Social Media Events Are Fragmenting

shattered This past weekend, the New Media Expo happened in Las Vegas, Nevada. There have been a lot of posts floating around the blogosphere about the event, and I’ve been thinking about what I want to say about it. I think there’s a trend to observe here, and that it’s right in front of us: the state of podcasting and social media events is mirroring the media and technology these events cover. Some thoughts on a few of the events.

The New Media Expo Story

I read James Lewin’s coverage of the event, where he asks if tech trade shows still matter. Short answer: yes, but I’ll get back to that.

Tim Bourquin posted his frustrations about the business at large here. Gutsy move, actually, and I had a lot of thoughts about the post that I want to talk about, but maybe not here. (Note: remember, I also work for a media and events company.

Dave Peck voiced his dissatisfaction here. Part of the complaints in the comments were about the shift to Las Vegas (from Ontario, California). Vegas is tricky for events.

My Take

I think Tim and Emile Bourquin (and team) have put on a great show over the years. I enjoy their event. It’s worth paying for. I think they’ve done lots to bring together the tenuous “industry” that circles podcasting and media making. I would’ve been there this year, but a last-minute conflict pulled me out of the game. Otherwise, I was proud that I was asked to take the stage at an event I loved in 2006 when I first attended it. I hope Tim continues making a show, but if not, I understand his perspective.

For those who try comparing NME to PodCamp (note: I’m co-founder of PodCamp), it’s not the same thing. Tim’s show is worth the price of admission. He goes to a great expense to put it on. PodCamps are different, and we offset the costs by doing volunteer labor. One isn’t better than the other. They’re different. More about PodCamps later in the post.

But now, think about podcasting. Where is THAT going? If you can guess that one correctly, get back to us all. It’s been a crazy ride so far.

Blog World Expo

Rick Calvert and team are putting on Blog World Expo in a few weeks, and I will be in attendance. This event covers blogging heavily, but also has a new media track. It debuted last year in Las Vegas, and appears there this year, too. This means there were two events about social media (let’s not quibble over terms) within a month of each other. I planned on attending both. Why? Different crowds. Tim’s event has a history and brings lots of the podcasting world’s brightest. Rick’s event brought diverse people like religious, military, sports, and political bloggers, and I liked that.

Those are two events about social media, within a month of each other, in the same state.

And again, what’s the state of blogging? People are slipping off to twitter and tumble and seesmic. Some blogs are more and more like mainstream outfits now. Others are falling apart into lifestreams. Is there a blogging industry? Not sure.

Other events

Let’s add to that Gnomedex (I fly out later today), South by Southwest, Podcasters Across Borders, SOBCon, and several other social media events of varying prices.

Add on top of that the several dozen PodCamp events, lots of various social media events, meetups, tweetups, Mashable-ups, TechCrunch50, and we haven’t even spilled over into the bigger events like all of Tim O’Reilly’s stuff. And now, we have the crux of the issue.

As Goes the Social Media, So Goes the Events

Why aren’t we catching on that blogs are atomizing into blogs/twitter/friendfeed/seesmic/google reader comments/ etc, and thus, the events are going to start to feel that way, too? It’s like we need a FriendFeed for events at this point, to sum up all the experiences we’re having, and those we have to skip.

Want to see just how diffuse this is becoming? Look at Robert Scoble’s watchlist on Upcoming.org. And that’s not all of them. You need to get into Somewhat Frank’s Calendar, and a few other choice places to see all the social media events.

There are almost more events than there are bloggers and podcasters, and that’s in the US alone.

What Comes Next

If I knew this, I’d be a billionaire. But I can say this: the event space shifts and turns all the time. There used to be Comdex, a super-event will gazillions of people. That atomized and now several other events took its place. E3 used to be the gamer’s event of the year. Things rise, things fall. They swell up, they dissipate.

As a consumer of events (I go to dozens a year), I’m putting my personal value in attending into three camps:

  1. Who will I meet there from the industry itself?
  2. Who will I meet there are prospective clients who have also come to attend the event?
  3. Where are my friends going?

