10 comments. Trust is something that takes time to be earned but once you got it if you play your cards right you’ll get only benefits.

    Thank you for your article.
    WebOptimization on Twitter

  • http://blog.tomabonciu.ro Toma Bonciu – SEO Services

    Hi Chris,

    Knowing the people that visit your blog and what they expect to find and read is one of the things you can do in order to get them to come back. When you experience something that impresses you in a good way you’ll most likely want to experience it again. Especially if the person creating the experience is trying to bring something new for you but in the same boundaries.

    In time every blogger develops a certain relation with his readers – but in time. That is why every post you write receives dozens of comments and in my case my personal best is 10 comments. Trust is something that takes time to be earned but once you got it if you play your cards right you’ll get only benefits.

    Thank you for your article.
    WebOptimization on Twitter

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan…

    Another analogy that comes to mind often involves bands. If I play my “old favorite” song that made #1 on the charts, then you’re happy. If I experiment with new stuff, a small percentage of you are happy. It’s a mix game, doing a bit of both, that keeps things growing. Right?

    Look at Sting’s LATEST effort, with the lute guy, etc.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan…

    Another analogy that comes to mind often involves bands. If I play my “old favorite” song that made #1 on the charts, then you’re happy. If I experiment with new stuff, a small percentage of you are happy. It’s a mix game, doing a bit of both, that keeps things growing. Right?

    Look at Sting’s LATEST effort, with the lute guy, etc.

  • http://thefuturebuzz.com Adam Singer

    @Steven – Read this, as I think it touches on what you said

    How not to sell out:
    http://www.skelliewag.org/how-not-to-sell-out-583.htm

  • http://thefuturebuzz.com Adam Singer

    @Steven – Read this, as I think it touches on what you said

    How not to sell out:
    http://www.skelliewag.org/how-not-to-sell-out-583.htm

  • http://nickyjameson.com Nicky Jameson

    These are interesting analogies. The one thing that underlines them all is experience over time.And a certain amount of expertise in knowing what to look for. Both Disney and other companies assess their customers over time and then gear their offerings to those customers. With a blog you can do this too, however I think it’s also important to note this happens over time.

    I had been blogging for nearly a year on a range of subjects on my Blog 1. I was always curious about what my stats were telling me – which was that certain posts were getting more attention than others – why?. In this case I looked at time on site and traffic to content rather than comments. I also found that even the way in which I wrote a post could alter the response to it. I discovered a lot of things through reviewing stats.
    and I’m a great believer in using them as well as what’s happening on your site. But again: time, experimentation and patience. On a fairly new blog you’re not going to get those insights until much later on… if you are looking for them
    I’ve always tended to mix it up in terms of styles of post. I’ve not categorised them in quite the way you have (response expected) so that’s something to explore.

    It will be interesting to look at the expected responses to the different types of posts i do, although.. it may vary depending on the audience, what they want and topic.

    One big thing for me is that if a reader says “I read your post and remembered it when was doing X and it helped me” I will tend to ensure more of that type of post if they’ve not been common.
    Thought provoking post. I shall bookmark.

  • http://nickyjameson.com Nicky Jameson

    These are interesting analogies. The one thing that underlines them all is experience over time.And a certain amount of expertise in knowing what to look for. Both Disney and other companies assess their customers over time and then gear their offerings to those customers. With a blog you can do this too, however I think it’s also important to note this happens over time.

    I had been blogging for nearly a year on a range of subjects on my Blog 1. I was always curious about what my stats were telling me – which was that certain posts were getting more attention than others – why?. In this case I looked at time on site and traffic to content rather than comments. I also found that even the way in which I wrote a post could alter the response to it. I discovered a lot of things through reviewing stats.
    and I’m a great believer in using them as well as what’s happening on your site. But again: time, experimentation and patience. On a fairly new blog you’re not going to get those insights until much later on… if you are looking for them
    I’ve always tended to mix it up in terms of styles of post. I’ve not categorised them in quite the way you have (response expected) so that’s something to explore.

    It will be interesting to look at the expected responses to the different types of posts i do, although.. it may vary depending on the audience, what they want and topic.

    One big thing for me is that if a reader says “I read your post and remembered it when was doing X and it helped me” I will tend to ensure more of that type of post if they’ve not been common.
    Thought provoking post. I shall bookmark.

  • http://www.site-seeker.com/briansblog Site-Seeker | b2b internet mar

    Thanks for your insight! We are new to blogging, and have found it to be fun but challenging. I appreciated your point about video blog posts and how they allow you to display your human side.

