You are the President of Your Career

people working This year is slated to be tricky. If you’re an employee, it’s tough because your budget was just cut. It’s tough because some people were just laid off. It’s tough because you’re going to have to do more with what little you have. They want more from you. Oh, and were you thinking about your career as if it were something moving up and to the right? Uh, no.

The thing is, there really never was a career path for you. That was something for your dad, or you about four careers ago. But those paths are gone. There’s not really even an indent any more where they were left. So, let’s just level with you now: congratulations. You’re the president of your career.

What Businesses and Organizations Want

Here’s a secret, and hopefully this will really help. Businesses (and we can apply this to nonprofits and other organizations, too) want to do what it takes to achieve their mission. In most cases, this is simple: make more money than it spends. In non-profits and other organizations, the goals are slightly different, but you get the gist. Essentially, do your job with the least amount of friction, and get out, and go home.

Variation on the Theme: Self-Employment

You might work for yourself. Rejoice. It’s a tricky year to be doing this. You’ve got to justify yourself to your clients, and if not, you’ve got to deal with the reduction in what people can pay you. You might even be rethinking what comes next.

(By the way, if this is not so, just stop reading. Congrats. You’re doing a great job. Go out and play for 2 hours.)

In All Cases, Here’s What’s Next

You need to take over the role of president of your career. If you’re solo or an employee, this is relatively the same advice: you’ve got to take a look into the entire package of of you as a business, you as a presence, you as a developing “property.” Here are some considerations for the situation you’ve just inherited:

  • Because people just want you to do your job, assume that most people don’t care about your personal development or what goes into how you do what you do.
  • Understand that just doing what you’ve been doing won’t really work for more than a handful of months, because everything around you is changing. If you don’t change, you’ll fall behind.
  • Accept that you have to invest in yourself, and that just waiting around for others to think about your career or invest in it isn’t really going to net you much.

A Simple Prescription

For your career, I recommend that you build your future around a model something like this:

  • Practice making the work you perform reliable, remarkable, and tied to whatever your “client” considers important. That sounds easy, but as yourself whether this is true of what you’re doing. If not, is it really the right business relationship?
  • If the wave of thoughts that just flooded your head involved all the difficulties in shifting roles, ask yourself whether those very thoughts are what have held you in your current role for as long as you’ve been there. Ask yourself if you think you’re only worth a 3% annual raise (or x dollars an hour).
  • If you are not building small powerful networks of some kind, get started. Now. Nothing is a solo sport any longer. Even if you’re the only gunslinger in town, sign up for the gunslinger social network and get to know how others are doing their job. Interesting perspective on this by John Chow, actually. Read the whole piece.
  • Set your own goals in front of yourself. Make them SMART goals. (Half of you rolled your eyes because you’ve heard this. The others are waiting). SMART stands for “Simple, Measurable, Attainable, Realistic, and Timely.” (See more here or even better, here). Don’t say, “I want to make more money in 2009.” Say, “I want to book 10% more business in Q1, 15% in Q2, and make 30% overall more income by the end of 2009.”
  • Chunking goals up is even better. Wanting to build a better proposal template by mid-January and then wanting to book 5 new clients using that form by March is better than putting the whole thing together in one form.
  • Going back to school isn’t always the answer. But sometimes it is. Think long and hard if you’re going back to school simply because you don’t know what else to do. There are lots of ways to train into new skills that don’t involve going back to school. School is a great place to learn what was relevant five years ago. Things are moving much faster than that. Do you really think it will upgrade your career? (Waiting to hear from my higher ed friends on this one).
  • Instead, read. Learn. Absorb. Try things out. If you haven’t created a “lab” for your ideas, for your opportunity to try things out, get started.
  • If your self-esteem is still an issue, and you haven’t bought and read Self-Esteem by Dr Matthew McKay, stop what you’re doing and buy the book. It changed my life. It probably could help you, too. (Faith helps, but that’s not my department. That’s his).
  • Learn the basics of these functions: sales, marketing, project management, journalism, and law. Even understanding some of the basic premises behind those types of roles and job functions will help you better understand how to function within an organization. I wasn’t the best engineer in my company. I was the engineer who could talk plainly about technology to the senior team. Made a world of difference.

