Workflow- Social Media for Marketers

billboards What does a day in the life of a social media marketer look like? I’m not a marketer, so if I get some of your terms wrong, forgive me. I thought maybe we could do a walkthrough of a fictitious social media marketer, Yolanda, for a small hotel group (four hotels) in Boston. I picked hotels just because otherwise I’d have picked a software company. Let’s walk through a workflow, and then reconstruct it in bullets at the end.

Rise and Shine

First thing in the morning, Yolanda sends a quick tweet out to Twitter saying that she’s wondering what’s going on in Boston this week. A few of the locals give her some news she knows, but @loudmouthman mentions that he heard there’s a tech conference there Thursday. She searches around and finds it. Score, an opportunity to find some potential guests for her hotel.

Yolanda checks her RSS reader to see who’s been talking about hotels in Boston, meetups in Boston, conferences, events, tweetups, vacations, etc. She has several targeted searches with RSS feeds cooked for each, so browsing through to get the pulse of the city is easy. Yolanda also has a few hotel blogs and travel blogs in her reader, in case the occasional great idea is something she can run with. She hasn’t started blogging yet, but comments regularly. People know her name.

After getting the lay of the land, Yolanda pours her second cup of coffee and browses Yelp. She’s not frustrated like some business leaders. Instead, Yolanda has a proactive approach. She’s built a process at her four hotels such that on sign-in, guests are invited to get a Yelp account, so that they can learn what people are saying about restaurants and other venues in Boston. There’s also a polite encouragement to rate their stay via Yelp. (It’s a bit gutsy, and the CEO was a bit spooked when she started the practice, but so far – fingers crossed – people are giving her hotels a good rating.)

After Lunch

Mid-day, Yolanda’s helped her VP of marketing with some more traditional business for a few hours. She was happy to hear the VP say that she was willing to try out a YouTube promotion idea, and also to put some sponsor dollars towards a few Boston tech blogs that don’t write about hotels, but that are central to some events where people might find the affinity and choose her hotels over others. The VP kept wondering why the budget for both projects was so low, thinking there was an accident, but hey, social media isn’t about money: it’s about smaller victories.

Yolanda’s listening posts have found someone complaining about a bad stay. She goes onto the blog in question, apologizes for the situation, and offers a free night the next time this blogger is in town. This merits four comments from the blogger’s audience saying that this is good service. Yolanda feels happy. She worries about what listening will be like if this kind of interaction takes on.

On Twitter, Yolanda helps two people talking about the Red Sox to know where they might want to grab a bite after the game. Not at her hotel’s restaurant. None of her four are really known for post-baseball celebrations. She recommends the Boston Beer Works, which is always fun after a game, though a bit noisy.

Before Leaving Work

Yolanda wraps up her website analytics reports and realizes that she’s getting decent traffic from a specific blogger’s post. She thought it was positive, but had no idea it would drive so much awareness of the site. She makes a note to think about hosting a few bloggers’ meetups in their meeting rooms, free of charge, and seeing if that brings in some more guests. Yolanda closes the lid on her laptop and heads off to a Web Inno event in Kendall Square. It’s not her crowd, but she’s got a hunch it doesn’t hurt for her to hang with the geek crowd.

Summary

Yolanda used Twitter, some listening tools (Technorati.com and blogsearch.google.com), mixed with an RSS reader (Google Reader), commented on several blogs, and focused on Yelp as an active part of her marketing mix.

Now it’s your turn: is this realistic? Would you see this adding value? What else might she have done?

Is this post helpful?

These posts are made for sharing. Feel free to repost all or portions of this (as long as it’s not for profit). If you do post it, please make sure you kindly link back to [chrisbrogan.com] and give me credit. Thanks!

Photo credit, kennymatic

ChrisBrogan.com runs on the Genesis Framework

Genesis Theme Framework

The Genesis Framework empowers you to quickly and easily build incredible websites with WordPress. Whether you're a novice or advanced developer, Genesis provides you with the secure and search-engine-optimized foundation that takes WordPress to places you never thought it could go.

With automatic theme updates and world-class support included, Genesis is the smart choice for your WordPress website or blog.

Become a StudioPress Affiliate

  • http://www.virtuallin.com Cheryl Allin

    Wow, when you’re good you’re really good! This is a fantastic post – easy to grasp for even a newbie.

  • http://www.virtuallin.com Cheryl Allin

    Wow, when you’re good you’re really good! This is a fantastic post – easy to grasp for even a newbie.