Note that I didn’t say I wanted to see where the vendors and new technology are. Why? Because you’ll tell me that. (You= Paisano, Engadget, Louis Gray, Robert Scoble, Center Networks, etc).

Note that I didn’t say where all the great speakers will be. I love meeting great speakers, but I try do do that in the hallways between speeches.

Note that I don’t care which show is the biggest ,best, only, and all the other terms marketers want to use.

As a PRODUCER of events, I have certain goals and put my value in the following:

  • How can I deliver the most value for a reasonable cost?
  • How can I make the event last before, during, and after with online community?
  • How can I empower others to make their own experiences?
  • How can I deliver the most education?

To me, as things spread out, diffuse, and move differently between larger and smaller crowd sizes, I will focus on adjusting my expectations, making the ideas around the events more flexible, and trying to deliver as much to the community as I can around the constraints as they come up. I’m working, as always, from a passion for what comes next, and the goal of helping others learn and then execute.

And I know this, too: Tim, Rick, everyone else mentioned above, and everyone creating events is either thinking the same way, or they’re bound for some rough waters.

I’ve got my own event coming up with partners David Meerman Scott and Paul Gillin in October. This one is more geared towards helping marketers and PR professionals understand what all the other events listed above live and breathe on a daily basis. It’s a bit different in that way. And yet, I’m mindful of everything I’ve covered in this post.

Just the same, there’s a lot to learn, and many connections to be made, and many new people coming into the social media space every day. We’ll find ways to get everyone together face to face.

Just be mindful of everything going on around the actual ticket you bought, and the sessions you liked or didn’t like. You’re part of it with us. And that’s the good news.

[chrisbrogan.com]

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  • http://www.financialaidpodcast.com Christopher Penn, Financial Ai

    Podcasting is going exactly where it should be – away from shiny object of the day to useful platform for delivering value. Podcasting is being recognized as part of the puzzle, but not the whole – no more so than radio or billboards or direct mail are the answer. It has to make sense in the context of what you’re trying to accomplish.

    As for events like NME, there are still PLENTY of community events. This weekend in Connecticut, there’s a conference that will be free to all, draw over 10,000 people, and chances are you’ve never, ever heard of it. It’s called Schemitzun, the Mashantucket Pequot festival of harvest corn, one of the American Indian big conferences. It’s not like NME – it’s in a big, open field, with lots of drums, regalia, and everything you won’t find at a trade show, but for the Pequot nation and their friends, it’s a trade show and more.

    This is a possible future as well for events like PodCamp and NME – events tailored precisely to the community they need to serve.

  • http://www.financialaidpodcast.com Christopher Penn, Financial Aid Podcast

    Podcasting is going exactly where it should be – away from shiny object of the day to useful platform for delivering value. Podcasting is being recognized as part of the puzzle, but not the whole – no more so than radio or billboards or direct mail are the answer. It has to make sense in the context of what you’re trying to accomplish.

    As for events like NME, there are still PLENTY of community events. This weekend in Connecticut, there’s a conference that will be free to all, draw over 10,000 people, and chances are you’ve never, ever heard of it. It’s called Schemitzun, the Mashantucket Pequot festival of harvest corn, one of the American Indian big conferences. It’s not like NME – it’s in a big, open field, with lots of drums, regalia, and everything you won’t find at a trade show, but for the Pequot nation and their friends, it’s a trade show and more.

    This is a possible future as well for events like PodCamp and NME – events tailored precisely to the community they need to serve.

  • http://www.charlesheflin.com Charles Heflin

    I believe that that everything is atomizing because of mass confusion. Bloggers that have dispersed their efforts into lifestreaming instead of blogging are leaving their social focal points by the wayside in favor of more direct communication technologies like Twitter. I believe this is a mistake. Much like giving up on your real estate to live in the street.

    Similar, there are so many micro events in the industry that a similar confusion is arising. It seems that people are chasing their tails to stay in the game. They seem confused (and rightfully so) about what even to attend to enhance their business.

    I for one will sit right here in the comfort of my office, read reports, network with people and make my own personal business decisions without moving around or chasing my tail.