Your Mileage Will Vary

There are lots of reasons to be negative. You have plenty of opportunities to find reasons why none of the above will work for you. You can pile excuses up, one on top of the other, for every reason why you’re stuck where you are. Gandhi said this: that we all have the same number of hours in the day, and it’s how we choose to use them that matters.

I choose to use mine improving on the futures of those around me.

Congratulations. You’re the president of your career. What’s your next move?

Photo credit Bobster1985

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  • http://www.enduringwanderlust.com Enduring Wanderlust

    Marketing is second only to good content and presentation. It’s a requirement for almost every successful blog.

  • http://www.heinelt.de Hüllen

    This article really motivated me to think about my future plans of my career.
    But it’s not quite clear until know..

  • http://www.heinelt.de Hüllen

    This article really motivated me to think about my future plans of my career.
    But it’s not quite clear until know..

  • Pingback: Could social media cause the next recession? | Intermz.com / the blog

  • http://www.intermz.com/blog Ted Pin

    This post got me thinking–and worrying.

    Our economy crashed because of we created perceived value (stocks, housing) to quench our thirst for more ROI and for more stuff (consumer debt was to be funded by our ever-increasing home values).

    But if, in this “me, now” social media world, we again focus on ourselves so entirely, could we get into a game of building faux personal value as well, just to keep up with the other guy?

    What would it look like if that bubble popped?

    Before 2008, we thought the market would correct economic inefficiencies. We were wrong.

    Can social media correct ours?

    I wrote about it here:
    http://www.intermz.com/blog/2009/01/06/could-social-media-cause-the-next-recession/

    Thanks for the post.

  • http://www.intermz.com/blog Ted Pin

    This post got me thinking–and worrying.

    Our economy crashed because of we created perceived value (stocks, housing) to quench our thirst for more ROI and for more stuff (consumer debt was to be funded by our ever-increasing home values).

    But if, in this “me, now” social media world, we again focus on ourselves so entirely, could we get into a game of building faux personal value as well, just to keep up with the other guy?

    What would it look like if that bubble popped?

    Before 2008, we thought the market would correct economic inefficiencies. We were wrong.

    Can social media correct ours?

    I wrote about it here:
    http://www.intermz.com/blog/2009/01/06/could-social-media-cause-the-next-recession/

    Thanks for the post.

  • http://girlola.wordpress.com Angela Bull

    So timely and so true! You never cease to inspire me.

    I had the same thoughts about loving your career as Jeff Shattuck, so I am excited that you affirmed them and look forward to reading what else you have to say.

    Thanks for the post!

  • http://girlola.wordpress.com Angela Bull

    So timely and so true! You never cease to inspire me.

    I had the same thoughts about loving your career as Jeff Shattuck, so I am excited that you affirmed them and look forward to reading what else you have to say.

    Thanks for the post!

  • http://www.sonnygill.com Sonny Gill

    Biggest thing that stuck to me is investing in yourself. I remember when I first got out of college and the way things were then. You had to have a stellar resume and cover letter (not that you don’t know), but that has expanded ten fold into a stellar portfolio, blog, community, online or offline presence and personality – you’ve gotta show your chops and let potential employers see what you’re made of, aside from some words on a piece of watermarked paper.

    If you can’t take the time to invest in yourself, what makes you think a company will?

  • http://www.sonnygill.com Sonny Gill

    Biggest thing that stuck to me is investing in yourself. I remember when I first got out of college and the way things were then. You had to have a stellar resume and cover letter (not that you don’t know), but that has expanded ten fold into a stellar portfolio, blog, community, online or offline presence and personality – you’ve gotta show your chops and let potential employers see what you’re made of, aside from some words on a piece of watermarked paper.

    If you can’t take the time to invest in yourself, what makes you think a company will?