  • Pingback: Social Media Manager | Virtual Buzz Assistant

  • Pingback: Social Media Manager or Virtual Assistant? | Buzzoodle Buzz Marketing

  • Pingback: Weekly Roundup: Posts from the PR World [8/29/08] « That’s Great PR! Blog

  • http://www.advancedbrain.com Ginger Kenney

    This is a great post Chris. I have been dabbling in social media for my company trying to decide what the most effective ways are to introduce the company and products to a larger audience. We have a Facebook page and a Twitter page and three of us are on both sites personally. Because one of our major products is used by education and health professionals, “The Listening Program,” our approach to date has been pretty conservative: announcing trainings, our International Conference, etc. Now we have a new brain training product that can be used by anyone, and we have to determine the best way to introduce that to a larger audience that could benefit from it. I also handle our wholesale accounts so cannot devote full time to social media, but still hope to find the most effective ways to use it.

  • http://www.advancedbrain.com Ginger Kenney

    This is a great post Chris. I have been dabbling in social media for my company trying to decide what the most effective ways are to introduce the company and products to a larger audience. We have a Facebook page and a Twitter page and three of us are on both sites personally. Because one of our major products is used by education and health professionals, “The Listening Program,” our approach to date has been pretty conservative: announcing trainings, our International Conference, etc. Now we have a new brain training product that can be used by anyone, and we have to determine the best way to introduce that to a larger audience that could benefit from it. I also handle our wholesale accounts so cannot devote full time to social media, but still hope to find the most effective ways to use it.

  • http://fontainedepierres.blogspot.com/ sacha

    Great post Chris,
    You say you’re not a marketer but you’re entitled to apply! Believe me, I work in a ad agency (so I am a marketer). A client of mine runs a chain of hotels in Quebec. Be sure I’ll forward her your post. it will help her become the next real world Yolanda.SD

  • http://fontainedepierres.blogspot.com/ sacha

    Great post Chris,
    You say you’re not a marketer but you’re entitled to apply! Believe me, I work in a ad agency (so I am a marketer). A client of mine runs a chain of hotels in Quebec. Be sure I’ll forward her your post. it will help her become the next real world Yolanda.SD

  • http://endavomediablog.typepad.com TatianaT

    Great post, Chris! I think you nailed it.
    I’ve got a couple of additions:

    Yolanda is getting ready to launch a microsite targeting tech professionals. The site will provide information about upcoming tech conferences and events as well as places to visit or dine at in Boston. The site will have a ‘tech events’ blog, image gallery and video library. Yolanda’s hotels are barely mentioned on the microsite – Yolanda is focusing on building relationships with potential customers by helping them connect with one another and facilitating conversations.

    On the day the microsite is launched, Yolanda sends out a SEO press release that encourages tech professionals to visit the site and subscribe to the ‘tech events’ blog’s RSS feed.

  • http://taticreativity.blogspot.com/ Tatiana Tugbaeva

    Great post, Chris! I think you nailed it.
    I’ve got a couple of additions:

    Yolanda is getting ready to launch a microsite targeting tech professionals. The site will provide information about upcoming tech conferences and events as well as places to visit or dine at in Boston. The site will have a ‘tech events’ blog, image gallery and video library. Yolanda’s hotels are barely mentioned on the microsite – Yolanda is focusing on building relationships with potential customers by helping them connect with one another and facilitating conversations.

    On the day the microsite is launched, Yolanda sends out a SEO press release that encourages tech professionals to visit the site and subscribe to the ‘tech events’ blog’s RSS feed.

  • http://www.velvetchainsaw.com Dave Lutz

    Chris, I’ve been lurking for a month or two trying to take in all I can on Social Networking. Love your posts! Since you chose to write about hotels, I had to jump in. Here are a couple thoughts:

    1) Yolanda’s hotel better offer free WiFi or the bloggers/techies she’s pursuing are going to slam her even after giving them a free meeting room.

    2) In the hotel and travel space, sites like Trip Advisor have become very trusted. Some hotels are just catching on to the importance of listening and responding to negative posts on trusted mediums like this. Hardly any are encouraging happy guests to share their comments and pictures on mediums Trip Advisor like sites. If I were Yolanda, I’d come up with a little card for front desk workers to give to happy customers with simple instructions on how to share their experience on Trip Advisor.

  • http://www.velvetchainsaw.com Dave Lutz

    Chris, I’ve been lurking for a month or two trying to take in all I can on Social Networking. Love your posts! Since you chose to write about hotels, I had to jump in. Here are a couple thoughts:

    1) Yolanda’s hotel better offer free WiFi or the bloggers/techies she’s pursuing are going to slam her even after giving them a free meeting room.

    2) In the hotel and travel space, sites like Trip Advisor have become very trusted. Some hotels are just catching on to the importance of listening and responding to negative posts on trusted mediums like this. Hardly any are encouraging happy guests to share their comments and pictures on mediums Trip Advisor like sites. If I were Yolanda, I’d come up with a little card for front desk workers to give to happy customers with simple instructions on how to share their experience on Trip Advisor.