    There is something to be said for consistency. Fragmenting your effort is not the answer. Don’t become atomized, stay the course, do what has always worked while seeking to implement new technologies and strategies where they make sense.

    Charles Heflin
    Twitter @CharlesHeflin

  • http://www.charlesheflin.com Charles Heflin

    I believe that that everything is atomizing because of mass confusion. Bloggers that have dispersed their efforts into lifestreaming instead of blogging are leaving their social focal points by the wayside in favor of more direct communication technologies like Twitter. I believe this is a mistake. Much like giving up on your real estate to live in the street.

    Similar, there are so many micro events in the industry that a similar confusion is arising. It seems that people are chasing their tails to stay in the game. They seem confused (and rightfully so) about what even to attend to enhance their business.

    I for one will sit right here in the comfort of my office, read reports, network with people and make my own personal business decisions without moving around or chasing my tail.

    There is something to be said for consistency. Fragmenting your effort is not the answer. Don’t become atomized, stay the course, do what has always worked while seeking to implement new technologies and strategies where they make sense.

    Charles Heflin
    Twitter @CharlesHeflin

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  • http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com KatFrench

    I had similar ponderings about ad:tech Chicago and their social media sessions earlier this month.

    I think that the critical issue here is transition. Social media is transitioning from being a fringe, experimental channel into the mainstream. Which means there’s a pretty wide divide between the people who adopted it much earlier, and those who are just now (sometimes more or less against their will) jumping into the fray.

    I think trying to speak to both audiences, or not being crystal clear about which audience you’re speaking to, is going to make or break conferences that deal with social media over the next few years.

  • http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com KatFrench

    I had similar ponderings about ad:tech Chicago and their social media sessions earlier this month.

    I think that the critical issue here is transition. Social media is transitioning from being a fringe, experimental channel into the mainstream. Which means there’s a pretty wide divide between the people who adopted it much earlier, and those who are just now (sometimes more or less against their will) jumping into the fray.

    I think trying to speak to both audiences, or not being crystal clear about which audience you’re speaking to, is going to make or break conferences that deal with social media over the next few years.

  • http://www.socialmediaexplorer.com KatFrench

    I had similar ponderings about ad:tech Chicago and their social media sessions earlier this month.

    I think that the critical issue here is transition. Social media is transitioning from being a fringe, experimental channel into the mainstream. Which means there’s a pretty wide divide between the people who adopted it much earlier, and those who are just now (sometimes more or less against their will) jumping into the fray.

    I think trying to speak to both audiences, or not being crystal clear about which audience you’re speaking to, is going to make or break conferences that deal with social media over the next few years.

  • http://web-strategist.com Jeremiah Owyang

    Great analysis here Chris, well written.

  • http://web-strategist.com Jeremiah Owyang

    Great analysis here Chris, well written.

  • sarah vela

    Awesome analysis, Chris. Clipping it to SocialMedian. We’ve been talking a lot about this fragmentation on the podcast lately (on and off air)…

  • sarah vela

    Awesome analysis, Chris. Clipping it to SocialMedian. We’ve been talking a lot about this fragmentation on the podcast lately (on and off air)…

  • sarah vela

    Awesome analysis, Chris. Clipping it to SocialMedian. We’ve been talking a lot about this fragmentation on the podcast lately (on and off air)…

  • http://www.terrystarbucker.com Terry Starbucker

    Hi Chris – as a co-founder and partner in SOBCon I very much agree with your thought process here (and thanks for the link too). Liz Strauss and I use the word “value” all the time when we talk about what’s most important to us in putting on an event like SOBCon. We’ve also realized that giving “breathing space” to attendees to indeed make their own experiences is vitally important. We’ve learned a lot from our first two shots at this, and I thank you for your timely thoughts as we apply our learnings in planning for SOBCon09.

    All the best,
    Terry

  • http://www.terrystarbucker.com Terry Starbucker

    Hi Chris – as a co-founder and partner in SOBCon I very much agree with your thought process here (and thanks for the link too). Liz Strauss and I use the word “value” all the time when we talk about what’s most important to us in putting on an event like SOBCon. We’ve also realized that giving “breathing space” to attendees to indeed make their own experiences is vitally important. We’ve learned a lot from our first two shots at this, and I thank you for your timely thoughts as we apply our learnings in planning for SOBCon09.