  • Kate

    Chris, I’ll echo what others said: Excellent post. Like others, I’m a job seeker, and it’s tough out there. Thank you for all the work you put in to these posts.

  • Kate

    Chris, I’ll echo what others said: Excellent post. Like others, I’m a job seeker, and it’s tough out there. Thank you for all the work you put in to these posts.

  • http://haveabyte.com Erik

    Interesting note about being able to “speak plainly” to senior management about technology. It does make a world of difference in many ways. By educating them about technology, you’re likely to be treated better than normal engineers and often become privy to the inner workings of the business at a level most are not. This is possibly worth a blog post in and of itself.

  • http://haveabyte.com Erik

    Interesting note about being able to “speak plainly” to senior management about technology. It does make a world of difference in many ways. By educating them about technology, you’re likely to be treated better than normal engineers and often become privy to the inner workings of the business at a level most are not. This is possibly worth a blog post in and of itself.

  • http://www.edwalker.net/blog Ed Walker

    What a fantastic post, you’re damn right. I’m going to make sure I hit my goals in 2009, or even exceed them! I’ve got some good ideas and I’m going to make sure that I get them on paper, or make them happen.

    @Erik – I agree, that’s part of what I do. I translate all the social media/blog/technology stuff that senior managers hear/watch/read and apply it to what we do or want to do.

  • http://www.edwalker.net/blog Ed Walker

    What a fantastic post, you’re damn right. I’m going to make sure I hit my goals in 2009, or even exceed them! I’ve got some good ideas and I’m going to make sure that I get them on paper, or make them happen.

    @Erik – I agree, that’s part of what I do. I translate all the social media/blog/technology stuff that senior managers hear/watch/read and apply it to what we do or want to do.

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  • http://www.scottfox.com/blog_index.html Scott Fox, E-Commerce Success

    Hi Chris,
    Very nice post.
    We are on the same wavelength once again.
    Just last week on my blog I posted “You’re ALREADY the boss. It’s just up to you to decide if you are going to act like it.”
    Of course, your development of the theme was much more thorough and entertaining!
    Happy new year,
    Scott

  • http://www.scottfox.com/blog_index.html Scott Fox, E-Commerce Success Blog

    Hi Chris,
    Very nice post.
    We are on the same wavelength once again.
    Just last week on my blog I posted “You’re ALREADY the boss. It’s just up to you to decide if you are going to act like it.”
    Of course, your development of the theme was much more thorough and entertaining!
    Happy new year,
    Scott

  • Kyle Roussel

    Very timely Chris.
    I especially relate to the ‘going back to school’ part. I’ve been told that not having at least a bachelor’s degree means that I don’t have any “table stakes” when it comes to getting a job, or having credibility. So I mulled that over and actually had an appointment today at a university about getting back in.

    Am I doing the right thing? One thing you’re right about is that I’ll be taught things that were relevant in a world that no longer exists. Should I go through with 5 years of part-time schooling or ramp up on my own? Only I can answer that for myself, but the differering opinions from folks I respect don’t make it any easier.

    -Kyle

  • Kyle Roussel

    Very timely Chris.
    I especially relate to the ‘going back to school’ part. I’ve been told that not having at least a bachelor’s degree means that I don’t have any “table stakes” when it comes to getting a job, or having credibility. So I mulled that over and actually had an appointment today at a university about getting back in.

    Am I doing the right thing? One thing you’re right about is that I’ll be taught things that were relevant in a world that no longer exists. Should I go through with 5 years of part-time schooling or ramp up on my own? Only I can answer that for myself, but the differering opinions from folks I respect don’t make it any easier.

    -Kyle

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  • Jonathan

    Yes, yes, of course, of course – you have always been responsible for your own situation; you have always been the author of your life. Nothing is different when it comes to career: you are where you are because YOU made it that way.

    That said, let’s play devil’s advocate a bit, shall we? Organizations are made up of people. The success of the organization is a direct reflection of the committed action taken by the people in it. Committed action arises from both rational and emotional commitment.

