Professional Speaking Tips- Get Started

Chris Brogan

You want to get on stage and speak professionally. You’ve done some time in speaking at free events and you’ve heard really good feedback. But you’re wondering how to get from free to fee, and you’re looking to build awareness and make some money from your efforts. Here’s what I know.

Set Your Stage

I already shared with you ideas on how to build your stage for public speaking. Consider that the pre-work to this. If you haven’t done what I outline in that post, don’t read this one yet. Bookmark it for later, work on the other stuff, and go from there.

Make a Speaking Brief

Open up your writing software of choice and write about your abilities as a speaker. Here’s what this should contain:

  • A good picture of you. A RECENT good picture of you.
  • An opening paragraph that states what your best topics are, and what you represent as a speaker.
  • Talk about your background. People want to identify with your experience.
  • A paragraph outlining your current level of speaking engagements. Don’t exaggerate. If you’re not keynoting yet, then don’t say you are. Show your current best speech first, then work back from that.
  • References or testimonials. These help a lot.
  • Links to videos of your speeches. The best videos you can present will go a long way towards helping them visualize your work.
  • Any restrictions. If you’re not flying to Europe right now, be clear on that.
  • Contact information. People need to know how to engage with you. Give them as many ways possible.

This document should be no more than two pages. Many people say one page is plenty. And you’ll note that we omitted your fees. That’s something best handled in the conversation.

Where to Find Clients

This depends on your industry, on what you’re talking about, on who you know. If you read the “set a stage” article mentioned above, I dip into it a bit. My best clients find me. I am doing some work with a few speaker’s bureaus, with varied results. After a talk with Tim Sanders, I’ll work a bit more with speaker’s bureaus in 2011, but I’ll say that 90% or more of my speeches came from my own efforts to find them. How did I find them? Blog posts, videos, and word of mouth.

I could write a book on just prospecting for speaking gigs, but I won’t do that here. This post is already long.

Money talk. Fees. Where everyone gets antsy.

The difference between most speakers and professional speakers is that professional speakers charge a fee. We don’t always charge a fee. For instance, when I attend a PodCamp or #140Conf or whatnot, I don’t charge, because it’s a different kind of venue. However, I also have to limit the number of those kinds of speeches I can give in a year, as I’ve got three businesses to run, and flying around to speak for free doesn’t fit that model.

When I first spoke for money, I charged $2500. I jumped up and down when they said yes. Within a year, my standard fee raised to $10,000. Until the end of 2010, my fee is $22,000. In 2011, it goes up to $25,000.

What’s changed?

Over the years, I’ve grown in my ability. Over the years, my credentials have improved (New York Times bestselling book, consulting with several Fortune 100 companies, more experience in my field). My demand has changed, as well (at least in the short term). Also, because I give a customized experience each time, I’m not afraid to charge what I do, because I know that I’ll deliver as much value back to my audience as humanly possible.

But none of this helps you. It just gives you a sense of where I’m coming from. How much should you charge?

The going rate for speeches from marketing types is somewhere between $5,000 and $10,000 (US Dollars), with there being some who make over that based on other details in their background. It’s reasonable to accept anywhere around $3,000 and still be in the ballpark. Note that I said “marketing types.”

Your industry also determines what people pay. Your audience determines what people pay. What people will be able to do with your information determines what people pay. For instance, when I spoke to a really big utility company and their audience a few months back, I knew that my job was to make some sense of all this social media stuff to a room full of people who had heard of Facebook, but who were asking me whether this was something their multi-million dollar companies should be doing, and how. That information has value to them, and I could certainly justify my fee for the experience. If you’re telling a bunch of librarians how to empower their communities with social media, they’re not as likely to make as much financial impact with the information, so they’ll be less likely to pay.

Does this pricing information help? Do you get where it all comes from?

To Negotiate or Not to Negotiate

My speaking fee is my fee. I don’t change the number. I do, however, give people multi-day discounts, so that if someone’s buying two consecutive days of my time, that costs them less. And I’ve bartered once with an organization that had something of value to me (so that I took some of my fee in something other than cash). Beyond that, I don’t negotiate. The reason isn’t that I think that I’m amazing and above such things. The reason is that my price is my price. I’ve got lots of friends who can deliver similar data and who charge less. If someone doesn’t want to pay me, that’s perfectly fine. I refer them to my friends.

