Audience as Currency

Billetes y sombreros

In a recent post, Julien Smith points out that his blog doesn’t have a direct business model, but rather, that it’s a way to build audience for his ideas. He points out that delaying the direct monetization of one’s audience is an important goal. I agree. Further, I want to say that thinking about your audience as its own kind of currency is an important highlight, underscore, and asterisk point. This is social proof, and it’s part of growing trust. And beyond that, it’s a way to get your ideas out in front of many people.

Audience as Currency

I value everyone who comes and reads [chrisbrogan.com]. I’m grateful every time you come and leave a comment or forward it along. I like that you want to share it, to riff on it, to make it your own. That’s what this blog is all about. The goal is to give you ideas that you can do something with. And the goal for me is that you do two things: take something of this for you, and leave thinking that I know something and that you want to continue the relationship. If I’ve hit both, then I win.

Where you become currency is in this kind of third party way. People come and they say, “He has just about 300,000 uniques a month. He has 68,000 RSS subscribers. He’s in the Top 5 of AdAge.” Those are all ways that people look at YOU, my friends and audience, as currency, because they count me as being interesting and valid because of those numbers. Make sense? So in that way, my audience is my currency as people who come to see my site and decide whether they think I’ve got something useful to say see YOU and they equate you as being a value to me.

But Not as Money

It’s important, however, not to look at your audience as your only way to make money. Or rather, maybe it’s important to look at your audience as being made up of community members, peers, competitors, and the occasional buyer. The moment you start thinking of your audience as your customers (only), then you’re running into a problem, because then the only transaction that makes sense in your head is a sale.

The way I handle that hear is that I sell you things I think you might find useful and that might improve your lot in life, like when I sell premium WordPress themes, but that I don’t intend to sell you every single day. Instead, I prefer to give you things that make sense when they come up, and the rest of the time, I’d rather share ideas that will help you grow, which in turn grows your capabilities and your desires to do bigger and more interesting things.

Does that make sense?

For every day that I can praise the work of a C.C. Chapman and a Mark Horvath, I’ve made quite a value off our relationship. It’s not the sale of the various things in my sidebar that keep me in this relationship. Instead, it’s the currency of having a community full of people who matter, people with big ideas, and people who can extend the community into larger places. That’s where I see the value.

There are a few themes and directions in here. Where do you see your audience and its value? How have you been treating them? And what do you make of benefits, if any, to participating here?

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  • Anonymous

    Compelling topic. I see MY audience as individuals who want to learn via humor but who also take ownership of their own actions/feelings/etc., so I always try to respond by telling how things can be achieved but NOT doing it for them (ie, the old adage, give a person a fish and she’ll eat for a day, teach her to fish and she’ll not only become a captain in the Deadliest Catch, she’ll also then compile up her knowledge and build a community around it).

    Funny thing – I first read the title of this post to be

    Audacity As Courage

    instead of

    Audience As Currency.

    Definitely sparked my interest…
    The benefits to participating here? Getting known as part of the social media community, sharing my skills when possible, and seeing just what’s on the cutting edge of this industry.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Oooh, I like that, too. Thanks for sharing that perspective.

  • http://biggsuccess.com georgekrueger

    I remember a great speaker at SOBCon in 2008. He said: “Be careful not to let commerce interfere with your community.” It was my main takeaway from the conference that year. Commerce should enable your community, not interfere with it. Now if I could only remember who that speaker was … oh, yeah – Chris Brogan :)

  • http://biggsuccess.com georgekrueger

    I remember a great speaker at SOBCon in 2008. He said: “Be careful not to let commerce interfere with your community.” It was my main takeaway from the conference that year. Commerce should enable your community, not interfere with it. Now if I could only remember who that speaker was … oh, yeah – Chris Brogan :)

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Quite so, amigo. I hope you’re well. : )

  • http://www.mohanarun.com Mohan Arun L

    If you concentrate on building community, usage and engagement, you can always figure out a way to get monetary returns later. (think twitter) Of course, not everyone has access to the funds required to keep yourself afloat and to build the tools for community outreach while you try to build audience. I would say it is more a matter of luck – possessing the right connections is one of the first and foremost element of luck.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s very true. We have to eat. : )

  • http://twitter.com/ThingsBright Elizabeth Drouillard

    I like what you said about “community members, peers, competitors, and the occasional buyer.” I mostly think about my audience as friends and connectors. I want to build enough of a bridge with my ideas that people can see how to translate and build that bridge in their own circles.