    When organizational leaders demonstrate that they don’t care a fig for the concerns of their chattel (oops, I mean “associates), people respond in predictable fashion: they disengage. Their productivity drops, and the organization’s ability to achieve its goals diminishes. Many of those people are doing exactly what you advise – and your advice is utterly true and quite smart, by the way – they are working on “brand you” out in the marketplace, looking for greener pastures.

    Organizational leaders must understand that the time to invest in the people who make their organizations run is right now. This isn’t a bleeding-heart, “oh, let’s just take care of everybody” perspective, it’s a business mandate: find the people who really make it work (that doesn’t necessarily mean the people who blow the most sunshine up your skirt, by the way), find out what matters most to them, and help them get it WITHIN the confines of your organization. The best and brightest ALWAYS have options.

    When people see that the leaders in their organizations know them, hear their concerns, respect their points of view, and honor the work that they do, those people’s emotional commitment rises and so does their productivity and profitability. Organizational leaders MUST learn how to cut the fat without damaging muscle, or they will do worse by cutting headcount costs than they would have otherwise.

  • Jonathan

    Yes, yes, of course, of course – you have always been responsible for your own situation; you have always been the author of your life. Nothing is different when it comes to career: you are where you are because YOU made it that way.

    That said, let’s play devil’s advocate a bit, shall we? Organizations are made up of people. The success of the organization is a direct reflection of the committed action taken by the people in it. Committed action arises from both rational and emotional commitment.

    When organizational leaders demonstrate that they don’t care a fig for the concerns of their chattel (oops, I mean “associates), people respond in predictable fashion: they disengage. Their productivity drops, and the organization’s ability to achieve its goals diminishes. Many of those people are doing exactly what you advise – and your advice is utterly true and quite smart, by the way – they are working on “brand you” out in the marketplace, looking for greener pastures.

    Organizational leaders must understand that the time to invest in the people who make their organizations run is right now. This isn’t a bleeding-heart, “oh, let’s just take care of everybody” perspective, it’s a business mandate: find the people who really make it work (that doesn’t necessarily mean the people who blow the most sunshine up your skirt, by the way), find out what matters most to them, and help them get it WITHIN the confines of your organization. The best and brightest ALWAYS have options.

    When people see that the leaders in their organizations know them, hear their concerns, respect their points of view, and honor the work that they do, those people’s emotional commitment rises and so does their productivity and profitability. Organizational leaders MUST learn how to cut the fat without damaging muscle, or they will do worse by cutting headcount costs than they would have otherwise.

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  • http://www.metcalf-associates.com Maureen Metcalf

    I work largely with leaders to transform themselves and their organizations in changing times. I absolutely agree with your recommendations. Here are a few thoughts – consistent with your ideas and I hope a couple of additional ideas:

    1. Be proactive- look around and see what you need to improve to compete in the new – changed environment – how do you differentiate yourself?

    2. New skills can be developed in school if you need to develop some foundation skills and if you will benefit from a recognized credential like MBA or advanced degree preferred for a position. While people with MBAs may not be smarter – we (yes I am one and I teach in an MBA program so that is my bias) recognized that the degree opens some doors so if it helps differentiate you – consider the benefits with the costs of time and $. If you are early in your career – the time to get benefit from it is longer than those later in careers.

    3. Keep current – yes by the time text books are written and class material is developed it could be old or it could be really new – if you are studying with research faculty who are creating the latest research. I teach what I am working on so my students often get the newest research – before it is even published. AND- keep reading – sources like this blog MUST accompany scholarly work – find the balance that works for your field.