You can decide to do this differently. It’s perfectly fine. I’m just sharing my ideas with you on how I do it.

Your First Professional Gig

I’ve covered the set-up stuff, but let’s talk about what you do once you land such an event. First, be aware that the person who hires you will want to do something with media (an interview or the like) to get more value out of your participation in their event. Do this. It’s always useful.

There will be a conference call. People want to know what you’re going to talk about. That’s perfect. The best way for you to use this time, however, is to grill them about their audience, about the current industry fears and hopes, about what else will be weighing on their mind while they’re hearing your talk. That way, you’ll be a lot closer to what the people in that audience are thinking about, versus just wandering in to give your talk. The more you can learn on that call, the better. Don’t skimp on the questions.

Before you present, do as much research as you can on the organization and/or the potential attendees for the event. Do some blog searches, and read what people are saying in that space. Find some of the bigger companies who will be in attendance, and see who you can find of them on the social web. See what they talk about day to day. Find them where they are and get to know more about them. Use this in your presentation, as much as you can. The more you can speak from their perspective and in their language, the better you’ll do.

Practice. I know this sounds stupid to mention, but if you’re making the jump to pro, making mistakes is a quick path back down to the freebies. Do what you can to deliver a crisp, flawless presentation, where you seem confident (but not arrogant).

Secret Tips

Be ready to switch from your slides to off-the-cuff. There are 100 reasons why this might be useful. One: the projector dies. Two: the audience is obviously way off base from where you thought they’d be. Three: you’ve been asked a question up front that isn’t covered in the deck. Four: news that morning changes the tenor of what you’re to present. Once you give a presentation from your own head, with a whole lot more relevance to the audience in front of you, you’ll have won major points.

Make sure the presentation is about them. It’s not you. It’s not you bragging. It’s not you selling. There should be a spot where you tell people a bit about you, your bio, where you’re coming from, but that’s just so they can understand what’s in it for them, and why they should work with you.

Mingle as much as possible. Before and after your speech, stick around and get to know people. I’ve found, time after time, that people respect this a great deal. The more you can talk with others, the more they’ll remember you, and ally with you. Note how much better it is to do this before your speech, because then you’ll have allies in the audience. It’s always VERY important to have allies before a speech, so that if you get nervous, you know where to glance for some support.

Humor helps. I’ll save this for a piece I’m writing for Entrepreneur magazine, but note that if you can be a little bit funny, it goes a long way. I’m practicing this more and more.

If You Have Questions

I’m working on a presentation for Human Business Works on how to give professional presentations. If you like this post, and the previous post on setting the stage, I’m going to pull out all the stops on my presentation. To be in the know on when that presentation webinar airs, get my free newsletter. I’ll be sure to announce it so you can participate.

What else can I do to help? What do you need to know? How can I empower your efforts as a professional speaker?

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  • http://terryjaymes.com Terry Jaymes

    God I wish my damn radio show would end so I can read all this. Can you tell I’m looking to move on?

  • http://terryjaymes.com Terry Jaymes

    God I wish my damn radio show would end so I can read all this. Can you tell I’m looking to move on?

  • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

    Chris..these were excellent..I will be implementing these steps in some of my next speaking engagements…

    “Black Seo Guy “Signing Off”

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Wait. Now you’re the black SEO guy? Well shit. When did this happen?

      • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

        LOL..Chris I just thought it was about time to brand myself, and start to push my seo company. What you think..I value your opinion..Good or bad

      • http://trafficcoleman.com/blog/official-black-seo-guy/ Black Seo Guy

        LOL..Chris I just thought it was about time to brand myself, and start to push my seo company. What you think..I value your opinion..Good or bad

  • http://www.cincyrecruiter.com/ Jennifer McClure

    Thanks so much for sharing this information Chris. I’m always impressed and amazed at your transparency with sharing fee information and how you go about your business. It’s a wonderful example of being good at what you do and not only not worrying about how others do it, but being willing to help them get better.

    As someone who has been making the progression from speaking for free to speaking professionally, I really appreciate this insight into how you do it. Thanks again!

  • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

    I’m not allowed to read this because I haven’t done my homework yet, but I would love to hear a story about your first speaking engagement. I was able to do my first ever this past April, and I’d love to do more of it. I was an NFL star in my younger days, you know.

    That’s National Forensics League.