    Thank again!
    Brian

  • http://www.site-seeker.com/briansblog Site-Seeker | b2b internet marketing | brian bluff

    Thanks for your insight! We are new to blogging, and have found it to be fun but challenging. I appreciated your point about video blog posts and how they allow you to display your human side.

    Thank again!
    Brian

  • http://twitter.com/pinkolivefamily Sus @pinkolivefamily

    What I liked about this post was the fact that it seemed to follow the “flow” from your past post with more detailed content. Also, as I have been thinking more about generating valuable contents for future blog sites, your post generated additional insight for me which I am happy to share with other others in social media world. As always your content on the site is directed toward your audience which u seem to know ur own demographics of readers which helps to come back on a daily basis for me. It makes sense for me and your traffic experience overview was just superrrr so thx! p.s. ur fan site on Facebook – is “about” time LOL ~ honestly was happy to see that just now.. best wishes! ~ Sus @pinkolivefamily

  • http://twitter.com/pinkolivefamily Sus @pinkolivefamily

    What I liked about this post was the fact that it seemed to follow the “flow” from your past post with more detailed content. Also, as I have been thinking more about generating valuable contents for future blog sites, your post generated additional insight for me which I am happy to share with other others in social media world. As always your content on the site is directed toward your audience which u seem to know ur own demographics of readers which helps to come back on a daily basis for me. It makes sense for me and your traffic experience overview was just superrrr so thx! p.s. ur fan site on Facebook – is “about” time LOL ~ honestly was happy to see that just now.. best wishes! ~ Sus @pinkolivefamily

  • http://www.chrisloft.com Chris Loft

    I enjoyed this post very much. You have a good, commonsense style of communicating. We need to embrace new ways of connecting and interacting with people – and not just as ‘punters’. You use some interesting analogies: disney theme parks, visibility, promotion, eyeballs – our guests will soon just be “bums on seats” – mere punters, waiting in line to purchase or download something reduced to mass consumerism. Sorry, getting carried away somewhere that this article has led me.
    I have to disagree about one thing though: you have to listen to more new music – that ‘old stuff’ is far too boring, and haven’t you heard it all before?

  • http://www.chrisloft.com Chris Loft

    I enjoyed this post very much. You have a good, commonsense style of communicating. We need to embrace new ways of connecting and interacting with people – and not just as ‘punters’. You use some interesting analogies: disney theme parks, visibility, promotion, eyeballs – our guests will soon just be “bums on seats” – mere punters, waiting in line to purchase or download something reduced to mass consumerism. Sorry, getting carried away somewhere that this article has led me.
    I have to disagree about one thing though: you have to listen to more new music – that ‘old stuff’ is far too boring, and haven’t you heard it all before?

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    @Adam, thanks for the Skelliewag link, I definitely enjoyed that and hadn’t seen it before. Great point on bands too @Chris, it all comes down to what you want to be as a writer. The Smiths may have been one of the most influential bands of the last few decades, but they did a lot of very novel things, and did not just try to create music for popularity’s sake. Influential, but not as commercially successful as Madonna. Similar choices to what we each make (although at a much more micro level), I suppose.

  • http://digitalbodylanguage.blogspot.com Steven Woods

    @Adam, thanks for the Skelliewag link, I definitely enjoyed that and hadn’t seen it before. Great point on bands too @Chris, it all comes down to what you want to be as a writer. The Smiths may have been one of the most influential bands of the last few decades, but they did a lot of very novel things, and did not just try to create music for popularity’s sake. Influential, but not as commercially successful as Madonna. Similar choices to what we each make (although at a much more micro level), I suppose.

  • http://www.strawberrycommunications.com.au Johanna Baker-Dowdell

    Very thought-provoking post. I don’t analyse my stats too much, but this has given me a reason to put more thought into it.

    Thanks

  • http://www.strawberrycommunications.com.au Johanna Baker-Dowdell

    Very thought-provoking post. I don’t analyse my stats too much, but this has given me a reason to put more thought into it.

    Thanks

  • http://www.untangletheweb.com.au Amanda Jephtha

    Thank you, Chris. There aren’t too many blogs/posts which make me stop and think terribly hard, but this one had me gazing out the window for an age.

  • http://www.untangletheweb.com.au Amanda Jephtha

    Thank you, Chris. There aren’t too many blogs/posts which make me stop and think terribly hard, but this one had me gazing out the window for an age.

  • http://murphguide.blogspot.com Murph

    Good stuff, Chris.

    One of my new year’s resolutions is to read your blog regularly and apply what I learn.