  • http://twitter.com/ThingsBright Elizabeth Drouillard

    I like what you said about “community members, peers, competitors, and the occasional buyer.” I mostly think about my audience as friends and connectors. I want to build enough of a bridge with my ideas that people can see how to translate and build that bridge in their own circles.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Bridges are great, better when you have destinations. : )

  • http://twitter.com/ThingsBright Elizabeth Drouillard

    I like what you said about “community members, peers, competitors, and the occasional buyer.” I mostly think about my audience as friends and connectors. I want to build enough of a bridge with my ideas that people can see how to translate and build that bridge in their own circles.

  • http://www.yuzzi.com Rick Yuzzi

    Never thought of it that way. If you are marketing yourself, or marketing your business, the audience is a form of currency, but not an end in itself. If it is social marketing, it’s as much about building relationships and providing value to that audience, and receiving value back from that relationship as a result.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Exactly so, Rick. What do you think now that you’ve chewed on it a bit?

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Exactly so, Rick. What do you think now that you’ve chewed on it a bit?

  • http://www.yuzzi.com Rick Yuzzi

    Never thought of it that way. If you are marketing yourself, or marketing your business, the audience is a form of currency, but not an end in itself. If it is social marketing, it’s as much about building relationships and providing value to that audience, and receiving value back from that relationship as a result.

  • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

    I think I can now have an excuse for having no business model in my blog. I think that most people who run a blog focus too much on getting business out of it. Yesterday while reading the “Unmarketing” book I found a line that Scott wrote which I can identify with this.

    “Making money isn’t a career. It’s the result of good business. There is a huge difference between a result and the cause of the result.”~Scott Stratten

    If most bloggers followed your example (sharing great content with their honest opinion) they would realize that eventually people who would see the value will followers, collaborators, and if you are lucky enough you will gain clients/customers.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Career. It’s a word that’s weird in my mouth these days.

      • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

        That is why I quoted Scott. LOL :) (just kidding) I had not seeing that way but I agree with you.

        Always marveled on how you can compress a deep message in a few words.

        • http://www.nathanmeffert.com Nathan Meffert

          It’s because he spends so much time on Twitter! ;) Which, as we all know, is like deep message in a few words ninja camp!

          • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

            That explainst it :). Nathan have a great week!

          • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

            That explainst it :). Nathan have a great week!

      • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

        That is why I quoted Scott. LOL :) (just kidding) I had not seeing that way but I agree with you.

        Always marveled on how you can compress a deep message in a few words.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Career. It’s a word that’s weird in my mouth these days.

    • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

      Raul

      This is why so many bloggers fail. They are chasing the numbers and dollars. Chasing the money here is Vegas is a sure fire way to give it all to the dealer. Blogging is work do not get me wrong as there is time involved but at the same time you are sharing your thoughts and knowledge with people who really want to learn and hear it. This does not happen overnight but yet we see too many get rich quick schemes that it dulls the intensity of doing it right and growing gradually.

      • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

        I just saw a video on someone offering a Social Media Certification for Latinos (what surprised me was the Latinos part).

        I think your Vegas analogy goes great with the real message. I think anywhere you search for shortcuts and fast cash you end up in the wrong place.

        Thanks for always communicating with me :).

        • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

          Raul

          That is an interesting niche they are developing. Though people are very close to their heritage and in many ways there is a trust level that is developed on face value. I find it very interesting indeed as you will get a kick out of this. I am italian and back east, people know that but here in the southwest of Las Vegas, everyone thinks I am latino. I crack up when I get mail in spanish as I cannot read it. I am sure the latino community would love to have me but soon enough they would find out that I am italian and drop me. Sorry, I digressed.