    • Diane

      If memory serves me correctly, he was 10. There was a gap in the program and he stepped in to fill the void. He had great stage presence and held the audience’s attention. Everything went well until some of his jokes became a little too adult. I will be interested to hear what Chris has to say.

      • http://www.margieclayman.com Marjorie Clayman

        haha, Diane, you’re awesome :D

      • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

        That’s my mom. : )

  • Dave

    Hey Chris – Thanks for the information. The whole world of professional speaking has always interested me. I speak in front of people every week (I am a Pastor) but have not found my “niche” to transition to the business world. I am working on it and your posts are a great help!

  • Dave

    Hey Chris – Thanks for the information. The whole world of professional speaking has always interested me. I speak in front of people every week (I am a Pastor) but have not found my “niche” to transition to the business world. I am working on it and your posts are a great help!

  • http://www.youintegrate.com Kneale Mann

    Thanks Chris! I gained a whole new appreciation for doing paid presentations lately.

    If anyone reading this thinks this is easy stuff, think long and hard again. This is a lot of work, research, more work and TONS of practice. Doing more presentations and workshops has reminded me what it was like when I first started speaking on the radio – I was petrified. But over time and a lot of practice, I started not to suck. Skip any one of Chris’ steps and you will find out the hard way you won’t do that next time.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      By charging, I work harder than I ever did when I worked for free. : )

  • http://damangmedia.com/ Matt Clark

    Thanks for sharing, this are some great tips. One question, in your post “build your stage for public speaking” you mention doing free engagements to practice. What tips do you have for finding these free events to get you going? Is it a good idea to put your own events together? Any tips you can offer are always appreciated.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      You can check with upcoming.org, meetup.com, and search Twitter for event hashtags. Make sense?

      • http://damangmedia.com/ Matt Clark

        Hey that is a great idea, thanks!

  • http://www.accuconference.com Maranda Gibson

    Thanks for the tips Chris. There is definitely a learning curve when it gets down to the movement from “free speaking engagements” to asking for a payment for their presentations. The research is most important because not only do you want to know who you’re talking to, but you want to be able to tailor your presentation to their needs. Knowing your audience will help you figure out why they would want to pay you to speak, so you can deliver. Great stuff!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Thanks for this, Maranda. I appreciate your point about tailoring.

  • http://www.accuconference.com Maranda Gibson

    Thanks for the tips Chris. There is definitely a learning curve when it gets down to the movement from “free speaking engagements” to asking for a payment for their presentations. The research is most important because not only do you want to know who you’re talking to, but you want to be able to tailor your presentation to their needs. Knowing your audience will help you figure out why they would want to pay you to speak, so you can deliver. Great stuff!

  • Angryjuliemonday

    These are great tips. I just spoke on Saturday at a conference. I did not use slides this time, and I spoke from personal experience rather than a “teaching” standpoint.

  • http://twitter.com/bizauthor Stephanie Chandler

    Love this post. I do a lot of speaking as well and one tip that I’d like to add: always provide a hand-out for the audience. I want to make sure that audience members know how to contact me after the fact so I provide meaty content on company letterhead. thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/bizauthor Stephanie Chandler

    Love this post. I do a lot of speaking as well and one tip that I’d like to add: always provide a hand-out for the audience. I want to make sure that audience members know how to contact me after the fact so I provide meaty content on company letterhead. thanks!

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      That’s a beautiful thing. : )

  • Melissa

    Wow, thank you so much for sharing all this information!! This is great stuff and eye opening for me! I can’t even believe the timing of you publishing this post and what’s been happening with me these past couple of weeks.

    I do have a couple of questions but they’re more about being a spokesperson (which can ultimately lead to public speaking): I do all the TV interviews & morning show segments for a company I once worked at full time as Dir of Mar-Com, therefore didn’t charge, but have since left that company but still do their TV stuff (I really LOVE doing TV). I have almost 2 hours’ worth of Live TV experience (in 5 minute increments, which is the typical length of the segments I do) and would like to approach other companies to hire me to be either their company or product spokesperson. I have one ‘hot’ lead with a company launching a new product in Q1 of 2011. In the meantime, I’m still doing TV for the other place (have one gig this week and another in Dec). I have to get back to them on how much I will charge in 2011. That company is struggling a lot financially but every time I get them TV gigs, it gives them a nice revenue boost (TV appearances help bring in about 6-10k per gig). I have about 8 hours of prep time. I dig up some leads for them to sell to as well. I write about the gigs in my SM communities and on the company’s SM communities for them. They pay for travel and expenses. I thought that $800-$1,000 would be ok, but when I saw your numbers, it made me pause. I don’t want to scare this client away if I ask for +$2,000… Charging for my services is a new thing for them and for me and I want to do this right… Any insights you could offer would be great! If you can’t, it’s ok. I’ll totally understand.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      $2000 would be reasonable if you’re delivering something that they normally can’t or don’t choose to do. Remember that they have to take someone out of the main business, get away from doing what they’re paid to do, and take them out of the system for long enough to do the shoot. $2000 is a pretty good rate for keeping someone at their desk while you do their spot for them, don’t you think?