    4. Develop your emotional resilience. These are trying times by most measures – if your life is going well just turn on the news. How do you personally find and keep balance? Do you have a good physical activity practice – best if it includes nature – walking the dog outside is great. Do you have a centering and balancing practice like yoga, meditation, or religious faith that you feel supported by? Do you have friends who make you laugh? Do you have a “tribe” that you trust and rely on? We all have tough days and weeks. Having a range of healthy practices will enable us to navigate the difficulty with grace. This is really important if we are leading people and they are looking to us for guidance. Our behavior sets the emotional tone along with the organizational direction. Emotions are contagious – if you do not sneeze on the food of friends – do not let your cranky emotions spill onto their productive day.

    We have some great opportunities to take stock and build capacity now. This can be a great adventure as well as a challenge. Data would suggest that people engaged in their own development are both happier and more successful.

    If you are interested in leadership development as described by Jim Collins in his book Good to Great – specifically Level 5 Leadership, I invite you to check out the following link for additional ideas about how you define the qualities you might want to develop: http://metcalf-associates.blogspot.com/2008/12/what-are-developmental-levels-level-5.html – this is the beginning of a series of posts on leadership levels – all are available on the blog.

    Enjoy the adventure!

  • http://www.metcalf-associates.com Maureen Metcalf

    I work largely with leaders to transform themselves and their organizations in changing times. I absolutely agree with your recommendations. Here are a few thoughts – consistent with your ideas and I hope a couple of additional ideas:

    1. Be proactive- look around and see what you need to improve to compete in the new – changed environment – how do you differentiate yourself?

    2. New skills can be developed in school if you need to develop some foundation skills and if you will benefit from a recognized credential like MBA or advanced degree preferred for a position. While people with MBAs may not be smarter – we (yes I am one and I teach in an MBA program so that is my bias) recognized that the degree opens some doors so if it helps differentiate you – consider the benefits with the costs of time and $. If you are early in your career – the time to get benefit from it is longer than those later in careers.

    3. Keep current – yes by the time text books are written and class material is developed it could be old or it could be really new – if you are studying with research faculty who are creating the latest research. I teach what I am working on so my students often get the newest research – before it is even published. AND- keep reading – sources like this blog MUST accompany scholarly work – find the balance that works for your field.

    4. Develop your emotional resilience. These are trying times by most measures – if your life is going well just turn on the news. How do you personally find and keep balance? Do you have a good physical activity practice – best if it includes nature – walking the dog outside is great. Do you have a centering and balancing practice like yoga, meditation, or religious faith that you feel supported by? Do you have friends who make you laugh? Do you have a “tribe” that you trust and rely on? We all have tough days and weeks. Having a range of healthy practices will enable us to navigate the difficulty with grace. This is really important if we are leading people and they are looking to us for guidance. Our behavior sets the emotional tone along with the organizational direction. Emotions are contagious – if you do not sneeze on the food of friends – do not let your cranky emotions spill onto their productive day.

    We have some great opportunities to take stock and build capacity now. This can be a great adventure as well as a challenge. Data would suggest that people engaged in their own development are both happier and more successful.

    If you are interested in leadership development as described by Jim Collins in his book Good to Great – specifically Level 5 Leadership, I invite you to check out the following link for additional ideas about how you define the qualities you might want to develop: http://metcalf-associates.blogspot.com/2008/12/what-are-developmental-levels-level-5.html – this is the beginning of a series of posts on leadership levels – all are available on the blog.

    Enjoy the adventure!

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  • http://suzemuse.wordpress.com Susan Murphy

    tWhile I agree that going back to school is something that should be very seriously considered, I’m not sure it’s accurate to make a blanket statement that what one can learn in school is not current or relevant.

    Having been a student a few times, and now as a college professor, I’m all too aware that college courses have a reputation for being outdated. However, I think in some cases, that is starting to change.

    I can’t speak for all post-secondary education, but In the School of Media and Design at Algonquin College in Ottawa, where I teach, much is being done to keep on the cutting edge of the industry. This is done by inviting professionals working in the industry to sit on advisory boards, to help structure the curriculum and content to be more timely and relevant. It’s also done by ensuring that the college professors are actively working in their industry, and bringing forth their own real experience for the benefit of their students. As a result I’m happy to be teaching a Web media course this semester that is focusing on social media – teaching students to understand the world of online communication and collaboration and particularly how it applies to business and their own careers.