          There are some times where shortcuts do work out but those are not the norm. Work hard, treat people with respect and kindness and not only work hard, work smart.

          Please, not thanks needed, communication goes both ways my friend.

  • http://raulcolon.net Raul Colon

    I think I can now have an excuse for having no business model in my blog. I think that most people who run a blog focus too much on getting business out of it. Yesterday while reading the “Unmarketing” book I found a line that Scott wrote which I can identify with this.

    “Making money isn’t a career. It’s the result of good business. There is a huge difference between a result and the cause of the result.”~Scott Stratten

    If most bloggers followed your example (sharing great content with their honest opinion) they would realize that eventually people who would see the value will followers, collaborators, and if you are lucky enough you will gain clients/customers.

  • http://www.yourcareerbydesign.com Mary Rosenbaum

    Building community, building relationships, building trust, and building your tribe – makes life a lot better and definitely more interesting. Also it creates a sense of responsibility to your followers to continue providing them with valuable content and not just rest on your laurels. And you do a great job of that. Thanks for sharing your wisdom.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I quite agree. A dollar from you today isn’t nearly as valuable as a relationship with you for years.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I quite agree. A dollar from you today isn’t nearly as valuable as a relationship with you for years.

  • http://www.mikepedersen.com/stop-procrastination-to-succeed-in-business/ Mike Pedersen

    I like that phrase “audience as currency” as many, if not most blogs do not make any money, and yet the bloggers are working hard to create valuable content. The biggest frustration for most in the blogging world is not feeling appreciated (comment luv). So if your audience does show up AND writes a valuable comment, it’s definitely (or nearly) equal to currency.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s exactly the thought. Not that you’re looking for CASH from people, but that there’s a value to having an audience.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s exactly the thought. Not that you’re looking for CASH from people, but that there’s a value to having an audience.

  • http://twitter.com/caroljsroth Carol Roth

    Given my financial background, I have to give my two cents (lame pun intended). The way I think of a currency is something that can be exchanged for something else. That leads to a one-time transaction, which is not what you want to be building.

    I tend to think of audience as more of an asset. You can leverage an asset and if it is the right type of asset (and cared for properly), it’s value can increase or “appreciate” over time. If it is not cared for it’s value will depreciate.

    You can leverage the asset of an audience in many ways. You can sell to an audience (monetary benefit), or you can leverae their influence to talk about you, build your brand and attract more fans, making your audience more valuable. The key it to make it a win-win for both parties- you have to be in service of your audience to create an audience of value.

    And great taste on C.C. Chapman and Mark Horvath- two of my favorite guys too :)

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I think you’re right. Much better word for it. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I think you’re right. Much better word for it. : )

      • http://www.kherize5.com Suzanne Vara

        Chris

        I agree with Carol (whom I was quite fortunate to meet at BWE when I sat in on her panel with Terry Starbucker and Liz Strauss thanks to Joel (franchise king; who is a great guy too!) here on asset while at the same time I also see the currency side. The asset is your own audience but the currency is the pay it forward type of currency when you bring your audience together and introduce them to one another.

        I was just mentioning to Nathan Meffert (who I met here thank you very much =-) how here or on many blogs we see the same people and so many times we do not speak to one another. They all speak to the author. Great but IRL if we all met at the same place we would talk to one another. How do we transfer that to online? Nathan and I are working on it and your insight is always welcomed. Don’t get me wrong, your audience loves you, I love you but at the same time, to really build a community there is expansion and through this blog, we have a common denominator conversation starter already.

        A community is more than growing your own, it is growing everyone’s by introducing people to people we know that we feel would benefit from the introduction. We seem to miss that part and also the real conversation that is so talked about in SM. So many thoughts, ideas, etc are shared when we talk to one another as well as the author in the comments. I know I get quite chatty and enthusiastic when talking about advertising and marketing (or football) and have really enjoyed the last few months of really meeting and talking with people online. Raul Colon, Jason Sokol, Margie, Joel, Nathan Meffert, Gabriele Maidecchi (and not just because he lives in Tuscany and has a Vespa) – these people as well as you, Tom, DJ, etc are assets to me as you make my life better and teach me constantly. But you are also currency as I can pay it forward and introduce you all to people that would become assets to you. Hope that makes sense.