      • Melissa

        Hmm, I think so too. I didn’t think of it that way… and I am *totally* “delivering something that they normally can’t and don’t choose to do” (boy you have no idea how true that statement is!) but knowing how they are, and knowing the financial problems they’re having, there is still the possibility that they might decided to take this on again when faced with my rate. I can only hope that they’ll do a due diligence about the going rates for such work and come to the same conclusion… but it’s a crapshoot… One I’m willing to risk.

        Thank you Chris! Your input means a lot to me!

  • http://thesocialjoint.com/ Lucretia M Pruitt

    Thanks once again for putting the real deal out here. You sharing this will mean a lot of things to so many wondering about this.

    I’m really looking forward to seeing more from you (like the humor piece) wherever you publish it.

    As a totally unsolicited and unaffiliated thing? Nancy Duarte’s latest book “resonate” is the most amazing thing I’ve ever read about the creation of a great speech or presentation. Have you had time to see it?

    I know I’ll be referring back to this post a lot myself, thanks for taking the time not only to write it, but to do the legwork to figure it out so that those of us wandering around behind you have a clearer idea of where the path goes.

    L

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I love Nancy’s book. We just talked about it yesterday during “office hours.” : )

  • Anonymous

    Chris-

    This is a topic that is near and dear to my heart. As a professional speaker, who has earned a living at this full-time for nearly two years, I think you have good points.

    A couple of things I would like to add:

    1. Do not build your speaking business based on looking at those who are famous (Chris Brogan included). With fame comes speaking opportunities. If you are not famous, you can still get paid, and paid well…. but you have to do things a little different.

    2. Professional speaking is a profession. Honor this part of your career the way a doctor or lawyer honors their profession. While you do not need a specific degree, you should still look at the act of giving a speech as more than just taking the stage and winging it. You would not want your doctor or lawyer to “wing it”…. I do not want a keynote speaker to “wing it” either.

    3. Just because someone is smart, or they have done something cool, does not mean they belong on stage. We have all watched presentations where we would rather stick needles in our eyes than listen to the speaker go on any longer. If you are going to speak… be prepared and fine tune your oratory skills.

    4. Do not speak and run. When you speak the audience sees you as a “mini-celebrity” following your presentation. Stick around and mingle with the crowd. The people appreciate it and the meeting planners appreciate it.

    5. Become friends with other speakers, know their work, and refer them. I get a lot of referrals from other speakers who suggest me to meeting planners for the following year (many meetings do not want the same speakers back to back… so smart speakers refer those they respect so they are providing continued value to the meeting planners). The best meeting planners are always on the outlook for other good speakers.

    thom

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I quite agree, sir. I like your point about #3. Sometimes, it’s just not a presentation. The skills don’t come with the knowledge.

      4 is awesome, too.

  • http://www.rizzotees.com/ Chris @ Rizzo Tees

    Great post Chris – an unbelievably honest look at speaking, answering the question that so many people want to know – how much can you make? Of course, wanting to know that is definitely cart-before-the-horse. Nevertheless, I appreciate you being upfront (yet again) about how your business works.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      But of course I want to tell you. It helps you do better things. : )

  • http://www.rizzotees.com/ Chris @ Rizzo Tees

    Great post Chris – an unbelievably honest look at speaking, answering the question that so many people want to know – how much can you make? Of course, wanting to know that is definitely cart-before-the-horse. Nevertheless, I appreciate you being upfront (yet again) about how your business works.

  • http://www.rizzotees.com/ Chris @ Rizzo Tees

    Great post Chris – an unbelievably honest look at speaking, answering the question that so many people want to know – how much can you make? Of course, wanting to know that is definitely cart-before-the-horse. Nevertheless, I appreciate you being upfront (yet again) about how your business works.

