Where Would You Start?

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It’s a simple question, but not an easy one. If you had a friend or business connection come to you and say that they wanted to improve their online experience, where would you start?

If you were me, you’d start by understanding the goals that brought about the request. For instance, do they want more sales, more customer awareness, more presence, more connectivity, more lead generation? That’s what I’d do after hearing that question.

That’s one reason we built The Pulse Network. You see an Internet TV station when you look at it. We see a lead generation and nurturing platform.

That’s why we built Home Base Maker. If you’re getting that question about how to improve one’s online presence, I wanted to provide one piece of the puzzle so that you could focus on the rest.

That’s why Joe Sorge and I work so hard at Kitchen Table Companies. We are answering any questions about business, including things to do with how to improve online presence.

Most of the people at Third Tribe Marketing already have started. They’re asking another question.

So, my question to you: when faced with that experience, where do you start?

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  • http://www.ricardobueno.com Ricardo Bueno

    Ok Chris, first of all… You’re on a roll! Way to subtly launch “Home Base Maker” (unless I missed the announcement somewhere else) – I really like it!

    Second, at my company, we’re asked by clients on how to improve their effectiveness online all the time. How to use our product better, how to maximize the web. I always start with a one hour session on what they’ve been doing to date.

    How are you marketing your business right now? What’s seems to work? What isn’t working?

    Then, just sit back and listen. Don’t interrupt. Just listen.

    • http://twitter.com/WRNMontco WRN Montco

      I agree with Ricardo. You need to know what they already have in place not only what works or doesn’t but why it is or isn’t. I think too many people who are successful online or are in the business of assisting people with their online experience forget that each experience and their potential success is based on their comfort level and where they are offline. If they don’t know how to network offline they will find it difficult to network online. If they don’t already know their message or have a faulty company structure for handling customers, putting a business online is only going to put a spotlight on it and make it worse.

      I want anyone I give advice to or work with as a client to be as successful as they can be. They are a product of my work so I need to be sure I put them in the best light to succeed. That all begins with getting to know them and as Ricardo just stated, listen.

  • http://www.andicrook.com Andrew Crook

    Been a while since I been here great articles as always.

  • http://fingercandymedia.com/ Jessica Northey

    I work backwards from what the ultimate goals are and here is why:

    At least once a week I get a call, that goes something like this: “I need to be on the social media”. I then ask “why?” Followed by DEAD SILENCE, and at that moment I can hear the “dear in the headlights look” OVER the phone. 

    The sensationalism of Social Media has the music and broadcasting industry in a super-sized fervor and everyone knows they need to be there, but at the end of day they don’t know the “why”. Since my days of selling traditional advertising I have always said, “Determine goals and you manage your own expectations.”

    I sure as heck, may not be the smartest, slickest Social Media Evangelist/Consultant out there, but I damn sure was a top marketing/account manager in the Broadcasting industry….I made a LOT of money, helping other people make a LOT of money. I still follow the same CNA (Client Needs Analysis) process that did me right all those years.  When speaking with a prospective client I help them identify and narrow goals to a manageable place, and then work backwards from what they have in mind as end result to create a map/plan(proposal) of how they will get there…but then thats just me, what do I know?

  • http://goinswriter.com/ Jeff Goins

    Just because I’m a blogger, I tend to start with content, asking the questions: What do you have to offer? What makes you unique? How can we share that or communicate it?

  • http://twitter.com/phillyrealty Christopher Somers

    Would do the same in terms of asking the questions as far as what is the ultimate goal – lead generation, traffic to website, building content, etc…  .  It is important to know what the goals are and then go from there.  Also agree with Jessica’s comment.  Is important to know what your online strategy is before jumping in head first.   

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  • Chendry

    Nice clarification to help all of us understand why it’s not just one big company. 

    • http://rickmanelius.com Rick Manelius

      I agree. I know ‘packaging’ is one of Chris’ 3 words this year, but I still didn’t really feel like I could explain the different parts/components/companies to someone else if asked. This post helps out a lot.

  • http://thoughtsaboutnothing.com @kylereed

     I get this question a lot about blogging…where do I start? My simple answer is…anywhere, except for make it private at first. Anytime someone tells me they want to start blogging I always say start tomorrow but start writing drafts, start “blogging” everyday but keep them to yourself. Not only does that allow you to develop your voice, see your niche, but it also gives you three weeks of content. 