        @SuzanneVara

  • http://twitter.com/DaveBenjamin David Benjamin

    What I find fascinating is that the people who most need to read this blog probably won’t. They view the concept of audience, social networking, and sharing great content as a waste of time. When you’re really good at what you do, you don’t have to sell. People will instinctively seek you and your products or services out.

    You can’t retire off of one sale, but developing a raving fan base willing to sing your praises on a daily basis…that’s the type of audience we’re all looking for. Thanks for always sharing your perspective and observations.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      You’ll take the message and go where people are, if that makes sense. : )

  • http://matthewm.org Matt Medeiros

    I love the creative headlines you come up with – great stuff!

    You’re dead on with the value of an audience, community or following. And in today’s Social Network-centric world, your blog is the flagship of – say it with me – being social!

    If you don’t realize that your audience, customers or fans are valuable – you may as well give up. If you don’t feel like standing on the stage that is social media, don’t worry, your competitor will.

    David Benjamin posts below, the people that should be reading this blog are not. But that’s OK David, it’s people like us through Chris’s mentoring that will spread the word!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Quite true, Matt. People aren’t here that should be, but you’ll find them. : )

  • David Siteman Garland

    Chris – This reminds me of the interview that we did together when we discussed the business model triangle which I think is massively critical.

    For example, here is one of your triangles:

    1. Create great free content for small biz owners, entrepreneurs and forward-thinking marketers
    2. Sell to big corporations who hire New Media Labs, you, etc.
    3. Sure, there are things readers can buy as well: affiliate links, etc, but is relatively rare for a sales push.

    This is my triangle:

    1. Create awesome interviews and web shows for forward-thinkers, creative people, entrepreneurs, small biz owners and forward-thinking marketers. Shows are free to consume, share, etc.
    2. Sell to people who want to reach said audience via sponsorships/advertising/partnerships.
    3. Rarely sell direct to community with the exception being my upcoming book.

    Only way to explain it in few words: Umm, it just works.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’d be right. It’s the same thing stated slightly differently.

  • http://TheChrisVossShow.com Chris Voss

    Awesome post, Chris. I started laughing when I saw the currency hats picture. You bring up a great point so many people forget that its not about the money. Basic capitalism, is that if you GIVE a great product or service that improves their quality of life, people will usually PAY you for it. “If you build it, they will come.” Focus on peoples needs first, helping them improve their lives and out of that you can have a product or service. If you also GIVE more than your competitors, you likely may get more business. I hear entrepreneurs say, “I want to do something that makes a lot of money.” They are too focused on the wrong end of it. Some Salespeople will say “I sell ‘X’ product or service. They dont, super salespeople know they sell improvements to customers lives and they believe in that.

    Thanks Chris!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that, sir.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that, sir.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      True that, sir.

  • http://TheChrisVossShow.com Chris Voss

    Awesome post, Chris. I started laughing when I saw the currency hats picture. You bring up a great point so many people forget that its not about the money. Basic capitalism, is that if you GIVE a great product or service that improves their quality of life, people will usually PAY you for it. “If you build it, they will come.” Focus on peoples needs first, helping them improve their lives and out of that you can have a product or service. If you also GIVE more than your competitors, you likely may get more business. I hear entrepreneurs say, “I want to do something that makes a lot of money.” They are too focused on the wrong end of it. Some Salespeople will say “I sell ‘X’ product or service. They dont, super salespeople know they sell improvements to customers lives and they believe in that.

    Thanks Chris!

  • http://www.fanagement.com Greg Bates

    Chris – I wrote a post the other day over on my blog that was inspired by your post on ‘The Basics’, where I talk about how musicians should look at their relationships with fans, bloggers, other bands, sponsors, etc. as distribution points for their content… And how the stronger those relationships become, the more distribution your content enjoys.