  • http://twitter.com/computerchi Computerchi

    I like your honest and candid approach. I’ve been involved in public speaking for Toastmasters and I also provide training on IT and Marketing. I think that speaking is a skill that you can take from good to great. But at the heart of it all is the content. Without content it does not matter how good/great you are as a speaker. Still when people talk about public speaking the emphasis is on the context rather than the content.

    Chi

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I quite agree that you’ll learn plenty with speaking skills that will be useful in other gigs. I’m excited that you’ve learned this. : )

    • http://twitter.com/joebaz Joe Baz

      So true… I feel that while practicing your technique is important, it’s also important to be well versed in the domain knowledge you are presenting. It’s especially important for impromptu video interviews or when things doing go as planned with your speech.

  • http://twitter.com/computerchi Computerchi

    I like your honest and candid approach. I’ve been involved in public speaking for Toastmasters and I also provide training on IT and Marketing. I think that speaking is a skill that you can take from good to great. But at the heart of it all is the content. Without content it does not matter how good/great you are as a speaker. Still when people talk about public speaking the emphasis is on the context rather than the content.

    Chi

  • http://www.postadvertising.com Jon Thomas

    Chris, can’t thank you enough. I had posed a question about speaking to you yesterday during your UStream Q&A, so this couldn’t be more timely. Thanks for all your help.

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      I’m happy to help, Jon. : )

  • http://www.mazakaro.com Rahul@MazaKaro

    Very excellent , good tips despite my simple knowledge of this but i enjoyed reading since your post was so informative and on the topic ! thank you for sharing it ,i just think it’s early for me to be thinking of these pro stuff hah but helps for the future maybe

    • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

      Not everything is for everyone, that’s for sure. : )

  • Brint Driggs

    I’m new to your blog…thanks for the great content and direct advice! Based on my experience, you’re right on target! Looking forward learning more in the future!

  • http://yoursalesplaybook.com paulcastain

    Very helpful Chris!
    I really appreciate this.
    Respectfully,
    Paul Castain

  • http://www.60SecondMarketer.com Jamie Turner

    Thanks for the post, Chris.

    I especially agree with you regarding humor — many people shy away from humor because they’re afraid they’ll bomb.

    Two thoughts on this:

    1) Humor in a speech isn’t about telling a joke with a punch line. It’s about weaving some humor into a story that makes a business point. You’d be surprised how easy that is.

    2) A business audience is different from an audience at a comedy club. A comedy club expects humor, so their standards are higher. A business audience doesn’t expect humor, so they’re pleasantly surprised when a speaker comes out with a finely-tuned sense of humor.

    I use humor in my speaking gigs as a way to differentiate myself. It’s worked like a charm.

    One last thought for people interested in getting into speaking — unless you’re a beginner or unless it’s populated with super stars, I’d encourage people to decline offers for panel discussions.

    Most, but not all, panel discussions are less-than-satisfactory experiences for the audience and the speaker. Besides, if you’re going to be taken seriously as a speaker, then be a SPEAKER, not a panelist.

    My two cents.

    Thanks, as always, for your insights, Chris.

    – Jamie Turner
    Co-author, “How to Make Money with Social Media”
    Professional Speaker

  • http://www.60SecondMarketer.com Jamie Turner

    Thanks for the post, Chris.

    I especially agree with you regarding humor — many people shy away from humor because they’re afraid they’ll bomb.

    Two thoughts on this:

    1) Humor in a speech isn’t about telling a joke with a punch line. It’s about weaving some humor into a story that makes a business point. You’d be surprised how easy that is.

    2) A business audience is different from an audience at a comedy club. A comedy club expects humor, so their standards are higher. A business audience doesn’t expect humor, so they’re pleasantly surprised when a speaker comes out with a finely-tuned sense of humor.

    I use humor in my speaking gigs as a way to differentiate myself. It’s worked like a charm.

    One last thought for people interested in getting into speaking — unless you’re a beginner or unless it’s populated with super stars, I’d encourage people to decline offers for panel discussions.

    Most, but not all, panel discussions are less-than-satisfactory experiences for the audience and the speaker. Besides, if you’re going to be taken seriously as a speaker, then be a SPEAKER, not a panelist.

    My two cents.

    Thanks, as always, for your insights, Chris.