    All the best,
    Terry

  • http://www.terrystarbucker.com Terry Starbucker

    Hi Chris – as a co-founder and partner in SOBCon I very much agree with your thought process here (and thanks for the link too). Liz Strauss and I use the word “value” all the time when we talk about what’s most important to us in putting on an event like SOBCon. We’ve also realized that giving “breathing space” to attendees to indeed make their own experiences is vitally important. We’ve learned a lot from our first two shots at this, and I thank you for your timely thoughts as we apply our learnings in planning for SOBCon09.

    All the best,
    Terry

  • http://treedia.com Glenn Gaudet

    Chris,

    Great analysis, it is all about fragmentation. Fragmentation is sometimes necessary when audiences are different. What will make the next BIG event in new media is when there is enough aggregated audiences that will buy from the same type of vendors. For example, when the podcasting group from ABC is buying from the same vendors (albeit on a different scale) as the semi-pro podcast producer, there will be enough money at stake for a vendor such as Sony to invest heavily in an event. When this happens, the show producer has more money to invest in marketing and in theory the show grows as long as the industry does. You and I both experienced this first hand. (note to readers – Chris and I worked together in a past life) I am curious what technology or product may drive this?

    Thanks for this blog entry. Great issue.

    Best,

    Glenn

  • http://treedia.com Glenn Gaudet

    Chris,

    Great analysis, it is all about fragmentation. Fragmentation is sometimes necessary when audiences are different. What will make the next BIG event in new media is when there is enough aggregated audiences that will buy from the same type of vendors. For example, when the podcasting group from ABC is buying from the same vendors (albeit on a different scale) as the semi-pro podcast producer, there will be enough money at stake for a vendor such as Sony to invest heavily in an event. When this happens, the show producer has more money to invest in marketing and in theory the show grows as long as the industry does. You and I both experienced this first hand. (note to readers – Chris and I worked together in a past life) I am curious what technology or product may drive this?

    Thanks for this blog entry. Great issue.

    Best,

    Glenn

  • http://www.geekmommy.net GeekMommy

    Fantastic analysis Chris – although I’m relatively new to the social media events, it reminds me of similar event-based, geographically diverse “circuits” I’ve been involved in.

    There are 2 major points that event organizers have to consider with regard to location:
    1) is there enough local draw that it’s sustainable if the ‘traveling’ crowd decides not to show up en masse?
    2) is the area appealing enough to draw the ‘traveling’ crowd so that the local crowd gets the benefit?

    There are other points as well – which you touched on tangentially:
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled at the same time?
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled in the same location within a short time-frame?
    - Are you priced within reach/reason of your target market? Let’s be honest on this one – beginners/novices in this field might pay $200-500 for a 3 day event, but they aren’t going to invest a lot more than that for something that isn’t making them money. If you’re charging more than that, you’d better be catering to an experienced attendee or you won’t make your numbers.

    The fragmentation is inevitable – because you can’t be all things to all markets. As a field grows, those with experience start needing a different level of event than newcomers. As the gap between experienced and novice increases, so does the need to create events around different levels of understanding and knowledge.
    So, too, as the tools increase in number and type – because you can realistically only focus on so much in any one time span.

    Some events won’t make it. Others will find a niche. Still others will become the anchors of annual scheduling.

    The process is the same in every field – so yes, to a point, I can tell you the future on this one. I’ve seen it happen in more than one arena.

    But it’s good that you’ve started this discussion, because it’s very timely in the Social Media realm.

  • http://www.geekmommy.net GeekMommy

    Fantastic analysis Chris – although I’m relatively new to the social media events, it reminds me of similar event-based, geographically diverse “circuits” I’ve been involved in.

    There are 2 major points that event organizers have to consider with regard to location:
    1) is there enough local draw that it’s sustainable if the ‘traveling’ crowd decides not to show up en masse?
    2) is the area appealing enough to draw the ‘traveling’ crowd so that the local crowd gets the benefit?