  • Pingback: » A day in the life of a hotel social media marketer by Hotel Marketing Strategies Blog

  • Pingback: Certain Host » Blog Archive » Where is your business in the Twitter Yellow Pages?

  • http://www.adversityuniversityblog.com Stephen Hopson

    While I’m not a marketer persey, I really enjoyed reading this fictious story of Yolanda whose job is to use different social media methods to help draw attention to the hotel she works for. Very interesting.

    It sounded very realistic – I didn’t see anything out of the ordinary or unrealistic. You did a very good job painting a picture of how powerful social media tools can be, especially Twitter. I hadn’t heard of Yelp until now. Going to look at it.

    We need to give good companies a big SHOUT while letting others know about those that treat customers shabbily, thinking they can get away with it.

  • http://www.adversityuniversityblog.com Stephen Hopson

    While I’m not a marketer persey, I really enjoyed reading this fictious story of Yolanda whose job is to use different social media methods to help draw attention to the hotel she works for. Very interesting.

    It sounded very realistic – I didn’t see anything out of the ordinary or unrealistic. You did a very good job painting a picture of how powerful social media tools can be, especially Twitter. I hadn’t heard of Yelp until now. Going to look at it.

    We need to give good companies a big SHOUT while letting others know about those that treat customers shabbily, thinking they can get away with it.

  • Kat Ramirez

    Hi Chris,

    I am new follower/fan of your posts and tweets. As a marketer by day, this story reinforces how critical it is for us to REALLY understand what kind of conversations are happening with, around and about our clients. We all talk about metrics, optimization,etc. The reality is that to truly deliver ROI, we need to understand the consumer/customer perspective. Thanks for a good article.

  • Kat Ramirez

    Hi Chris,

    I am new follower/fan of your posts and tweets. As a marketer by day, this story reinforces how critical it is for us to REALLY understand what kind of conversations are happening with, around and about our clients. We all talk about metrics, optimization,etc. The reality is that to truly deliver ROI, we need to understand the consumer/customer perspective. Thanks for a good article.

  • Pingback: Weekly Headlines: September 3 « Sarah’s Blog

  • http://www.byteorgetbitten.com ManoByte

    Hey Chris,

    I put together a plan for a client in the Hotel Industry that outlined the steps of Listen, Share, Lead. Nothing big or flashy and they thought it was “fluff”. Maybe you, me, and countless other do not understand Social Media Marketing.(Not)

  • http://www.byteorgetbitten.com ManoByte

    Hey Chris,

    I put together a plan for a client in the Hotel Industry that outlined the steps of Listen, Share, Lead. Nothing big or flashy and they thought it was “fluff”. Maybe you, me, and countless other do not understand Social Media Marketing.(Not)

  • Pingback: Answer: What Can Social Media Do For Me As A Director? | Whooah.biz

  • Pingback: Weekly Roundup: Posts from the PR World [8/29/08] | justinrlevy.com

  • Pingback: Storytelling With Social Media

  • Pingback: RSS Blog Capabilities

  • http://www.sikisizle.in SikiÅŸ izle

    thanks chris

  • http://www.usaugg-shops.com UGG

    ancient flame totem
    it stops the mouth not to say suddenly. three monster fox in front of it, have stood slowly, the hand extends to the bosom, put out nightfall uggs discount ugg boots both sides to have the red silk guangzhou's magic weapon, was precisely the unreliable fire warning. in this hot flame steamings in the lava burrow, the unreliable fire warning is also short black ugg illuminated faintly blushes, but center it that ancient flame totem, ugg usa as if also will at this moment burn ultra short ugg general, several want to spurt thinly. three monster fox,

    open in the ugg uk small ordinary way of seeing things that gentle white clothing female, at this moment is staring in hand's unreliable fire warning, several, some drop of teardrops, have not dropped quietly suddenly in the unreliable fire warning, a moment later, changes to makes the white smoke, curls raises. the book arrives at here, what is really the tear falls the front piece, mourns in one's heart, if dies, compares the author to write about here also unavoidably to stop the pen not to be good, does not endure to continue, that falls quietly waterdrop, but also withers and falls between your mine heart

  • Pingback: Your Weekend Reader: Morning Edition

  • http://www.savetubevideo.com youtube downloader

    Great post, Chris! I think you nailed it.

  • http://www.bronsonharrington.com/ Gnuboss

    Although this post id dated 2008, this is still a fantastically simple and effective approach.

    All too often social media managers are asked to build, maintain and integrate every channel under the sun and spam them in the name of social promotion.

    This approach is simple and only focuses on a few small channels, but works wonderfully well which is proof yet again that it’s better to pick one or two channels and use them well than have a million and use them badly.

    I know I’m going to be asking a few folks to come and read this one.