    – Jamie Turner
    Co-author, “How to Make Money with Social Media”
    Professional Speaker

  • http://www.workingnaked.com Lisa Kanarek

    These are excellent tips. I especially like the fact that you’re firm about your price. Companies are paying for your expertise, along with your time. And any speaker who takes the time to customize a presentation — actually all speakers should, but don’t — deserves a higher fee. Anyone who’s been speaking for years or is new to the business, will benefit from this post. Thanks!

  • http://www.workingnaked.com Lisa Kanarek

    These are excellent tips. I especially like the fact that you’re firm about your price. Companies are paying for your expertise, along with your time. And any speaker who takes the time to customize a presentation — actually all speakers should, but don’t — deserves a higher fee. Anyone who’s been speaking for years or is new to the business, will benefit from this post. Thanks!

  • http://twitter.com/BubbaSmith BubbaSmith

    Thanks Chris! This is extremely helpful for a young twenty something who is aspiring to be a communicator.

    I was curious if you’ve written anything or have any thoughts on the balance between promoting yourself and waiting for opportunities to come to you.

    Any thoughts?

    Thanks!

    Bubba Smith

  • http://www.mikeslife.org Mike CJ

    Useful information, thanks Chris. A question – do most speakers charge additionally for travel expenses, or is it generally accepted that they are part of the fee?

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • http://twitter.com/TheresaDelgado Theresa Delgado

    Great tips Chris – Thank you.

    Your points are not only perfect for speaking, but could also be used in any professional interaction. You never know when you’ll be able to help someone and what that relationship my bring!

    Thanks for being so down-to-earth in your writings – Theresa

  • Adriel Hampton

    Good stuff, Chris. I got my first paid speaking gig on your referral, and really appreciate that you’re always willing to help others up the ladder.

  • http://www.suzemuse.com/ Susan Murphy

    You only dedicated ONE short paragraph to practice??? ;-)

    Of all the tips here, the one that hits home the most to me is practice. Guys like you, and Mitch, and Seth, make public speaking look so easy – almost easy enough that any of us think we can just hop up on the stage for an hour, blather on a bit, then fire off an invoice for $25,000. To some, it must seem like easy money.

    But when one considers the amount of practice and preparation that goes into delivering a flawless speech, it quickly becomes clear that every penny is earned. And I’m not just talking about practicing the speech you’re about to give.

    What a great professional speaker is really getting paid for is the many many years of experience they have. They are getting paid to disseminate all of the stuff they have learned over the years about whatever it is they are talking about. The money has been earned over 10 or 20 years or more.

    Having stellar presentation skills is very important. But if I’m being paid the big bucks, I have to understand that a big chunk of that is going towards what I know. If I know it inside out, and say it even better…that’s where the magic is.

  • http://www.rerockstar.com Matt Stigliano – @rerockstar

    “The more you can talk with others, the more they’ll remember you, and ally with you.”

    Bingo! I met you so briefly at BlogWorld, but when I asked for a second of your time to sign my book, it wasn’t a scribble-scribble-move-on sort of moment. You asked questions, you spoke to me, and you followed up a million times after that. You’re still doing it. The presentation is long over, but you’re still taking the time to talk with others (in this case me).

    Absolute proof of this theory.

    I learned the same lesson from rock and roll. Even when I was sick and feverish, I still tried to have a few moments to chat after the show – the difference it makes is enormous. Even now, I still get to speak with “fans” who comment on that one time I stuck around and the impact it had.

  • http://www.rerockstar.com Matt Stigliano – @rerockstar

    “The more you can talk with others, the more they’ll remember you, and ally with you.”

    Bingo! I met you so briefly at BlogWorld, but when I asked for a second of your time to sign my book, it wasn’t a scribble-scribble-move-on sort of moment. You asked questions, you spoke to me, and you followed up a million times after that. You’re still doing it. The presentation is long over, but you’re still taking the time to talk with others (in this case me).

    Absolute proof of this theory.

    I learned the same lesson from rock and roll. Even when I was sick and feverish, I still tried to have a few moments to chat after the show – the difference it makes is enormous. Even now, I still get to speak with “fans” who comment on that one time I stuck around and the impact it had.

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  • scholarships for women

    Interesting article indeed. I also believe that observing the professionals while they speak is also important in developing ones’ own skills. Also, the importance of practice cant be underrated.

  • Kiai Kim

    How many speeches had you made before charging for your first professional speech? (I’m giving my “first” public speech on Friday. Really not my first, but first of its calibur.)