    There are other points as well – which you touched on tangentially:
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled at the same time?
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled in the same location within a short time-frame?
    - Are you priced within reach/reason of your target market? Let’s be honest on this one – beginners/novices in this field might pay $200-500 for a 3 day event, but they aren’t going to invest a lot more than that for something that isn’t making them money. If you’re charging more than that, you’d better be catering to an experienced attendee or you won’t make your numbers.

    The fragmentation is inevitable – because you can’t be all things to all markets. As a field grows, those with experience start needing a different level of event than newcomers. As the gap between experienced and novice increases, so does the need to create events around different levels of understanding and knowledge.
    So, too, as the tools increase in number and type – because you can realistically only focus on so much in any one time span.

    Some events won’t make it. Others will find a niche. Still others will become the anchors of annual scheduling.

    The process is the same in every field – so yes, to a point, I can tell you the future on this one. I’ve seen it happen in more than one arena.

    But it’s good that you’ve started this discussion, because it’s very timely in the Social Media realm.

  • http://www.geekmommy.net GeekMommy

    Fantastic analysis Chris – although I’m relatively new to the social media events, it reminds me of similar event-based, geographically diverse “circuits” I’ve been involved in.

    There are 2 major points that event organizers have to consider with regard to location:
    1) is there enough local draw that it’s sustainable if the ‘traveling’ crowd decides not to show up en masse?
    2) is the area appealing enough to draw the ‘traveling’ crowd so that the local crowd gets the benefit?

    There are other points as well – which you touched on tangentially:
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled at the same time?
    - Are there other events that are similar in nature and draw scheduled in the same location within a short time-frame?
    - Are you priced within reach/reason of your target market? Let’s be honest on this one – beginners/novices in this field might pay $200-500 for a 3 day event, but they aren’t going to invest a lot more than that for something that isn’t making them money. If you’re charging more than that, you’d better be catering to an experienced attendee or you won’t make your numbers.

    The fragmentation is inevitable – because you can’t be all things to all markets. As a field grows, those with experience start needing a different level of event than newcomers. As the gap between experienced and novice increases, so does the need to create events around different levels of understanding and knowledge.
    So, too, as the tools increase in number and type – because you can realistically only focus on so much in any one time span.

    Some events won’t make it. Others will find a niche. Still others will become the anchors of annual scheduling.

    The process is the same in every field – so yes, to a point, I can tell you the future on this one. I’ve seen it happen in more than one arena.

    But it’s good that you’ve started this discussion, because it’s very timely in the Social Media realm.

  • http://vendor-tech.blogspot.com Gregg Marshall

    I have to say I looked at the agenda for Blog World Expo, the number of exhibitors (not very many) and the price and decided there was better content in some of the unconference format’s (e.g. OrlandoBlog the next week), despite being all volunteer…

  • http://vendor-tech.blogspot.com Gregg Marshall

    I have to say I looked at the agenda for Blog World Expo, the number of exhibitors (not very many) and the price and decided there was better content in some of the unconference format’s (e.g. OrlandoBlog the next week), despite being all volunteer…

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  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    Fascinating roundup and analysis, Chris. Thank you. For those of us coming to one or more of these events there is an extra direct cost of airfares and the opportunity cost of the time involved, so it is very helpful to get a comparison like this to help with decision-making. Something I know very clearly is that attending BlogWorld Expo in Las Vegas and ad:tech Beijing last year reminded me of how immensely stimulating and focusing it can be to spend some time in these environments, hanging out with people who share your interests and sitting in on great presentations. I sometimes think you folks in the US might not realize how blessed you are that the decision is mainly about a domestic airfare, a hotel and a couple of days out of your schedule. :)