    I think this post sort of sums up the main idea of why it works better to think this way. Thanks!

    Greg

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I’m happy about that, Greg. Glad that we can riff off each other.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I’m happy about that, Greg. Glad that we can riff off each other.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I’m happy about that, Greg. Glad that we can riff off each other.

  • http://www.fanagement.com Greg Bates

    Chris – I wrote a post the other day over on my blog that was inspired by your post on ‘The Basics’, where I talk about how musicians should look at their relationships with fans, bloggers, other bands, sponsors, etc. as distribution points for their content… And how the stronger those relationships become, the more distribution your content enjoys.

    I think this post sort of sums up the main idea of why it works better to think this way. Thanks!

    Greg

  • http://twitter.com/EvolutionCBL Evolution Career Bus

    I see my audience not as a currency but as value that enriches who I am and in turn I hope to enrich who they are. If the by-product is that they see value in doing business with me I am grateful. However, it is not the underlying cause to have them in the audience.
    I see the audience as a resource where there can be an exchange of knowledge between us. We each learn from each other. We help each other to grow and prosper in many ways.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s certainly also true, a value.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s certainly also true, a value.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s certainly also true, a value.

  • http://twitter.com/judyrey Judy Rey Wasserman

    As ever, another great post, Chris.
    This one is near and now dear to a new art series I am working on that deals with worth and value, and money. In my own unique and weird way, you inspired me to imagine (i.e. see) new ways to use the money I am creating images of that I can and will combine to make even more images. Although somewhere on a blog, I snuck in an image of one of the USA bills (most use the 10 Commandments for the strokes).
    As an artist, my many new social media connections add value to my life. You, Chris, have added value into my life with your understandings of social media, which I basically follow.
    In today’s world perceived value and worth trumps real value and worth — in the USA this way of thinking got a huge boost when America left the gold standard.
    Social Media has proven it especially values people as one of its best uses has been in fund-raising for causes, such as helping the people of Haiti.
    So much to think about in the ides of this post. Thanks.
    Judy Rey Wasserman

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I love it, Judy. I hope to see the results when you’re closer to showing them off. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I love it, Judy. I hope to see the results when you’re closer to showing them off. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I love it, Judy. I hope to see the results when you’re closer to showing them off. : )

  • Catherine

    I agree this is how I want to be treated and how I want to treat my customers. Love your graphics on this post!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Thanks! I thought they were fun. : )

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Thanks! I thought they were fun. : )

  • Rex Williams

    Great stuff Chris, as always.

    I’ve noticed that the foundation to all this is great thinking and writing. You have to actually produce something in order to build an audience.

    So you are a thinker and writer first, then you are a community builder, strengthening relationships with those who show up to consume your content. But you must have content first.

    Thanks for being an example and showing me how to crank out the content.

  • http://twitter.com/meganberry Megan Berry

    Hey Chris,

    Interesting post! It’s something we’ve been thinking of a lot over here at Klout. Companies need to think about the network value of their customers/audience/fans in addition to their value as customers. If I only buy one thing but then introduce all my friends to a product/brand than I am as valuable or more valuable than a customer who buys often but doesn’t share.

  • http://www.azreg.com Alex Casteel

    Thanks Chris. As I’ve begun blogging I’ve had to learn the hard way that the audience is currency and they’re not looking for a hard sell. It’s caused me to have to give something without any expectation of getting anything in return (immediately, anyway). As I grow in my “blogging maturity” however, I’ve found that I’m enjoying it more and more people are starting to catch on. As always, I appreciate your insight.

  • http://www.SuccessNexus.com/blog/ Ankesh Kothari

    Thanks Chris. I agree with almost everything in this post. Except “delaying the direct monetization of one’s audience is an important goal. I agree.”

    Delaying monetization should not be a goal. Thinking of your audience first and selling only those things that help them is a good goal. But not selling at all to build a bigger audience – I’m sorry but thats not how things work.

