Simple Touchpoints of Loyalty

Lollipop Boy It’s always in the details, the little things, those human moments. Always. Whenever we let those slip, that’s where we miss out further down the line. Think about sales transactions where you feel like the salesperson is treating you like a quota. Think about customer service moments when you know the person doesn’t care, doesn’t want to help, and is wasting your time and theirs. And now, think about the opposite: those moments when someone earns your respect from the simplest of moments, what I call a “touchpoint of loyalty.”

Offline, these come easily. You can turn to a coworker, look them in the eyes, and say, “Thank you. I appreciate your work.” You might tip your server 50% instead of 20%. In person, it’s easy. But how do we create simple touchpoints of loyalty online? Some thoughts.

9 Simple Touchpoints of Loyalty

  1. Comment on other people’s blogs as often as you can.
  2. Reply to people or help them spread the word on Twitter and/or Facebook.
  3. Write posts filled with admiration for people you enjoy online, and send links to their work.
  4. Connect people with like-minded people before they ask (using LinkedIn or similar).
  5. Wish people a happy birthday, or luck with their test, or other related-to-them encouragement.
  6. Share job opportunities. You never know who’s looking for more when you’re drowning in too much.
  7. Invite people to coffee. Just 20 minutes might really change someone’s day, week, month.
  8. Write recommendations on LinkedIn to those whose work you can vouch for. Do it before they ask.
  9. Send 10 emails a day to people you’re in danger of falling out of touch with, and make them simple and request-free.

You can probably think of many more. Maybe we should list them in the comments section? What do you have? What do you think about when you read this?

Do you see how this applies in personal life as well as business?

ChrisBrogan.com runs on the Genesis Framework

Genesis Theme Framework

The Genesis Framework empowers you to quickly and easily build incredible websites with WordPress. Whether you're a novice or advanced developer, Genesis provides you with the secure and search-engine-optimized foundation that takes WordPress to places you never thought it could go.

With automatic theme updates and world-class support included, Genesis is the smart choice for your WordPress website or blog.

Become a StudioPress Affiliate

  • barbarahannan

    I think you are on to the very core of what matters here. There's no sense doing what we do unless it has an impact on someone. Hopefully a positive one.

    Snail mail is peerless among all forms of communication.

    It's personal, genuine, and the very fact there is acknowledged amount of time and effort involved with going through the process of writing it to sending it speaks volumes. And it's some thing easily saved and even treasured.

    Frankly, one you didn't mention was tweeting about the person. Sometimes I hesitate, fearing contempt by my followers for openly seeming to “brown nose,” — but then I do it anyway because who says I can't? There are no hard fast rules as far as I'm concerned on Twitter. It's man-made and can be “man-changed” if we want it to be.

  • http://www.franklintello.com/ Franklin Tello

    Hi Chris,

    Thank you so much for taking the time to share these points with us. Besides admiring your work and learning from it, I am very glad to see that you not only “preach” this stuff, but also make it a habit of yours.

    I especially like point #7. It is so important to look for ways to meet people in the offline world, in addition to whatever relationship we might have with them online. It adds so much value to the relationship.

    Please keep up the great work Chris,

    Franklin

  • pbrannigan

    Chris -

    This is a great post. I am going to print it and put it in my “feel” good folder. Simply a credo to be successful in life professionally and personally. I love the idea of #10. I hadn't thought about that but you are correct about keeping your network fresh with contact that sometimes doesn't have a Valid Business Reason beyond “How are you doing, really?”

    Great post… Looking forward to the book. I just got the call it is in at my local book store.
    Pauline Brannigan

  • http://hostwisely.com/ Web Hosting Reviews

    This is really an interesting review. This seems to give further explanation and relevant ideas about the topic that is featured on the article. This is really a great post, which I and many more readers can get ideas about the said topic.

  • http://twitter.com/SharonFuhrman Sharon Fuhrman

    What a fabulous post. Great to see folks being encourage to care for others! Small things really do make a huge difference!

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

    So happy to hear it, Pauline. It's what I hope to do most in this world.

  • http://chrisbrogan.com Chris Brogan

    Always happy to help. Steal it and do good things.