    Sorry if this sounds defensive – that’s not my intent. I just want to ensure that people know that higher learning CAN be a positive, rewarding and useful experience when approached in the right way.

  • http://suzemuse.wordpress.com Susan Murphy

    tWhile I agree that going back to school is something that should be very seriously considered, I’m not sure it’s accurate to make a blanket statement that what one can learn in school is not current or relevant.

    Having been a student a few times, and now as a college professor, I’m all too aware that college courses have a reputation for being outdated. However, I think in some cases, that is starting to change.

    I can’t speak for all post-secondary education, but In the School of Media and Design at Algonquin College in Ottawa, where I teach, much is being done to keep on the cutting edge of the industry. This is done by inviting professionals working in the industry to sit on advisory boards, to help structure the curriculum and content to be more timely and relevant. It’s also done by ensuring that the college professors are actively working in their industry, and bringing forth their own real experience for the benefit of their students. As a result I’m happy to be teaching a Web media course this semester that is focusing on social media – teaching students to understand the world of online communication and collaboration and particularly how it applies to business and their own careers.

    Sorry if this sounds defensive – that’s not my intent. I just want to ensure that people know that higher learning CAN be a positive, rewarding and useful experience when approached in the right way.

  • http://www.twitter.com/LChamberlain Laura Chamberlain

    Absolutely loooved the wrap-up sentence. Great style finish.

  • http://www.twitter.com/LChamberlain Laura Chamberlain

    Absolutely loooved the wrap-up sentence. Great style finish.

  • http://www.talentbuildersinc.com Barb Giamanco

    Right on! Last year I gave a talk at Verizon titled Who’s Career is it Anyway? I lack patience for people who cry the blues about how their company doesn’t do anything for their career. Of course, I believe they should, but who said they were obligated too? The investment that a company is willing to make in their people will vary, but one thing holds true. It’s up to each individual to manage their own career success.

    Back in my corporate America days, my employers didn’t always pay for the classes I took to improve my communication, management skills, coaching skills, etc. Books are cheap and these days there are so many great FREE webinars on every topic imaginable. Or, read blogs – like this one!

    There just isn’t any excuse. I worked to remain lay-off proof then and now as a business owner. People are buying. We just might have to work a bit harder or pay more attention to the opportunities that at first glance might not seem like they will lead to something. I keep my attitude straight and stay on my priorities and coach others to do the same!

    PS…Chris, I did your 3 words exercise and took my mastermind team through your process. We all love it. My 2009 words are: First, Bridge and Infinite.

    PSS…I’ve always heard SMART goals defined as Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic and Timely. I like your slight variation. Simple goals that lead to something powerfull down the road sounds like a smart (forgive the pun) idea to me.

  • http://www.talentbuildersinc.com Barb Giamanco

    Right on! Last year I gave a talk at Verizon titled Who’s Career is it Anyway? I lack patience for people who cry the blues about how their company doesn’t do anything for their career. Of course, I believe they should, but who said they were obligated too? The investment that a company is willing to make in their people will vary, but one thing holds true. It’s up to each individual to manage their own career success.

    Back in my corporate America days, my employers didn’t always pay for the classes I took to improve my communication, management skills, coaching skills, etc. Books are cheap and these days there are so many great FREE webinars on every topic imaginable. Or, read blogs – like this one!

    There just isn’t any excuse. I worked to remain lay-off proof then and now as a business owner. People are buying. We just might have to work a bit harder or pay more attention to the opportunities that at first glance might not seem like they will lead to something. I keep my attitude straight and stay on my priorities and coach others to do the same!

    PS…Chris, I did your 3 words exercise and took my mastermind team through your process. We all love it. My 2009 words are: First, Bridge and Infinite.

    PSS…I’ve always heard SMART goals defined as Specific, Measurable, Actionable, Realistic and Timely. I like your slight variation. Simple goals that lead to something powerfull down the road sounds like a smart (forgive the pun) idea to me.