  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    Fascinating roundup and analysis, Chris. Thank you. For those of us coming to one or more of these events there is an extra direct cost of airfares and the opportunity cost of the time involved, so it is very helpful to get a comparison like this to help with decision-making. Something I know very clearly is that attending BlogWorld Expo in Las Vegas and ad:tech Beijing last year reminded me of how immensely stimulating and focusing it can be to spend some time in these environments, hanging out with people who share your interests and sitting in on great presentations. I sometimes think you folks in the US might not realize how blessed you are that the decision is mainly about a domestic airfare, a hotel and a couple of days out of your schedule. :)

  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    Fascinating roundup and analysis, Chris. Thank you. For those of us coming to one or more of these events there is an extra direct cost of airfares and the opportunity cost of the time involved, so it is very helpful to get a comparison like this to help with decision-making. Something I know very clearly is that attending BlogWorld Expo in Las Vegas and ad:tech Beijing last year reminded me of how immensely stimulating and focusing it can be to spend some time in these environments, hanging out with people who share your interests and sitting in on great presentations. I sometimes think you folks in the US might not realize how blessed you are that the decision is mainly about a domestic airfare, a hotel and a couple of days out of your schedule. :)

  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    My previous comment might be a bit opaque. I meant to say “for those of us coming to one of more of these events from outside the USA, across an ocean with an airfare of somewhere between $1500 and $2000…”

  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    My previous comment might be a bit opaque. I meant to say “for those of us coming to one of more of these events from outside the USA, across an ocean with an airfare of somewhere between $1500 and $2000…”

  • http://www.deswalsh.com Des Walsh

    My previous comment might be a bit opaque. I meant to say “for those of us coming to one of more of these events from outside the USA, across an ocean with an airfare of somewhere between $1500 and $2000…”

  • http://www.blogworldexpo.com Rick Calvert

    Great post Chris. I certainly have a vision and an opinion on where this is all going. I could be completely wrong.

    First of all you have to believe that blogging, podcasting, internet radio and TV all equate to newspapers, magazines, radio and television all being reinvented at the same time.

    That’s not all new media is, but that is a very large part of it. People are for the first time in history able to start their own media outlet / brand as either a hobby, or a business for free or very close to free using services like blogger, blogtalk radio, WordPress, YouTube and hundreds of others.

    I think something you and many other “techcentric” folks are overlooking that everyone of the events you mentioned save BlogWorld are all built to appeal to the same group, or even niche’s within the same group of people.

    The mostly techy / geek set. Using the most conservative numbers there are 30 million fairly serious bloggers out there. Very few of them have ever heard of these events and will never find them when they do a google search because that is not what they are looking for.

    Most of them are not techies. They use the technology but have a very limited knowledge of how a blog works, let alone internet TV. They want to learn how to improve their content, build their audience, and quite a few of them have built audiences completely by accident and are thinking about how to monetize it. They have never heard of events like Adtech or Affiliate Summit. (Great events btw).

    While BlogWorld certainly attracts some of the usual suspects from the tech crowd, our strength and our goal is to serve the casual and novice blogger, podcaster, etc.

    I have said this many times, I feel the future is a big tent event, with tens of thousands of attendees. That is what we are trying to build BlogWorld to be.

    Its a little bit NAB crossed with ComicCon. A heavy dose of how to education and business oriented sessions with a lot of socializing with friends, peers, and Rock Stars of the medium’s.

    I do agree there is a place for many of the other events out there and lots of them will thrive because they serve their communities, but at the end of the day, most of us belong to a larger community of the blogosphere. And we all have common goals and needs in common no matter what we blog about.

    Its late, I’m tired and rambling.

    Blog on!
    Rick Calvert
    CEO & Co-founder
    BlogWorld & New Media Expo

  • http://www.blogworldexpo.com Rick Calvert

    Great post Chris. I certainly have a vision and an opinion on where this is all going. I could be completely wrong.

    First of all you have to believe that blogging, podcasting, internet radio and TV all equate to newspapers, magazines, radio and television all being reinvented at the same time.

    That’s not all new media is, but that is a very large part of it. People are for the first time in history able to start their own media outlet / brand as either a hobby, or a business for free or very close to free using services like blogger, blogtalk radio, WordPress, YouTube and hundreds of others.