    But I also think in any circumstance knowing yourself and your identity is important. Most people (myself included) want to start something because they have seen someone else have success. They go in with the idea they will be just like that person and often lie to themselves about reality and who they really are. 

  • http://twitter.com/followcb christopher bartlett

    I believe that we start at the beginning, much like entering a live event, with a pocketful of goals and a boat load of observation…. Where we think we are going may not be where the journey takes us.  We may learn many new things, both large and small, that change our game plan.  Discovery leads to action, action leads to movement, and movement leads to change. Good one, CB!
    And I agree with JG here!

  • Ford

    Suggest starting by asking “who cares?” or “so what?” or “what can I (or my business) offer that others either are not offering or cannot offer?.”
    Few businesses consciously start with either an understanding of what’s missing in a particular market segment or how they can become defined differently by their market, audience or community.
    Other ways of thinking about the starting point are: “What do you want to stand for? How do you want to be known?” Naturally having insight to what a particular community of people will value (providing pleasure or relieving pain) is essential.
    Lastly, remember, as I recall Guy Kawasaki observing in his book, “The Art of the Start,” don’t think you’re the only one with a new idea. It’s likely there are a half-dozen others around the world already working on it. So get busy.

    • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

      Well said! 

  • Ford

    Suggest starting by asking “who cares?” or “so what?” or “what can I (or my business) offer that others either are not offering or cannot offer?.”
    Few businesses consciously start with either an understanding of what’s missing in a particular market segment or how they can become defined differently by their market, audience or community.
    Other ways of thinking about the starting point are: “What do you want to stand for? How do you want to be known?” Naturally having insight to what a particular community of people will value (providing pleasure or relieving pain) is essential.
    Lastly, remember, as I recall Guy Kawasaki observing in his book, “The Art of the Start,” don’t think you’re the only one with a new idea. It’s likely there are a half-dozen others around the world already working on it. So get busy.

  • http://www.inspotgraphics.com Mike Johnson

     Chris, I have to ask you a question…

    How come there are no Social Media links on the Kitchen Table Company’s site? Isn’t that a pretty big issue? Mike J.

  • http://www.breakbumper.tv Ramon B. Nuez Jr.

     @chrisbrogan:twitter In line with what you mentioned — goals — I would also ask about the brands objectives, tactics and key performance indicators (KPI). Each of these questions will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of what is the brands ultimate objective or objectives. In line with what you mentioned — goals — I would also ask about the brands objectives, tactics and key performance indicators (KPI). Each of these questions will undoubtedly lead to a better understanding of what is the brands ultimate objective or objectives.

  • http://matthewtbrowning.com Matthew T. Browning

    It’s very important to begin with the end in mind, as you’ve stated here.  Without having a clear, tangible object to go for, you’re just running around aimlessly!

  • http://rickmanelius.com Rick Manelius

    I try to start with TIME. People seem to be moving so fast sometimes that they don’t really take the time to plan out, understand, question, etc.

    Some of the other commenters can some great suggestions, particularly the questions listed by Ford. But without the time (due to opportunity costs and the need to make ends meet), it’s hard to formulate a plan.

  • http://rickmanelius.com Rick Manelius

    I try to start with TIME. People seem to be moving so fast sometimes that they don’t really take the time to plan out, understand, question, etc.

    Some of the other commenters can some great suggestions, particularly the questions listed by Ford. But without the time (due to opportunity costs and the need to make ends meet), it’s hard to formulate a plan.

  • http://www.clarabelamedia.com Clarabela

     My question is: How do you find the time and energy to accomplish all of this and still writing a blog post every day? 

  • http://twitter.com/RyanCritchett Ryan Critchett

     Great post, solid takeaways Chris. 

    I would certainly take your approach and I’d try to elicit whether or not they’re excited about meeting new people and linking up in a very strangely awesome way with a bunch of strangers from all around the world. 

    Then if they weren’t psyched about that, I’d make them! 

  • http://hobbyarticledirectory.net/ hobby article directory

    Chris nice work,  with out having any specific  objective,you can’t success even though if you have plenty resources,you will not able to organised it.

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  • http://www.goingpublic.us/ going public

    Chris great work, i think setting objective you can’t success,so first of all you should set your objective then organised your available resources,to achieve your objective….Chris you are really helping all the professional and business students thanks a lot.

  • http://www.goingpublic.us/ going public

    Chris great work, i think setting objective you can’t success,so first of all you should set your objective then organised your available resources,to achieve your objective….Chris you are really helping all the professional and business students thanks a lot.