  • deborahrichmond

    So true. I advise my clients, who are small business owners, to not only get on a social network, but interact, REALLY interact. It does not always come natural to them when they first start, but with time, if they are truly interested in the medium, they can really build a community that has value to them and they have value to their community members.

  • jamieklemcke

    Great reminder! And another, just take a quick second today to call someone and give a personal “hello” or “thank you.” I love the comment on writing a note as not many take the time to do so these days.

  • http://www.facebook.com/nerdgasm Will Sloan

    Treating people with loyalty, respect, kindness, sincerity, and generosity is the only way to accomplish improve the state of our social dynamic. I think anytime a face to face interaction is an option it should be preferred. Often times, in today's society, we choose the “one off” approach when communicating. It's almost as if we would rather keep people at arms length, so to speak. When a face to face isn't available, try picking up the phone. That extra effort to make it a personal interaction makes a significant difference.

    As we become more dependent on technology-based communication we risk sacrificing the emotional element that helps us define our aesthetic and character. Admittedly, I'm an internet fiend but I also understand the importance of true personal interaction. Words, expression, sentiment and feeling; all so crucial to our mental and emotional development and well-being.

    You can quote me on this: Kindness is like wasabi; a little goes a long way. But unlike wasabi, kindness never hurts.

    I'm a big fan of your blog and really enjoy your insightful perspectives. Keep it up!

  • Pingback: תחזוקת קשרים באינטרנט

  • http://twitter.com/TomDickson tomdickson

    Chris, Thank you very much for this insightful list.

    It is truly the relationships we build (and obviously maintain, through simple acts like the ones you’ve shared) that lead us to happiness and success. Not cheap tactics and the will to do anything to get ahead, that some have taught in the past, and some still employ (*coughspammers*).

    The ‘social media revolution’ is happening because people want to know, like and trust people before working or becoming customers with them… In your face, interruption marketing just doesn’t fly well with people in the way the world is now.

    Again Thanks, and this list will be posted near my desk! :)

  • http://www.tayloryou.com cytaylor

    Much of what is being advanced is just as common place offline as online. It’s good to have it documented. But yes, I am deploying many of the tips here and have been for the last few years as I have recognized that networking is not about me but what I can do for someone else. For example, notifying a distant colleague about a job opening that I discovered on LinkedIn — or suggesting another former colleague as a top candiate for a freelance opportunity.

    The only pointer I would add is to make sure to stay in touch with your contacts on a regular basis — and “pull” them into opportunities for which they are best suited.

  • http://www.marketlikeachick.com Coree

    One thing I especially admire about you, Chris, is that you always keep things real and manage to bring us back around to the basics of using the simple things in life in our business. Thanks for the reminder to reach out and show some real time attention to our communities.

  • Anonymous

    #11 dont be stingy with the compliments. if you like the shirt the stranger is wearing, say so!
    I’m thinking I have to read brogan’s book. will it read like the blog?? i really enjoy reading the blog

  • http://janetengel.livejournal.com/ janetengel

    Love this post and thank you!

    see my comments related to this and the NW/DL merger ….

    http://janetengel.livejournal.com/25684.html

  • Anonymous

    Chris, I am just discovering your work and love it. Thank you for this great reminder of how important connection is–always. Connection, just saying hello without requests. Fabulous!

  • Pingback: Box Scores: Aug 17-23 – “Repeat Tweets, Mirror Neurons & Being Wrong” « Work. Play. Do Good.

  • http://twitter.com/NomikiKonst Nomiki Konst

    Well said. Very karmic. Again, a great example of bring the humanity to the internet. I couldn’t agree more.

    Nomiki
    http://www.TheYippie.com

  • Pingback: Magical customer service « People like to share

  • Anonymous

    Thank you Chris!

    I’d add to your #5 all sorts of congratulatory sentiments: congratulate people for getting a promotion, new job, new baby, etc.

    And to #6, besides sharing job opportunities, share articles of interest that could help people in their industry, job, family, etc.

    I must also add a thank you to Alexanderirving for noting that the concepts in your blog, Chris, apply to life well beyond social media.
    Thank you also to Jodi Kaplan (and many others) who’ve suggested handwritten notes–I have just recently started writing them and it gives me such pleasure and satisfaction to do so…as well as to receive them!