    I think something you and many other “techcentric” folks are overlooking that everyone of the events you mentioned save BlogWorld are all built to appeal to the same group, or even niche’s within the same group of people.

    The mostly techy / geek set. Using the most conservative numbers there are 30 million fairly serious bloggers out there. Very few of them have ever heard of these events and will never find them when they do a google search because that is not what they are looking for.

    Most of them are not techies. They use the technology but have a very limited knowledge of how a blog works, let alone internet TV. They want to learn how to improve their content, build their audience, and quite a few of them have built audiences completely by accident and are thinking about how to monetize it. They have never heard of events like Adtech or Affiliate Summit. (Great events btw).

    While BlogWorld certainly attracts some of the usual suspects from the tech crowd, our strength and our goal is to serve the casual and novice blogger, podcaster, etc.

    I have said this many times, I feel the future is a big tent event, with tens of thousands of attendees. That is what we are trying to build BlogWorld to be.

    Its a little bit NAB crossed with ComicCon. A heavy dose of how to education and business oriented sessions with a lot of socializing with friends, peers, and Rock Stars of the medium’s.

    I do agree there is a place for many of the other events out there and lots of them will thrive because they serve their communities, but at the end of the day, most of us belong to a larger community of the blogosphere. And we all have common goals and needs in common no matter what we blog about.

    Its late, I’m tired and rambling.

    Blog on!
    Rick Calvert
    CEO & Co-founder
    BlogWorld & New Media Expo

  • http://www.blogworldexpo.com Rick Calvert

    Great post Chris. I certainly have a vision and an opinion on where this is all going. I could be completely wrong.

    First of all you have to believe that blogging, podcasting, internet radio and TV all equate to newspapers, magazines, radio and television all being reinvented at the same time.

    That’s not all new media is, but that is a very large part of it. People are for the first time in history able to start their own media outlet / brand as either a hobby, or a business for free or very close to free using services like blogger, blogtalk radio, WordPress, YouTube and hundreds of others.

    I think something you and many other “techcentric” folks are overlooking that everyone of the events you mentioned save BlogWorld are all built to appeal to the same group, or even niche’s within the same group of people.

    The mostly techy / geek set. Using the most conservative numbers there are 30 million fairly serious bloggers out there. Very few of them have ever heard of these events and will never find them when they do a google search because that is not what they are looking for.

    Most of them are not techies. They use the technology but have a very limited knowledge of how a blog works, let alone internet TV. They want to learn how to improve their content, build their audience, and quite a few of them have built audiences completely by accident and are thinking about how to monetize it. They have never heard of events like Adtech or Affiliate Summit. (Great events btw).

    While BlogWorld certainly attracts some of the usual suspects from the tech crowd, our strength and our goal is to serve the casual and novice blogger, podcaster, etc.

    I have said this many times, I feel the future is a big tent event, with tens of thousands of attendees. That is what we are trying to build BlogWorld to be.

    Its a little bit NAB crossed with ComicCon. A heavy dose of how to education and business oriented sessions with a lot of socializing with friends, peers, and Rock Stars of the medium’s.

    I do agree there is a place for many of the other events out there and lots of them will thrive because they serve their communities, but at the end of the day, most of us belong to a larger community of the blogosphere. And we all have common goals and needs in common no matter what we blog about.

    Its late, I’m tired and rambling.

    Blog on!
    Rick Calvert
    CEO & Co-founder
    BlogWorld & New Media Expo

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    Good one, I definitely like it. Awesome analysis, Chris. Clipping it to SocialMedian

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    thanks

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    I think Tim and Emile Bourquin (and team) have put on a great show over the years. I enjoy their event. It’s worth paying for. I think they’ve done lots to bring together the tenuous “industry” that circles podcasting and media making. I would’ve been there this year, but a last-minute conflict pulled me out of the game.

  • http://www.savetubevideo.com youtube downloader

    I think Tim and Emile Bourquin (and team) have put on a great show over the years. I enjoy their event. It’s worth paying for. I think they’ve done lots to bring together the tenuous “industry” that circles podcasting and media making. I would’ve been there this year, but a last-minute conflict pulled me out of the game.

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