    Two reasons:

    1. Research shows that people feel more confident about the candidate’s ability they voted for – after they voted for him. Not before. But after. Your audience likes you and trusts you more after they pay you.

    And as long as you don’t abuse that trust by not delivering (and over delivering) what you promise – its a win for everyone involved.

    And the more your audience trusts you, the more they’ll promote you.

    2. The earlier you start monetizing, the earlier you can create an advertising budget. And the more readers you can attract and help. Thats how all those old direct marketing and TV infomercial companies grew – they invested all the profits from their first few products into further advertising.

    More bloggers should do this too. Start monetizing as early as you can. And then use the funds to promote your blog and reach and help more people.

  • http://twitter.com/Larryphoto Larry Lourcey

    It is a funny thing – the numbers game associated with social media. The thing that is so hard to calculate is how much of an audience do you really have? Since all the visitors have varying degrees of interest in your site – how do you calculate the total value?

    I kind of get tired-head trying to figure it out…
    @Larryphoto

  • http://mydarabell.com/ Dara Bell

    Think the garphics are fun. I see the delaying of monetization as worthwhile. Too many people are trying to get on too fast. The relationship factor is lost. I made a commitment three years to concentrate on relationships. It was the best promise to myself I ever made.

    I feel audince as currency can be seen with the problems Digg is experiencing. To me where content curation will flourish is when it meets community management.

  • http://twitter.com/monk51295 monika hardy

    nice Chris. thank you.

    i also like transparency as currency.

  • Cody

    A friend suggested you Chris to help in my discovery social media. Social media is new to me and i know that i cannot do this alone. So i am thankful he told me about you. Thanks

  • http://www.blackfridayplanet.com/ William Hushburn

    I like the image that you posted here.

  • http://www.blackfridayplanet.com/ William Hushburn

    Thanks for this wonderful information.

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  • http://www.mazakaro.com Rahul @ MazaKaro

    very helpful informations !!! i will have to read this again !! :)))))

  • http://connectedcomedy.com Josh @ Connected Comedy

    Good points, but don’t you also think that sometimes there’s a danger of people going to far the other direction and just building an audience for audience’s sake?

    At Blogworld recently, I saw somebody (I forget who) talking about the importance of building “an audience with intent to take action” as opposed to just an audience and I thought that was a good thing to remember.

  • http://twitter.com/dorieclark Dorie Clark

    Chris, fascinating topic. I agree completely that business people who want to position themselves as “trusted advisors” can’t afford to look like peddlers, and need to offer real, sustained value without going overboard on the pitching. It’s also critical to avoid the problem of blogging endlessly without a path in mind to make money – not necessarily from the site directly, but perhaps (as you and Julien mention) from consulting/speaking/book sales that get a boost from online audience and credibility. For the blogging relationship to be a win-win (for the author and the reader), there has to be a monetization strategy in place, even if it’s long term, because the alternative is unsustainable.

  • http://twitter.com/dorieclark Dorie Clark

    Chris, fascinating topic. I agree completely that business people who want to position themselves as “trusted advisors” can’t afford to look like peddlers, and need to offer real, sustained value without going overboard on the pitching. It’s also critical to avoid the problem of blogging endlessly without a path in mind to make money – not necessarily from the site directly, but perhaps (as you and Julien mention) from consulting/speaking/book sales that get a boost from online audience and credibility. For the blogging relationship to be a win-win (for the author and the reader), there has to be a monetization strategy in place, even if it’s long term, because the alternative is unsustainable.

  • http://tevg2.blogspot.com/ Steve

    Just watch out for those take my advise and don’t think twice, then me and your money will go someplace sunny types.

  • http://tevg2.blogspot.com/ Steve

    Just watch out for those take my advise and don’t think twice, then me and your money will go someplace sunny types.

  • http://www.flashxml.net/ flash menu

    I think most of the people make that mistake, they always see people as their customers and even I think that if this is the case then they can’t gain that much profit.

  • http://www.flashxml.net/ flash menu

    I think most of the people make that mistake, they always see people as their customers and even I think that if this is the case then they can’t gain that much profit.

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