  • http://www.jodiontheweb.com/ jodiontheweb

    As usual, this is great Chris. Playing off your earlier post on 19 online presence management chores, I feel like this list is doable and can make a huge difference. Thanks!!

  • http://www.wordmastercopywriting.com djschultz

    Great information. While engaging in social media, it is even more important to include the human touch, personal thoughtful responses when people make a difference. I see social media as a way for us all to become more thoughtful, whether in the workplace or in life. The Internet, when used in the right way allows us to do so with more speed and agility. We all need to take advantage and use it in such a way.

  • http://www.superiorpromos.com/ Promotional Products

    Great stuff here, I think you keep coming back to the point of connecting with people. This seems like a simple thing to do; say thanks, send out an appreciative email, etc. but this is often overlooked. Many friends, business partners and customers will greatly appreciate the extra step you take to show them that you are loyal and appreciative of them.

  • Pingback: Social Tuesday: loyalty, Whole Foods, marketing strategy « Two-Way Street

  • http://www.snacktools.com/ Codruta Moga

    There are a lot of things to learn from you, Chris, but the main idea stays the same: help and create meaningful relationships.

    thank you

  • http://www.VickieSmith.com Vickie Smith-Siculiano, PMP

    great tips on saying thank you online – something often forgotten – but how easy is it to comment on something you DON’T like? Then everyone hears about it and there’s a PR frenzy when it didn’t have to get there in the first place. Be nice people, it goes a long way! :) great stuff – thanks

  • Pingback: Why Would You Bother to Comment?

  • Pingback: On Labor Day, Have Somebody’s Back

  • Susan Wakefield

    I was really touched by the tributes to Sen Ted Kennedy at his death. Chris, you have described in your post on small acts of kindness, I believe, some of the very qualities that set Kennedy’s life apart from so many others. He was a great man in many ways and I believe it is not because he was born into a wealthy, highly influential family or because he was a legislative, compromise making, deal brokering genius and not because he bravely and gallantly lead his family through times of unspeakable personal tragedy played out in the public eye. His greatness came because he demonstrated in many small ways how much he cared about people. He was often the first or only person to send a note, make an appearance or lend a hand when someone was in a difficult spot. This “small acts of kindness” philosophy that Kennedy acts out frequently showed the greatness of his character.

  • Susan Wakefield

    I was really touched by the tributes to Sen Ted Kennedy at his death. Chris, you have described in your post on small acts of kindness, I believe, some of the very qualities that set Kennedy’s life apart from so many others. He was a great man in many ways and I believe it is not because he was born into a wealthy, highly influential family or because he was a legislative, compromise making, deal brokering genius and not because he bravely and gallantly lead his family through times of unspeakable personal tragedy played out in the public eye. His greatness came because he demonstrated in many small ways how much he cared about people. He was often the first or only person to send a note, make an appearance or lend a hand when someone was in a difficult spot. This “small acts of kindness” philosophy that Kennedy acts out frequently showed the greatness of his character.

  • Pingback: Today is someone’s birthday. « in over your head

  • http://www.purelife-shoes.com/ Timberland shoes

    I like what you said.

  • http://www.purelife-shoes.com/ Timberland shoes

    I like what you said.

  • Pingback: » Top 30 + 200 Blog Posts on Social Media Spotlight Ideas

  • Pingback: » Top 250 Blog Posts – Advertising, Marketing, Social Media, Digital Spotlight Ideas

  • dawngoodsell

    Have an authentic “It's my pleasure” service standard! I mean authentic! I treat ALL our clients with a “It's my pleasure servants heart” and I know I mean it and they know I mean it! It's fun because you can tell they are not used to being treated that way….they'll say “thanks Dawn” and when I reply “It's my pleasure”…they actually giggle!

  • Pingback: Nurture Technique: What Can You Do For Your Network? « BizTribe

  • http://www.kayseriwebtasarim.com Kayseri Web Tasarım

    good

  • http://www.mygc.com/cash4u The Candle Queen

    These are very simple but amazing everday things that we can all do! Thank you!

  • http://www.massroids.com/ buy steroids

    Good site! I really love how it is easy on my eyes and the data are well written. I’m wondering how I might be notified whenever a new post has been made.