  • http://www.strategicblend.com Taylor

    What a great post to help kick off 2009 – thanks Chris!

  • http://www.strategicblend.com Taylor

    What a great post to help kick off 2009 – thanks Chris!

  • http://blog.angelaconnor.com AngelaConnor

    I have watched so many of my friends, and former colleagues fall due to the collapse of newspapers and now local news. Yet so many saw this right with me and never did anything on the personal front to shield themselves or at least prepare themselves for the worst by attaining new skills. I seem to get new news every other day about a layoff or buyout. There is no way I could watch all of that happen and think I’m immune. It’s just not possible. I just posted a status update a few days ago on Facebook that said :”Angela is…working on career security.” Do you know that one of my former colleagues responded saying:”Let me know if you find any.” I mean, come on. You create it yourself, you don’t just find it. i was particularly annoyed at that comment partly because I know he is one of the complainers who said i was “lucky” to have a print, broadcast and web journalism background. That is not luck, I knew that my skilss should be diverse and i still know that. At any rate, my point was, the next time you find yourself spreading gossip about a layoff, don’t. Use that energy to create some career security of your own. This is no joke. I’m glad you wrote this post. I will now step off of the soap box.

  • http://blog.angelaconnor.com/2008/12/29/strategist-or-practitioner/ Angela Connor

    I have watched so many of my friends, and former colleagues fall due to the collapse of newspapers and now local news. Yet so many saw this right with me and never did anything on the personal front to shield themselves or at least prepare themselves for the worst by attaining new skills. I seem to get new news every other day about a layoff or buyout. There is no way I could watch all of that happen and think I’m immune. It’s just not possible. I just posted a status update a few days ago on Facebook that said :”Angela is…working on career security.” Do you know that one of my former colleagues responded saying:”Let me know if you find any.” I mean, come on. You create it yourself, you don’t just find it. i was particularly annoyed at that comment partly because I know he is one of the complainers who said i was “lucky” to have a print, broadcast and web journalism background. That is not luck, I knew that my skilss should be diverse and i still know that. At any rate, my point was, the next time you find yourself spreading gossip about a layoff, don’t. Use that energy to create some career security of your own. This is no joke. I’m glad you wrote this post. I will now step off of the soap box.

  • http://www.twitter.com/CalamityJen Jennifer Milikien

    Great post, Chris. Thanks!

  • http://www.twitter.com/CalamityJen Jennifer Milikien

    Great post, Chris. Thanks!

  • http://mattwilson.tv @MattWilsontv

    Sit in the front row of your life!

  • http://mattwilson.tv @MattWilsontv

    Sit in the front row of your life!

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  • Bonnie Parrish-Kell

    Chris, you’re right about most academic classes – many instructors aren’t as active in their topic. However, most continuing education classes I know are taught by folks who are doing what they are teaching and are pretty darn active in their professions.

    I tell my SEO students right off that this 6-week/18-hour SEO and online marketing class is simply an introduction. They will have to continue reading, testing and discussing search engine marketing PLUS becoming knowledgeable in marketing communications, social media and its correct usage, and other aspects of operating a successful business. It’s exactly what I do. Luckily, I enjoy it!

    Keeping up with changes may be stressful but I find it leads to greater opportunities and more peace of mind.

  • http:/twitter.com/bparrishkell Bonnie Parrish-Kell

    Chris, you’re right about most academic classes – many instructors aren’t as active in their topic. However, most continuing education classes I know are taught by folks who are doing what they are teaching and are pretty darn active in their professions.

    I tell my SEO students right off that this 6-week/18-hour SEO and online marketing class is simply an introduction. They will have to continue reading, testing and discussing search engine marketing PLUS becoming knowledgeable in marketing communications, social media and its correct usage, and other aspects of operating a successful business. It’s exactly what I do. Luckily, I enjoy it!

    Keeping up with changes may be stressful but I find it leads to greater opportunities and more peace of mind.

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